Menopause and warfarin

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DachsieMom

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Mar 3, 2015
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So I think I might be headed into peri menopause. I go to the doctor in a few weeks. I am curious whether other women on warfarin take hormone replacement therapy? I am not planning on it because I am scared to take anything - don't even take birth control pills. But I doubt my doc had experience with someone my age (43) on warfarin. Might be a little blessing because my cycle was crazy! I became severely anemic. thank you.
 

Zoltania

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Hormone replacement therapy is the last of a series of options, so you may not even need to consider it if you don't have bothersome symptoms or if your symptoms can be controlled in another way. My gynecologist suggested trying first an over-the-counter estrogen mimic like Estroven, then increasing dietary soy, then SSRIs such as Prozac, and reserving HRT for the case where nothing else works and you're miserable. So far I haven't even needed to try step one, but that could change.
 

Protimenow

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Not being a woman on warfarin, I'm sticking my neck out a bit. It might matter which hormone replacement therapies you get -- my wife (and I) use bioidentical hormones. These are derived from Yams, and are supposed to be exact matches to the hormones that our bodies produce. However, when going through menopause, your hormone levels shift, I'm not sure at what point, and what type of replacement should be started.

You may want to consider avoiding the hormones that the pharmaceutical companies push - but that are not identical to your body's own hormones. Some old studies concluded that ALL hormone supplement therapies were harmful. This may not be the case with bioidenticals.

Please consider that this is NOT medical advice. The ultimate decision, of course, should be made by you and your doctor. Don't be too afraid to ask about bioidenticals.
 

Lisa2

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Hi, Dachsiemom. I can relate, although I'm not on warfarin yet. I am 43 and just starting HRT. I was supposed to pick up my prescriptions today and never made it to the pharmacy today. I am definitely in peri menopause and possibly in menopause- won't know for sure if It's menopause for about 8 months. I am starting HRT in hopes of combating insomnia. I have been getting hot flashes for some time now but now I am waking up in the middle of night and can not go back to sleep. I got up at 0230 on Monday. And I routinely get up at 0400 or 0430 these days! So hoping HRT can carry through the transition. And hoping this transition concludes soon!
 

Rachel

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Holland, Michigan
I'm in menopause - I'm 51 and I've been dealing with all sorts of menopausal related symptoms from dry everything to mood swings to insomnia due to hot flashes for almost a full year now - but I will not take HRT - I have a tissue valve and am not on any anticoagulant therapies - I have just decided that it is in my best interest to manage each symptom with the lowest risk possible treatment I can find.

I guess I like to see if I can ride out the storm - it's hard, but I'm also discovering my strength through this process.

Good luck to you Dachsiemom - this transition can be quite a ride and you need to do what works for you.
 

Protimenow

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This may sound a bit odd, coming from a man, but it's useful to think about what TYPE of hormones you're getting in HRT. The stuff that's been implicated in cancer and other problems was synthetic - Premarin (pregnant mare urine), and the body doesn't react to it as if it was just a higher dose of the stuff that our bodies naturally manufacture.
You may consider finding a doctor who works with bioidentical hormone therapy. The medications (creams, in the form of bi-est, or capsules in the form of progesterone) are usually not covered by insurance. The bioidenticals are usually derived from yams, modified so that they are identical to the hormones that our bodies naturally make. To the body, using a bioidentical is like a slight boost, restoring a hormone profile to a more youthful one.

This is just something to consider...
 

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