Importance of "heart valve card"

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Paleowoman

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Before an MRI today, although I had taken the print out from Edwards which shows my valve is MR Conditional, the radiographer was very keen to see the card I was sent by Edwards post surgery that has info about my valve which I carry in my purse. The radiographer said she is always surprised by the number of people who tear up their card or leave it at home. It is really important to have the card available as anything might happen, road accident, collapse in the street, anything where one of us might be unconscious and so any medics would not know, even seeing a sternotomy scar, why surgery was done and what type of heart valve was implanted.
 

LondonAndy

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I wear a Medic Alert bracelet as I have a number of things people might need to know if I am unconscious etc, but interestingly when I had an MRI scan 18 months ago the only thing they wanted to know about was my pacemaker. (Even though it is MRI conditioned it definitely causes problems getting a scan done). However, I have learnt to take everything from my hospital discharge notes to my last INR result with me to medical appointments - here in the UK medical notes are still largely paper based, and even if one hospital is computerised it may not have access to the notes of treatments at another hospital. Very frustrating.
 

Paleowoman

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Hi Andy - I also carry a Medic Alert card because I have a number of conditions too, and a key fob on my keyring alerting medics that I carry such a card so they can look for it. That's a good idea to take medical notes with you to appointments, I have sometimes done that, particularly to GPs because, although they have notes on their computers, they do not have time to read them properly within the ten minute appointment and I sometimes often have to see a GP that doesn't know me, so just in case I take the last report from each consultant with me and any other important info.
 

libra rising

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the radiographer was very keen to see the card I was sent by Edwards post surgery ... It is really important to have the card available as anything might happen
Hi Paleo
following your post I thought I'd better chase my card which has never arrived subsequent to my May 26 2018 AVR op at Harefield.
I got through to my surgeon's office (Mr Bahrami who does 2 AVRs most days). She reported that in her time Edwards was the only manufacturer who sent out cards, but they no longer do so, and that she hadn't received any in the last 8 months.
So I guess I'll stop waiting.
Geoff
 

Paleowoman

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Hi Geoff @libra rising - you should have got at least a little handwritten slip of paper/card written by the hosital on discharge after AVR stating the kind of valve you got and its mdoel and serial number. You, not the hospital, then go onto Edwards registry to register your valve yourself and they send you a card - here is the link which is clearly still working: https://www.edwards.com/patients/implantpatientregistry
I hope you can get this as it's very important.
all the best,
Anne

Hi Paleo
following your post I thought I'd better chase my card which has never arrived subsequent to my May 26 2018 AVR op at Harefield.
I got through to my surgeon's office (Mr Bahrami who does 2 AVRs most days). She reported that in her time Edwards was the only manufacturer who sent out cards, but they no longer do so, and that she hadn't received any in the last 8 months.
So I guess I'll stop waiting.
Geoff
 

Thomas

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Aug 8, 2018
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Aurora, Ontario, Canada
I don't wear a bracelet. I have a card but don't carry it.... probably should.
What I did do though was input all of the info from the card and additionally all of the drugs that I take like warfarin dosing etc. into my cell phone personal contact area.
My nephew is a parametic and tells me that if they suspect anything out of the usual and can't get info from a contact, they try (if they can get into the phone) to look for personal medical info in emergencies. I don't think many people do it but it seemed to me to be a prudent course of action.
 

Asystole

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May 16, 2019
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I carry my valve and pacemaker card in my wallet next to my driver's license and CCW permit. I also wear a Road ID wristband noting that I have a mechanical aortic valve, a pacemaker and that I'm on warfarin.
 

Keithl

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Apr 20, 2019
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Before an MRI today, although I had taken the print out from Edwards which shows my valve is MR Conditional, the radiographer was very keen to see the card I was sent by Edwards post surgery that has info about my valve which I carry in my purse. The radiographer said she is always surprised by the number of people who tear up their card or leave it at home. It is really important to have the card available as anything might happen, road accident, collapse in the street, anything where one of us might be unconscious and so any medics would not know, even seeing a sternotomy scar, why surgery was done and what type of heart valve was implanted.
For now I keep the card in front of my license so if I am unresponsive they will see that and need to pull it out to see my ID. I plan on getting. A medical bracelet, just trying to figure out how to jam in as much info in the limited 3 lines they grieve me.
 

dick0236

Eat the elephant one bite at a time
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A few years back I was denied an MRI of my back because I did not have a valve ID card. They did not issue these cards in the early days......nor did they have model numbers or serial numbers in those days. Getting an ID card 45 years after the fact was like pulling teeth....... my serial number is "178-UNK" and model is "STARREW-UNK". I think UNK means "unknown, and we really don't know what may be in this guy". Make sure you contact the valve manufacturer directly to be sure your valve is entered in their system. Do not rely on that handwritten paper card the hospital may, or may not, have given you. It took me over six months to finally satisfy Edwards that I really did have one of their valves.
 

dick0236

Eat the elephant one bite at a time
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.....I got through to my surgeon's office (Mr Bahrami who does 2 AVRs most days). She reported that in her time Edwards was the only manufacturer who sent out cards, but they no longer do so, and that she hadn't received any in the last 8 months.
So I guess I'll stop waiting.
Geoff
What?? I think your surgeons' office is "blowing smoke up your A--". Contact Edwards Lifesciences directly.
I just went on the Edwards website and they encourage new valve patients.....either surgical or TAVR to register your valve with Edwards Lifesciences....and they will send you an ID card with all pertinent info. Registry information is on their home page of the site I looked at. woops, I see that you have already contacted Edwards.
 
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JaneF

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Jun 25, 2017
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Location
South-Central, KY
I carry my valve card in my wallet with my drivers license, health insurance card and a list of my medications. My family, friends, and close coworkers know in case of emergency and if I am alone hopefully paramedics would look there first.
 


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