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PaulFranklin

New member
Joined
Sep 12, 2022
Messages
1
Location
England
Hi all. Joining you from across the pond in the UK. I had a AVR in 2016 following a diagnosis of severe aortic regurgitation. Had a tissue valve fitted privately at Harefield Hospital, great service and staff. Then two years ago I felt a ‘funny’ heart rhythm and ended up having a pacemaker fitted due to heart block. That was followed by two ablations to sort out some arrhythmias. Fingers crossed all sorted. Just wanted to ask if anyone knew if there are any signs that a tissue valve might need replacing? Have noticed that I am getting quite short of breath walking uphill, climbing stairs, etc. very similar to before previous op. Have been signed off from hospital, so don’t know when they start checking again.

Thanks
 

pellicle

Professional Dingbat
Joined
Nov 4, 2012
Messages
10,407
Location
Queensland, OzTrayLeeYa
Hey Paul and welcome
Just wanted to ask if anyone knew if there are any signs that a tissue valve might need replacing? Have noticed that I am getting quite short of breath walking uphill, climbing stairs, etc. very similar to before previous op. Have been signed off from hospital, so don’t know when they start checking again.
well the definitive data comes from some echo studies of the heart, but what you are feeling is worth investigating.

I don't know the proper way of doing things in the UK, but I'd start with discussing this with your Dr and getting an appointment with a cardiologist (and perhaps pre-emptively booking in an echo to be able to take that data to said cardiologist (which may take longer to arrange than the echo).

To me known health positions declining are indicators of something. For me that proved to be the case. I knew that my time around the ski track (XC Classic) where I lived (in Finland) hadn't changed but I knew that my technique had improved. However the HR was staying the same (Polaris-alike fitness data) and so I sussed "something is up" and when back in Oz got a checkup and bingo.

That was at about the 20 year mark on the previous valve (homograft done in late 20's see my bio) and a new valve was subsequently fitted (see my bio).

That was over 10 years ago (and see my bio for age data).

Best Wishes
 

Seaton

VR.org Supporter
Supporting Member
Joined
May 12, 2015
Messages
460
Location
London, UK
Hi all. Joining you from across the pond in the UK. I had a AVR in 2016 following a diagnosis of severe aortic regurgitation. Had a tissue valve fitted privately at Harefield Hospital, great service and staff. Then two years ago I felt a ‘funny’ heart rhythm and ended up having a pacemaker fitted due to heart block. That was followed by two ablations to sort out some arrhythmias. Fingers crossed all sorted. Just wanted to ask if anyone knew if there are any signs that a tissue valve might need replacing? Have noticed that I am getting quite short of breath walking uphill, climbing stairs, etc. very similar to before previous op. Have been signed off from hospital, so don’t know when they start checking again.

Thanks
Hi Paul and welcome.
As Pellicle said, to be on the safe side, I'd discuss your concerns with your GP and ask to be referred for a cardiology check-up. Your history and symptoms should get you an appointment sooner rather than later. Best to get things checked out.
Wishing you a good outcome and future good health.
 
Last edited:

leadville

Premium Level User
Joined
Aug 28, 2017
Messages
454
Location
UK
@PaulFranklin

Welcome, Uk based too,

After you were signed off from the Private Hospital you will have or should have been assigned
A NHS Cardiologist.

as per the above advise ;
I would speak to your GP for a Cardiology referral
 
Last edited:

Lynn

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Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2021
Messages
141
Location
British Columbia
Welcome to the forum. I would also suggest running these symptoms by a cardio, maybe ask for an echo. There is something called Pacemaker syndrome, which based on my limited understanding is a pacemaker induced reduction in ejection fraction. It doesn’t happen that often, but neither is it a rare occurrence. I also have a post AVR surgery pacemaker and after my one year post surgery echo the cardio said everything was great and I wouldn’t need another echo (mechanical valve) for maybe 5 years. I questioned him on the pacemaker syndrome issue and he then agreed that an echo in 2 years makes sense. He also said that I should follow up with him if I have a change like increased shortness of breath.

Best of luck with this.
 

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