Who rented a hospital bed?

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ponygirlmom

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I've heard that the hardest part of recovering is getting in and out of bed. I think I may have asked this question before, so forgive me if I did, but who used their regular bed or a recliner after surgery, and who rented a hospital bed that goes up and down? If you rented the hospital bed, was it worth it?
 

WayneGM

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I used my regular bed with lots of pillows. To get out, I simply, got one foot on the ground and rolled out. NO PROBLEM!!!! :D I'm not sure renting one of those hospital beds would been that much better.
 

ctyguy

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bed was NOT an option when I got home. The recliner is where I camped out for about 6 weeks.
 

kfay

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My regular bed was not a problem and actually a welcome relief after sleeping in the hospital bed. They will teach you in the hospital how to get in and out of the bed. I just would swing one leg over the edge and then use it to leverage myself to get up.
 

Jkm7

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I have had two OHS in four years and both times came home directly to my bed. I used several more pillows than usual but never went near the leather recliner we've had for years in our family room. I was most comfortable in our bed and sometimes during the day, a nap on the couch.

A hospital bed would have been an annoyance to me and I would have had it removed immediately upon coming home.

The nurses will easily teach you how to get in and out of bed while in the hospital.
That method worked fine for me both times.
 

Gnusgal

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I've had lots of practice with getting out of bed without using my upper body muscles much. Here's my recommendation (which may not work for everyone):

When in the hospital, gradually work towards laying on a flat(ish) bed. Each night I would lower the back a little more until I was sleeping on it in its flat position (but still had pillows to prop me up). I hate sleeping on my back, which is why I worked towards this as quickly as I could. While in the hospital I used the bed to lower and raise my head to get in/out of it. However, at some point I began practicing leaving it flat and getting myself up and down without the help (sometimes DH would help lower me down gently). To get out I did what others have mentioned: put one leg over the edge then roll out. I recommend holding a pillow to your chest while you do that. It will help you not use those muscles for getting up.

By the time I got home (I was in the hospital 9 days, getting my coumadin regulated) it was not a problem transitioning to my own bed. Of course, I'd also had practice before (I've had a total of 16 surgeries at this point), and have never slept in a recliner. Mostly because (like I said before) I hate sleeping on my back. Even to this day I sleep on my side, hugging a pillow to protect my chest!

Good luck! You might try practicing getting in/out of bed now and see if you think you can do it.
 

ponygirlmom

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I've had lots of practice with getting out of bed without using my upper body muscles much.

I wonder how it will compare with getting in and out of bed after a C-section, when they have cut into your abdomen. My husband says that the abdomen cutting would make it harder to get up and down than chest cutting.

They did a LOT of cutting for my C-section (complications) -- way more than other women I know. Most of them were zipping around a few weeks after surgery. I didn't even drive for eight weeks!

Of course, after the C-section, once IN bed, everything was comfy. I hear it's not always that way for hearts.
 

Gnusgal

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I've never had a c-section, so I can't really say how it will compare. I did have 4 pacemakers implanted in my abdomen, but really only the first one cut into any muscle (the other 3 were just generator changes, which was near the surface). I also had gall bladder and ovarian cyst surgeries, but those were both laproscopic (sp?). However, based on THIS knowledge (which could be completely wrong), I would say that it is easier getting up with your stomach muscles in working order. One of the tricks I learned for getting up from a low couch (so you don't use your arms as leverage), is to hook my leg under the coffee table or something else that's handy (and stable), then use my abs like I'm doing a sit up. Works great unless your abs are sore too! I also use that method some when getting out of bed (hook my leg under the mattress). I look strange, but it works! :D (not sure if my description is doing the movement justice, though...)
 

Jkm7

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I wonder how it will compare with getting in and out of bed after a C-section, when they have cut into your abdomen. My husband says that the abdomen cutting would make it harder to get up and down than chest cutting.

They did a LOT of cutting for my C-section (complications) -- way more than other women I know. Most of them were zipping around a few weeks after surgery. I didn't even drive for eight weeks!

Of course, after the C-section, once IN bed, everything was comfy. I hear it's not always that way for hearts.


I've had two abdominal incisions.....one very long vertical one and a 6" horizontal one. Neither compared to having my chest cracked open twice. :eek: The vertical abdominal incision was the easiest, then the horizontal and then by far worse (FOR ME) were the chest incisions. But I managed fine both times and most of us do. The nurses are wonderful about helping us learn the best way to position ourselves.
 
S

strudell

While in the hospital, I actually felt more comfortable sleeping in the reclining chair they had in my room. So we contemplated renting one.

But when I got home, sleeping in my own bed was the best feeling. I still use about five pillows to prop myself up, but over the past week, I started sleeping on my right side.

I had to take over my wife's recliner since I got home since the couch is a bit uncomfortable, but the last few days, I've started taking my naps on the couch for the first time.

I'd say do what will make you feel better. But don't become overly reliable on "crutches". Little by littel get back into your old habits and you will feel much better. I'm only three weeks out of surgery and each day and night I make a little more progress.
 

ponygirlmom

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But when I got home, sleeping in my own bed was the best feeling. I still use about five pillows to prop myself up, but over the past week, I started sleeping on my right side.

A lot of people talk about sleeping on pillows or sleeping in recliners. It doesn't have anything to do with getting in and out of bed, so I'm wondering why. Is it easier to breathe? Does it hurt a lot to sleep on your side after surgery, but not so much on your back?
 

Gnusgal

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A lot of people talk about sleeping on pillows or sleeping in recliners. It doesn't have anything to do with getting in and out of bed, so I'm wondering why. Is it easier to breathe? Does it hurt a lot to sleep on your side after surgery, but not so much on your back?

Yes, it hurts. That's the honest truth. But it's MOSTLY the getting in/out. If I recall correctly (and it has been nearly 6 years) it's mostly changing positions that caused the most pain. Though for a while there feels like there's a pressure on your chest that can be uncomfortable. But generally once you get into a good position you won't be in too much pain... Except you start to get stiff and want to move which will hurt again... But it DOES get better! :D
 

Freddie

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My regular bed was not a problem and actually a welcome relief after sleeping in the hospital bed. They will teach you in the hospital how to get in and out of the bed. I just would swing one leg over the edge and then use it to leverage myself to get up.

Yep thats what I did. Didn't even think about using the recliners.......we have 4 of them, didn't even use extra pillows.
 

DebbyA

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Just make sure you can sit on the bed and reach the floor with your feet at the same time. Also I found a firmer mattress was easier to get on and off of.

The first night home from the hospital, I put one sock-clad foot out of our high bed, and my foot slipped out from under me. I caught myself by one hand on the bedside table, scared myself to death, but sustained no harm. From then on I slept in those sticky-footed hospital socks, and after a few days just moved to a lower bed in another room.

I also used a wedge pillow for several months. It wasn't painful to be prone, just very uncomfortable.
 

Bina

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I had to lie on my back....terrible rib cage and shoulder discomfort.
One thin pillow for my head. Stuffed a big pillow under the mattress to raise the head area.
Placed a small footstool nearby....but mostly rang my bell for hubby to come and give me a boost.(nice guy)
What would have been great is just a portable rail that you brace under the mattress for the bedside. Like the ones to keep kids from falling out.
 

Philip B

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Hospital Bed

Hospital Bed

Some members have gone the route of renting a hospital bed and their choice is perfectly okay.

I wasn't comfortable sleeping in bed for several months. For me the issue wasn't the getting up and out part, it was breathing. I needed to sleep propped-up to help reduce fluid build-up in my lungs. Despite several efforts to prop my self up in bed, I'd wake-up flat on my back and spend a couple of days coughing more than I needed to. Others probably didn't experience this issue at the same level as I did.

I used the sofa. My chocloate labs were not happy about me kicking them off the sofa, but they eventually got over it.

I did use my bed for recreational activities, but I couldn't sleep in it.

-Philip
 

hensylee

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I slept in a regular bed at my nurse cousin's home. It was really hard for me to get up because it hurt, but once I got the formula down, I was ok with it. Get a hospital bed, if you like. try the one in th hospital and if you like it, that might be your answer. Try getting up from flat and then try getting up by raising the bed.
 

cday

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Get a wedge pillow from a Med supply store

Get a wedge pillow from a Med supply store

My husband's nights were much better after a friend lent him a wedge pillow purchased from a medical supply store. It is made of foam, about 9 inches tall at the head down to 1/16th in. and 25 inches long. Thought to cost around $40. Much cheaper than renting a hospital bed.
 
P

paco512

I rented a bed and never used it...

I rented a bed and never used it...

I tried the first night but it kind of spooked me... It smelled funny and all i could think about was who used it last and why. I walked upstairs and was overjoyed with my own bed. I bought one of those TV pillows and it is just fine.


Paco512
Mini AVR, Cleveland Clinic 5-5-08
 

Plumber1

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I asked my Doc to write prescription for a hospital bed to be delivered to home and checked with insurance company who was happy to pay. I ended up not needing the bed as my discomfort was minimal.

Mark
 
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