mechanical-heart-valve-noise-may-cause-sleepless-nights

Valve Replacement Forums

Help Support Valve Replacement Forums:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
"may cause" ... it may shock you but you can use a concept that's alien to you : self discipline.

Never too late to learn (you've even got monks there who could teach you).

Its strange how you're the only one here who's so obsessive about this ... I wonder how many mech valvers we have here who can sleep. You can count me as one of them. If people decided they can't put up with some aspect, then they just choose the other option

who cares about the study, if you don't like what you imagine it to be like, then don't get one ... simple.

Just get what you want. Remember >THERE IS NO PERFECT CHOICE<

Ask yourself what you want, what you can life with and then just pretend to be an adult and do that.

OR ask questions like an adult (meaning you're prepared to listen).
 
"may cause" ... it may shock you but you can use a concept that's alien to you : self discipline.

Never too late to learn (you've even got monks there who could teach you).

Its strange how you're the only one here who's so obsessive about this ... I wonder how many mech valvers we have here who can sleep. You can count me as one of them. If people decided they can't put up with some aspect, then they just choose the other option

I think I fall into the category like a few others on here, I take COMFORT in hearing my valve. While in ICU I had the chest tube vacuums running the whole time, got used to that sound. Before I got home, I had my wife by a simple sound machine. I use the babbling brooke since it sounds similar. I hear both and fall asleep in about 5-10 minutes if I had to guess.
 
can hear mine all the time. Not that bothered to be honest. No changing sides or anything alters it.
 
I take COMFORT in hearing my valve.
I'm not sure I take comfort in it, but its handy for giving me a heads up about being stressed. Further after I started getting tachycardia I noticed it really soon (which I may not have done if I couldn't hear it) and was able to get treatment for that.

Thing is that once you have some sort of heart issue (especially if you leave surgery too long) you'll end up having some others (either permanent or temporary) such as arrhythmia (like tachycardia or afib) or perhaps worse.

Also @Nick Drew and @mecretired I'm also one for different sounds on different sides, sadly my preference is sleeping on my right side, but that reliably triggers tachycardia and wakes me up. Sadly sleeping on my left side causes my left arm to go dead (which is uncomfortable) from a bicycle accident where I tore some ligaments, so 🤷‍♂️

Happily I'm still enjoying being awake ;-)
 
I have an On-X mechanical aortic valve. I would say 99% of the time I do not hear it -- but some other people do. My heart rate is around 55 bpm, so like a ticking clock. They first look at my watch. But it's an Apple watch. What is that?? I usually don't tell them. I just say I don't hear anything.

I've had the mechanical valve for just over seven years now. I was 51 when i had the AVR. No problems. I use the Coaguchek machine to check my INR. It's slighly out of range maybe twice a year. In the beginning I bruised very easily, but I don't seem to bruise that easily anymore. I don't notice the bruises like I used to. It's very easy to manage. I traveled in Asia for more than a month. Just brought my machine, and it was no problem.

I am very careful. The most dangerous thing I do is ride my bike, always with a helmet. I was asked to go white water rafting -- sorry I'll pass on that.

It was a difficult decision on what valve to choose. I have no regrets. I've had the valve for seven years now, and feel like it could go for another 30 years. I feel like I made the right decision.
 
I have a St Jude, and I don't hear it probably 90% of the time. Others can hear it pretty much all the time, but mine is quiet enough that they need to put their ear near my chest.

This was a big concern of mine as I'm a really light sleeper, but it hasn't been a problem at all.
 
ChuckM said:
I take COMFORT in hearing my valve.
This. I've had my St. Jude's mitral for 27 years and although I will occasionally get fixated on the ticking I remind myself that it simply means it's working. This time of year (in the Northern hemisphere) it's dry so my wife uses a humidifier in the bedroom. I found this white noise masks the ticking and could be a simple solution for those who are kept awake by the ever-present sound.
 
I usually hear mine when it's quiet and I focus on it. I've got some arrhythmias, and listen for them (in terms of the click timing), although there's not a lot I can do about them.

A few years ago, after two ablations, I detected a heart rate at 50 or below - both from just listening to the valve, and by feeling in my wrist or neck. A pacemaker fixed THAT.

I mostly ignore my ticking - I go about my things during the day and, only if I focus on it, don't hear the ticking at all.
 
Potential valve noise was something that concerned me prior to my surgery 33 months ago but I can honestly say for me it’s been a non-issue. Sometimes if I’m lying on my left side in bed, I can hear it. It doesn’t particularly bother me but if it does, I simple shift my position or turn over.
 
I think most people worry more about taking warfarin than they do about valve noise.

Warfarin, when managed properly (including at clinics and not just self testing or self management) is pretty much a non-issue, although some people will try to make it seem like rat poison that will ruin your life. Ticking is a real thing -- but you fairly quickly get used to it.
 
Potential valve noise was something that concerned me prior to my surgery 33 months ago but I can honestly say for me it’s been a non-issue. Sometimes if I’m lying on my left side in bed, I can hear it. It doesn’t particularly bother me but if it does, I simple shift my position or turn over.
You will eventually get so used to the noise that you will not even hear it, except on occasions.
 
Back
Top