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pellicle

Professional Dingbat
Joined
Nov 4, 2012
Messages
7,228
Location
Queensland, OzTrayLeeYa
What are your thoughts and what have your experiences been with repetition ranges?
my style has always been pyramiding up with a warm up being the starter set. I start on 20 reps and do them slowly (also to not introduce rocking) and go up to what I can do to just before failure.

I also record what I do (or did, not now) and compare over the weeks. I used a basic school maths exersize book for that.

I was often as strong as guys a little larger than me but more bulked. Back then I also worked doing deliveries and pickups from the suppliers. So I'd (say) load 2 ton of paint (in 20L buckets) into the truck, drive it back to our place, unload it onto the storage, then load the truck up again (with less) to do the days deliveries).
 

tom in MO

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Jan 17, 2012
Messages
1,415
Location
MO USA
I have known two people who have had abdominal aneurysms. When they burst, you are dead. I would assume the same with an aortic aneurysm.

You are searching vainly for a doctor who will tell you that your type of lifting with an aneurysm is acceptable. Please don't take this the wrong way, but you seem to be addicted to weight lifting or something else that weight lifting provides. Maybe another type of doctor, trainer, coach etc. can help you understand your motivations and how to find a new path.
 

Meathead TV

New member
Joined
Mar 1, 2020
Messages
4
I know there is not a doctor in the world that would recommend I would do powerlifting in my current state and that is not what I am looking for (been there, done that). I am trying to find out what doctors would suggest is safe for me to do in my current state and dream that one day (post-op) I can safely practice powerlifting.

Uhm, yes I am definitely addicted (if that is what you want to call it) to lifting weights and everything that comes with it. I love everything about it. If I wasn't, I wouldn't be here asking these questions, I'd just give it up.

There are no other paths for me, if I can't lift weights and train to some degree, I'm not living my life the way I want to and might as well be dead.
 

TanMan

Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2020
Messages
5
I am 20 years old and was in the same boat as you, minus the aneurysm. I played sports throughout high school and lifted heavy. As time went on the condition progressed but kept going. I started to lift a little lighter in the gym. I would typically shoot or 12-15 reps with good breathing techniques. I also was trying to take up running as a safer alternative. I ran about 30 miles a week and actually loved it. This whole time the doctors suggested I do none of that based on my condition. I would always come to the conclusion of how I would rather put myself at risk working out than put myself at risk sitting on the couch and developing health issues from inactivity. I am not encouraging you to do any of those things, but a lot of doctors don't understand young people like us. We like to be active! I am now 3 months post operation with a mechanical valve and am excited to be able to start working out again. Bottom line, be safe. Aneurysms are no joke and your too young to put the rest of your life in jeopardy. Stay fit, but listen to your body. You know it better than anyone else.
 

AZ Don

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Joined
Apr 23, 2013
Messages
695
Location
Phoenix, AZ
There are no other paths for me, if I can't lift weights and train to some degree, I'm not living my life the way I want to and might as well be dead.
As someone who was not able to live their life the way that they wanted to, due to physical limitations, I can tell you I am very glad that I was not dead this past almost 40 years. I injured my knee at 17 skiing and reinjured it at 21 playing tennis. Prior to this I ran regularly, including NYC Marathon, played competitive tennis and enjoyed skiing, especially moguls. After a year of no sports other than attempting rehab I underwent major reconstructive surgery. After a lengthy recovery I was able to resume skiing (no more moguls) and play doubles tennis as long as I didn't run too much, but running and singles tennis were done. I tried playing on a softball team a couple years later thinking that there was so little running I could get away with it, and that sent me back to surgery and made me face the reality that if I wanted to walk, I couldn't run. Ever. It was an extremely difficult adjustment, but you do what you have to do. I took up golf, bicycling, and swimming. I skiied easier trails. And I can still walk. I posted earlier the Pulitzer Prize winning articles by Kevin Helliker because many of his articles talked about the transition he went through, from competitive runner to casual runner after learning about his arotic aneurysm.

I think the consensus from the Dr's is that you can lift weights and train to some degree and it will certainly be less than you would like to. You previously suggested lifting a weight 5 times that you could lift 10. This sounds reasonable but there is so much better advice in the prior discussions and links I didn't comment on it. Higher reps and stopping before failure could probably work too. Once an aneurysm reaches 4.7cm (about what I think yours is), it generally tends to keep growing. Once you have it repaired it's a different world for you. Most Dr's will recommend minimal to no restrictions and many competitive athletes return to competition after this surgery.

In the meantime I hope you can sort out some reasonable limits and then find a way to live within those limits. For me, when I pushed my knee too far I had trouble walking. For you there may be no warnings.
 

Foxtail118

Active member
Joined
Jun 20, 2020
Messages
32
I am 20 years old and was in the same boat as you, minus the aneurysm. I played sports throughout high school and lifted heavy. As time went on the condition progressed but kept going. I started to lift a little lighter in the gym. I would typically shoot or 12-15 reps with good breathing techniques. I also was trying to take up running as a safer alternative. I ran about 30 miles a week and actually loved it. This whole time the doctors suggested I do none of that based on my condition. I would always come to the conclusion of how I would rather put myself at risk working out than put myself at risk sitting on the couch and developing health issues from inactivity. I am not encouraging you to do any of those things, but a lot of doctors don't understand young people like us. We like to be active! I am now 3 months post operation with a mechanical valve and am excited to be able to start working out again. Bottom line, be safe. Aneurysms are no joke and your too young to put the rest of your life in jeopardy. Stay fit, but listen to your body. You know it better than anyone else.
 

Foxtail118

Active member
Joined
Jun 20, 2020
Messages
32
Hey - to suggest you are better off dead is a very sad way to feel. Look for an alternative activity or activities. Change your mindset - try biking for an adrenaline rush.
 

spartangator

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 11, 2007
Messages
544
Location
Austin, Texas/Dublin, Ireland
I think the consensus from the Dr's is that you can lift weights and train to some degree and it will certainly be less than you would like to. You previously suggested lifting a weight 5 times that you could lift 10. This sounds reasonable but there is so much better advice in the prior discussions and links I didn't comment on it. Higher reps and stopping before failure could probably work too. Once an aneurysm reaches 4.7cm (about what I think yours is), it generally tends to keep growing. Once you have it repaired it's a different world for you. Most Dr's will recommend minimal to no restrictions and many competitive athletes return to competition after this surgery.
I've been following a bit the story of this American football player recently diagnosed with a valvular issue (don't know details) and how his treatment is progressing, apparently including a return to play as he expects to be cleared for unrestricted physical activity: Vikings' Smith 'in good shape' after heart surgery

To me, it follows the pattern of basketball player Jeff Green, who had an aneurysm repaired and went back the the NBA: From death's door to the NBA Finals

I'm not advocating for anything here, just pondering what is possible for people post-surgery and how varied the medical advice is.
 
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