Coaguchek Model Differences - & Other Questions

Valve Replacement Forums

Help Support Valve Replacement Forums:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

mrcora

Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2023
Messages
8
Location
Miami
Hi.

So the time has come for me to start self testing at home. I've been going to a clinic for 7 years and am just sick of it. (Pun intended.) I was able to find a good deal for a used Coaguchek XS model that came with some strips and it seems to be working fine. I will go to the clinic next week to compare the readings. I will do this 2-3 more times to make sure my machine is on par with the clinic's assessment. Besides the XS model, I have a Vantus model coming to me that is new in the box that a friends mother had gotten but never used. So I lucked out on that model & would be glad to have a "backup plan" in case one of the meters dies on me. (Being made in Germany & reading the reviews on this forum it may be unlikely in the near future.) I was actually thinking of getting a Pro meter because I am a bit of a tech junkie and like gadgets but it seems to be much bigger.

A few questions:

  • Do any of you use any other brand of meter besides Coaguchek? Which one? How were your readings?
  • Has anyone compared a Coaguchek to other brands in regards to readings. Is Coaguchek considered the best for in home testing?
  • What are the + or - of the following Coaguchek models: XS, XS Plus, INRange (Vantus), Pro? (Did I miss any?)
  • Do all the Coaguchek no matter the model, work the same in regards to the INR readings? Is it only a few extra bell & whistles?
  • When you get your readings, are you calling in your doctors office every week/month and reporting it?

Thank you.
 
Great idea to get your own meter! Not sure if you came across this document I have posted a number of times, which although originally written in 2014 I think is still the UK's current medical guidance -
  1. that the CoaguChek range are the only meters recommended, and
  2. that self testing helps massively reduce strokes etc.
I have had an XS machine since 2014, and as I understand it the other models offer things like Bluetooth connection to send results, and a colour screen. Otherwise they are the same in functionality. Neither of those things are important to me, so I have no plans to get one until my current meter dies or becomes obsolete. The "Pro" model is for clinic situations - multi-patient, higher volume use.

In my case, I test weekly but only report the result to my anticoagulation clinic every 6 weeks (ie on week 6 I report that week's result). I also visit them to compare results with their own Pro machine every six months to ensure it is still within tolerance (about 0.2 +/-). All good so far. Other clinics/countries may have different reporting requirements.
 
Thanks for the link to the document and your feedback. Have you had the same XS since 2014? Can I ask what kind of lancets you use?

I have been trying to find the white lancet softclick made by Coaguchek but no one has it for sale. Do you have any idea if its still available? I've been looking for the white or black version that says Coaguchek on it. If I could find the part number that would help me narrow down my searches. (Picture below)

I cant believe how excited I am to start my own testing.
 

Attachments

  • clicker2.PNG
    clicker2.PNG
    194.3 KB · Views: 0
Last edited:
Hi

So the time has come for me to start self testing at home. I've been going to a clinic for 7 years and am just sick of it. (Pun intended.) I was able to find a good deal for a used Coaguchek XS model that came with some strips and it seems to be working fine.
excellent, I have one too and I've used it for about 13 years now.

Despite your relative experience I still suggest you brows through the topics on my blog on this matter (all of which are in "most recent first" order here). The problem with that order is not unlike the problem most people have with the movie TENET.

BTW, if in Germany I'd hope you know of this site:
https://www.doccheck.com/search?q=coaguchek
which I used when I lived in Finland to get strip

I will go to the clinic next week to compare the readings.
fair and reasonable. I also did that for a while and still on occasion make a compare. Results are like this:

date
Coagu INR
lab INR
14/12/2012​
3.2​
3.4​
17/12/2012​
2.7​
2.8​
20/12/2012​
2.6​
21/12/2012​
2.8​
2.8​
28/12/2012​
2.5​
2.6​
5/01/2013​
2.4​
11/01/2013​
2.3​
13/01/2013​
2.4​
21/06/2014​
2.3​
2.5​
31/01/2015​
3.0​
2.9​
3/08/2015​
2.4​
2.6​
6/02/2016​
3.0​
2.8​
8/11/2017​
2.7​
2.6​
20/04/2021​
2.3​
2.3​
16/05/2022​
3.2​
3.0​
1/02/2022​
2.4​
2.4​

Besides the XS model, I have a Vantus model coming to me that is new in the box that a friends mother had gotten but never used.
reasonable ... be aware they suck up batteries faster, but then as the XS is pretty frugal that's not a biggie

So I lucked out on that model & would be glad to have a "backup plan" in case one of the meters dies on me. (Being made in Germany & reading the reviews on this forum it may be unlikely in the near future.) I was actually thinking of getting a Pro meter because I am a bit of a tech junkie and like gadgets but it seems to be much bigger.
ok, so which is it? Vantus is coming, Vantus isn't coming

A few questions:
  • Do any of you use any other brand of meter besides Coaguchek? Which one? How were your readings?
see above
  • Has anyone compared a Coaguchek to other brands in regards to readings. Is Coaguchek considered the best for in home testing?
I have not, but there are comparisons, the ones most reliable are from a fellow who's moved on now (no longer comes here) and his assessment was pretty clear that XS is the winner between it and Coag-Sense ... others may disagree

  • What are the + or - of the following Coaguchek models: XS, XS Plus, INRange (Vantus), Pro? (Did I miss any?)
American market CoagSense

  • Do all the Coaguchek no matter the model, work the same in regards to the INR readings? Is it only a few extra bell & whistles?
yes ... none of which are worth dick to me (actually @dick0236 is worth a lot more to me than those fatures)

  • When you get your readings, are you calling in your doctors office every week/month and reporting it?
nope ... I'm Australian and I just self manage.

You may like to read these post in particular:

https://cjeastwd.blogspot.com/2023/06/inr-lance-sizes.html
https://cjeastwd.blogspot.com/2023/04/pt-test-pst.html
https://cjeastwd.blogspot.com/2023/03/roche-coaguchek-xs.html
Make sure you don't use a phone for that as sometimes the embedded videos don't show.

I prefer to use my own spreadsheet for monitoring / graphing and managing my INR because it provides features that Roche does not and can not.

Reach out if you want to "give that a burl" as we say in Oz.

Best Wishes and Happy New Year
 
Thanks for the link to the document and your feedback. Have you had the same XS since 2014? Can I ask what kind of lancets you use?

I have been trying to find the white lancet softclick made by Coaguchek but no one has it for sale. Do you have any idea if its still available? I've been looking for the white or black version that says Coaguchek on it. If I could find the part number that would help me narrow down my searches. (Picture below)

I cant believe how excited I am to start my own testing.
Yes, it has been the same machine since 2014. Still looks as good as new, despite being well travelled with me on holidays! It came in a soft carry case with a lancing device, place to keep the tub of test strips, and pockets to hold the lancets. I am still using the same lancing device and the CoaguChek lancets. You probably already know that you need a bigger drop of blood for the INR tests than, say, diabetics do for a blood glucose, so you can't use any old lancing device.

The CoaguChek products are made by Roche, and they have a UK distributor, which isn't much use to you in Miami but you can see the products they sell (unless they block US users because there you seem to have to do everything via a "service" or something ...)
 
Ευχαριστούμε για τον σύνδεσμο προς το έγγραφο και τα σχόλιά σας. Έχετε το ίδιο XS από το 2014; Μπορώ να ρωτήσω τι είδους νυστέρια χρησιμοποιείτε;

Προσπάθησα να βρω το softclick με λευκή νυστέρι που κατασκευάστηκε από την Coaguchek αλλά κανείς δεν το έχει προς πώληση. Έχετε ιδέα αν είναι ακόμα διαθέσιμο; Έψαχνα για την άσπρη ή μαύρη έκδοση που λέει Coaguchek. Αν μπορούσα να βρω τον αριθμό ανταλλακτικού, θα με βοηθούσε να περιορίσω τις αναζητήσεις μου. (Εικόνα παρακάτω)

Δεν μπορώ να πιστέψω πόσο ενθουσιασμένος είμαι που ξεκινώ τις δικές μου δοκιμές.
https://www.amazon.com/Accu-Chek-SoftClix-Lancing-Device-Lancets/dp/B000O8TUEU?th=1
 
Last edited:
I think mrcora wrote that he is looking for softclix, sorry my English is not good .

<<I've been looking for the white or black version that says Coaguchek on it >>
I think all the lancets on that Amazon page are for diabetic testing: 28g lancets, not the larger 21g needed for INR testing.
 
I hope I'm not the person that Pellicle claimed has moved on.

I've tested INR meters ranging from ProTIme and ProTime 3 (both discontinued), CoaguChek S (discontinued), InRatio (forced to be pulled by the FDA), CoaguChek XS, Pro, Plus, Coag-Sense Classic and Pro. I've compared some to each other (when the devices were both available) and to the labs. I've been doing this since around 2012, when an InRatio gave me a 2.6 and my actual INR was 1.7, and I got a stroke.

For a few years, I was convinced that Coag-Sense was the most accurate -- the one that I bet my life on. Its accuracy seemed to drop in the last few years, after a management change. The results that I've been getting were nearly 1.0 below most lab results and the XS. The lab results were often an average of the XS and the Coag-Sense. Although I decided that I prefer to manage my dosing based on a result that may be lower than the lab result, I've come to trust the XS.

Further, Roche provides great support. Coagusense (the company) hasn't - at one time, I complained to the manufacturer's support site that my results were usually 1 point (not a tenth of a point) below the lab results -- the answer was to just 'add 1 to the value so you match the lab.'

I still have the meters, but I haven't bought new strips and don't plan to.

I had an XS Plus, and it's the only Roche meter that died on me.

The Pro is a big step up from the XS - you get a color display, more options that you won't need, and a slightly slower start time. Also - if the Pro that you get came from a clinic or hospital, you will probably have to call Roche support to unlock it so you can customize it to your needs. They may give you a bit of a hassle because it's really not that suitable for just one user. For me, the biggest attraction is that you don't have to leave the code chip in the meter - use it once, and you can use the chip in your XS.

At one time the Vantus wasn't available for sale -- Roche tightly controlled it and used it for their anticoagulation management service. They went out of this business, so they're now, apparently, available.

IIRC, they can be software upgraded, but I'm not sure.

As far as meter life, I would be concerned. These meters are designed to run thousands of tests - one test a week, for 20 years, would barely break what some busy clinics would do in a few months.

As far as comparing your device to others (like the ones in a clinic) will probably give you results within .1 or .2 of each other, if the results don't match. That's more accurate than you should even concern yourself about.

Personally, I use single use lancing devices - they cost about a quarter each. I've had lancing devices, and used 21 gauge lancets. In fact, I've had hundreds of lancets over the years, but stopped using them when I discovered the single use lancets. I prefer these for a few reasons: you don't have to mess with inserting the lancet into a lancing device, you don't have to deal with disposing of the potentially dangerous lancet (if the cap comes off, for example), and the single use device is easy to use, goes to the right depth, and is safe to discard. For a quarter a test, it's worth it to me.
 
Last edited:
I have been trying to find the white lancet softclick made by Coaguchek but no one has it for sale. Do you have any idea if its still available? I've been looking for the white or black version that says Coaguchek on it. If I could find the part number that would help me narrow down my searches. (Picture below)

There is a vender on ebay that seems to be offering the black Coaguchek lancing device but the vendor does not seem to realize the distinction between the coaguchek and the accuchek lancing devices. The listing uses a stock picture of the accu-chek but also has a picture posted of the coaguchek xs softclix lancing device.

Has anyone compared a Coaguchek to other brands in regards to readings. Is Coaguchek considered the best for in home testing?
There was a recent study in Clinical Chemistry comparing the Coaguchek and CoagSense meters to lab results.
A-373 Comparison of the CoaguChek ® and Coag-Sense ® PT2 Meter Point of Care INR Devices
Its conclusion included the statement: Compared to our institution's plasma reference method, INR values obtained from the CoaguChek devices (XS Pro and XS Plus) exhibited less systematic bias compared to the Coag-Sense values.
As noted in other replies, the XS Pro and XS Plus are designed for hospital and clinic use for multiple patients but the INR measuring function is the same as the XS and the Vantus (US version of INRange) as they all use XS test strips.

I have two Coaguchek Vantus meters. One is furnished by a monitoring service where they forward results to the clinic and file with my insurance for every 4 tests. I purchased my own meter on ebay so that I have more flexibility for the time intervals of my self-testing. At the time I purchased my meter, I opted for the Vantus since it was latest model and the one offered was 'like new' (and appeared as if never used) and came with case, lancing device, manuals - everything but test strips which had probably expired). I now have more confidence in the general reliability/durability of the Coaguchek meters such that I would have been fine with a cheaper used XS meter.
I do use the bluetooth feature on my 'insurance' Vantus meter to send each test result via a smartphone app to the monitoring service who forwards it to the clinic/doctor. I don't have any need for the bluetooth feature on my personal meter since I never report these results to anybody else. I self-manage as I am not relying on my clinic for advising warfarin dosage adjustments based on what gets reported to them.

Currently, my cost per test is cheaper with my insurance coverage on the monitoring service than purchasing a box of test strips for my personal meter without insurance. As such, I generally use both meters on an alternating basis. I have done comparative or simultaneous testing only a few times with my meters; the results matched on all but one occasion where the difference was 2.4 vs 2.6 result (which is within the expected tolerance).
 
Its conclusion included the statement: Compared to our institution's plasma reference method, INR values obtained from the CoaguChek devices (XS Pro and XS Plus) exhibited less systematic bias compared to the Coag-Sense values.
thank you for that ... its gone into my evernote database

Best Wishes
 
Coaguchek models: XS, XS Plus,
Roche says the XS Plus is ONLY for use by professionals. I bought a used XS Plus cheap, but it was locked with a password. Roche tech support refused to tell me how to reset it.

On ebay in the USA you can get a used Coaguchek XS for US $150-$200. Mine only had a couple small scuff marks on it, and it works fine.

lancet softclick made by Coaguchek but no one has it for sale.
A substitute is :Roche ACCU-CHEK SAFE-T-PRO PLUS CoaguChek XS PT/INR Adjustable Lancets
https://www.ebay.com/itm/3746400821...uChek XS PT/INR Adjustable Lancets,-- 200 BoxThese are single use, but they work fine.
 
When the Coagusense (which is what it was called before Roche made them change the name) meter was approved by the FDA based on its reliable (meaning that it was always the same) correlation with the results of the XS. This is how the FDA approves some devices - if a known device is considered accurate, the new one being evaluated for approval must be similar in performance and accuracy to the 'standard.' At the time the Coag-Sense was approved, this correlation was sufficient.

I'm not sure this can be considered to be the case today.

As far as lancing devices - I don't think there's much difference between them. They all take the same lancets, they all have depth settings, and they all probably have the same aperture where the lancet goes to make the incision. Many have a lancet ejection mechanism.

I don't think it's necessary to get one lancing device versus any other. (FWIW - I called Bayer a few years ago to ask about their lancing device and they sent me one, along with some unusable (for INR testing) 31 gauge lancets. You may also be able to find a blood glucose meter for a few dollars - they sometimes give them away like razors, expecting you to buy the blades - for less than you'd pay for a separate lancing device.

And, as I said before, I use the single use devices, although I also have a lancing device and a lot of lancets.
 
I hope I'm not the person that Pellicle claimed has moved on.

I've tested INR meters ranging from ProTIme and ProTime 3 (both discontinued), CoaguChek S (discontinued), InRatio (forced to be pulled by the FDA), CoaguChek XS, Pro, Plus, Coag-Sense Classic and Pro. I've compared some to each other (when the devices were both available) and to the labs. I've been doing this since around 2012, when an InRatio gave me a 2.6 and my actual INR was 1.7, and I got a stroke.

For a few years, I was convinced that Coag-Sense was the most accurate -- the one that I bet my life on. Its accuracy seemed to drop in the last few years, after a management change. The results that I've been getting were nearly 1.0 below most lab results and the XS. The lab results were often an average of the XS and the Coag-Sense. Although I decided that I prefer to manage my dosing based on a result that may be lower than the lab result, I've come to trust the XS.

Further, Roche provides great support. Coagusense (the company) hasn't - at one time, I complained to the manufacturer's support site that my results were usually 1 point (not a tenth of a point) below the lab results -- the answer was to just 'add 1 to the value so you match the lab.'

I still have the meters, but I haven't bought new strips and don't plan to.

I had an XS Plus, and it's the only Roche meter that died on me.

The Pro is a big step up from the XS - you get a color display, more options that you won't need, and a slightly slower start time. Also - if the Pro that you get came from a clinic or hospital, you will probably have to call Roche support to unlock it so you can customize it to your needs. They may give you a bit of a hassle because it's really not that suitable for just one user. For me, the biggest attraction is that you don't have to leave the code chip in the meter - use it once, and you can use the chip in your XS.

At one time the Vantus wasn't available for sale -- Roche tightly controlled it and used it for their anticoagulation management service. They went out of this business, so they're now, apparently, available.

IIRC, they can be software upgraded, but I'm not sure.

As far as meter life, I would be concerned. These meters are designed to run thousands of tests - one test a week, for 20 years, would barely break what some busy clinics would do in a few months.

As far as comparing your device to others (like the ones in a clinic) will probably give you results within .1 or .2 of each other, if the results don't match. That's more accurate than you should even concern yourself about.

Personally, I use single use lancing devices - they cost about a quarter each. I've had lancing devices, and used 21 gauge lancets. In fact, I've had hundreds of lancets over the years, but stopped using them when I discovered the single use lancets. I prefer these for a few reasons: you don't have to mess with inserting the lancet into a lancing device, you don't have to deal with disposing of the potentially dangerous lancet (if the cap comes off, for example), and the single use device is easy to use, goes to the right depth, and is safe to discard. For a quarter a test, it's worth it to me.
Thanks for your feedback. It seems you have had quite a few meters over the years. I had not heard of the INratio before, but its sounds like a nightmare. I am sticking with the Roche machines. As I mentioned before, I have purchased a used XS that I have now and have a new/sealed Vantus/INRange coming in the mail today. I am looking forward to comparing the two and then going to the clinic three more times.

In regards t the lancet, I agree the disposable ones are great. Its all I'm used to sicne I have been going to the clinic for 7 years now. I had just seen the "official" Coaguchek Softclix and thought it would be nice to have a complete kit. Its the techi/collector side of me that can't help it. I saw that one seller on ebay and asked if he was in fact selling the original but he hasn't answered back yet.
 

Latest posts

Back
Top