Mechanical Bentall Resources

Valve Replacement Forums

Help Support Valve Replacement Forums:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

NorthVanJosh

Active member
Joined
Jan 18, 2024
Messages
26
Location
Vancouver
Hi all,

I finally was able to have my consult with my surgeon. I had originally thought that I was only to be getting a simple valve replacement. Sadly I will also be needing a Aortic replacement and the suggested route is to do a Mechanical Bentall. He said I could do just a sparing bental but since I have BAV I would likely need another surgery down the road. As such I will likely be going for Mechanical Bentall.

I'm wondering if anyone has any good resources I could refer to learn more about the procedure, life expectancy with having such a drastic operation, and any personal experiences! Thanks in advance!
 
4 weeks ago today I had my bav replaced with a mechanical valve and had my ascending aorta aneurysm repaired. I am 63yrs old and the surgeon would have done a tissue valve but he was happy that I choose the mechanical valve. As far as long term survival who knows, but the valve will likely last longer than me.
 
life expectancy with having such a drastic operation

If you adhere to the INR guidelines and eat a healthy diet with lots of greens, then you can expect a normal for your family genetics life expectancy, probably longer

, and any personal experiences
This whole site is filled with them. Just search.

Best Wishes
 
My hero on this site is Superbob, who had two Bentalls (bio) due to aneurysm and AR and quite recently said that his heart was OK, in his eighties.
 
Just had my mechanical Bentall 2 weeks ago. Recovery is going well other than a few rhythm issues that they sorted out :)

As far as I understand, the presence of an aortic graft doesn't have any detrimental impact on long-term survival in and of itself, nor does it require anticoagulation or cause long-term thrombotic risk in and of itself.

I've even seen studies where BAV patients who only get their valve replaced actually have worse long-term survival than those who get their valve and root replaced. Presumably because some of those valve patients succumbed to aortic complications down the line.

The surgery is certainly lengthier and more complex, but as long as the hospital and team have experience with these kind of procedures, they will knock it out of the park. I was only on bypass for 2 hours for my Bentall and it went 100% smoothly. Keep in mind this is still simpler than some other heart procedures. My mindset was that if they're gonna open me up I may as well get everything done at once rather than waiting until later!
 
Hi.
I had a Bentall Procedure with a mechanical valve a little over 3 years ago.

He said I could do just a sparing bental but since I have BAV I would likely need another surgery down the road. As such I will likely be going for Mechanical Bentall.
I believe that is a good decision. Take care of the valve while they are in there, to avoid needing another OHS to replace it later.

I'm wondering if anyone has any good resources I could refer to learn more about the procedure, life expectancy
If you look online you're likely to come across some statistics that might appear alarming at first glance, giving you the average survival time following valve surgery. Some claim 6 to 11 years. It's important to realize that many people who get valve surgery are in their 70s and 80s, which makes these statistics completely meaningless for a young patient.

This study may give you some comfort with respect to lifespan for those receiving a Bentall Procedure. It was not specific to tissue or mechanical. This is likely the study which Deidra was referring to, which found that life expectancy for Bentall patients was actually better than for those who received only aortic valve replacement. This may be due to the fact that many times another OHS is needed down the road if the aorta is not repaired when the valve is replaced. It also found that Bentall patients had equivalent life expectancy after surgery, compared to the general population.

"Long-term survival was 93% after 5 years and 89% after 10 years. Discharged patients enjoyed survival equivalent to a normal age- and sex-matched population and superior to survival reported for a series of patients with aortic valve replacement alone."

https://www.annalsthoracicsurgery.org/article/S0003-4975(07)00667-4/fulltext#:~:text=Long-term survival was 93,with aortic valve replacement alone.

You have a good deal of agency when it comes to life expectancy by choosing a healthy lifestyle with
- daily exercise
- weight control
- blood pressure control
-eating whole foods instead of ultra processed foods
-keeping your doctor appointments.

For those on warfarin, I would add:
- being compliant and managing your INR well.

If you choose a tissue valve, I would add:
-getting your future procedures done when it's time and don't delay or deny symptoms
 
Last edited:
Just had my mechanical Bentall 2 weeks ago. Recovery is going well other than a few rhythm issues that they sorted out :)

As far as I understand, the presence of an aortic graft doesn't have any detrimental impact on long-term survival in and of itself, nor does it require anticoagulation or cause long-term thrombotic risk in and of itself.

I've even seen studies where BAV patients who only get their valve replaced actually have worse long-term survival than those who get their valve and root replaced. Presumably because some of those valve patients succumbed to aortic complications down the line.

The surgery is certainly lengthier and more complex, but as long as the hospital and team have experience with these kind of procedures, they will knock it out of the park. I was only on bypass for 2 hours for my Bentall and it went 100% smoothly. Keep in mind this is still simpler than some other heart procedures. My mindset was that if they're gonna open me up I may as well get everything done at once rather than waiting until later!

Glad recovery is going well! Totally on the same mind set of having a one and done operation, and I'm glad what you and Chuck said about life expectancy not really being impacted.

I think my main problem, like Chuck mentioned was that most of the studies out there are using data from paitents in their 60s and higher so its a bit scary reading it as a 31 year old!
 
I think my main problem, like Chuck mentioned was that most of the studies out there are using data from paitents in their 60s and higher so its a bit scary reading it as a 31 year old!

I was also 31 when I had the surgery.......almost 57 years ago. My doctors were pretty blunt with me when they explained my situation. The risk (in 1967) of surgery was 7%....my risk of dropping dead, without warning, was 25% and they felt I would be dead by forty if I did not have corrective surgery. I had the surgery and have never looked back.

Today's risk of the surgery is about 2%.......but my guess is the risk of dying without surgery probably hasn't decreased much over the years.

You should do fine!
 
60s and higher so its a bit scary reading it as a 31 year old!
Never even thought of reading that stuff. Not once.

I know what I have to do and the chance of a life without taking those steps is zero.

Being a university student at the time (1992, I was 28) I could easily have gone to the library and read stuff. Just like political polls before elections, the only thing that matters is what happens at the election. Never waste my time on political commentary either.

Being "educated" won't change what is or what might happen. Everything else feels like a delusion of control.


Best wishes
 
I had my mechanical Bentall last October and am about 7 months post. Like you, when I was preparing for my surgery, I felt a mix of anxiety and hope. But I can confidently say that going through with it was one of the best decisions I've ever made. The recovery process can be challenging, but it's also incredibly rewarding. Each day brings small victories and steps forward, and you'll be amazed at how resilient and strong you are.

In the months following my surgery, I've been able to return to activities I love, with more energy and a renewed sense of well-being. The support from my friends, family, and medical team made a huge difference, and I encourage you to lean on your loved ones for strength and encouragement.

Remember to be patient with yourself during recovery. Listen to your body, follow your doctor's advice, and take things one day at a time. Celebrate the progress you make, no matter how small it may seem. You'll get through this, and you'll come out the other side feeling better than ever.
 

Latest posts

Back
Top