Cardiologists - Enemies or Humans?

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Chuck C

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Dec 5, 2020
Messages
1,149
he only part that requires suspension of disbelief is that the other doctors actually read the file. Considering the number of times I have to repeat myself to the doctor after the nurse just put all those same notes in my file.
So true! They rarely read your file before the appointment. If you're lucky, they will be skimming through it as you are sitting there in front of them, but that uses up the limited time you have during your appointment.
Game changer for me: I started writing one page summary letters that I send to them before the appointment. So far, the letter has been read prior to the appointment every time;
-Gives them the summary of your relevant medical data in a quick and easy to read format
-I can detail all of the questions and points that i want to discuss, including referencing any publications that I think should be taken into consideration or that I would like to discuss with them.
- The questions that I have will hopefully demonstrate that he can skip the 8th grade level 10 minute talk on "What is aortic stenosis?" and we can start the appointment getting right into the pertinent questions. Yeah, I got that talk from the esteemed Alfredo Trento at Cedar Sinai and had no time for my questions, which is when I started giving the pre-appointment letter.

Pro tip: At the research institutions most of the cardiologists and surgeons are published. Start out the letter giving praise for one of their recent publications: "I recently read your paper regarding performing early mitral valve operations before the development of atrial fibrillation published in JAMA in January and found it brilliant.." Butters them up real good and gets you on their right side and leads to them putting Gold Stars and Smiley Face stickers in your file instead of "Difficult Patient" 🤣
 

Superman

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Joined
Oct 3, 2009
Messages
1,372
Location
Grand Rapids, MI, USA
So true! They rarely read your file before the appointment. If you're lucky, they will be skimming through it as you are sitting there in front of them, but that uses up the limited time you have during your appointment.
Game changer for me: I started writing one page summary letters that I send to them before the appointment. So far, the letter has been read prior to the appointment every time;
-Gives them the summary of your relevant medical data in a quick and easy to read format
-I can detail all of the questions and points that i want to discuss, including referencing any publications that I think should be taken into consideration or that I would like to discuss with them.
- The questions that I have will hopefully demonstrate that he can skip the 8th grade level 10 minute talk on "What is aortic stenosis?" and we can start the appointment getting right into the pertinent questions. Yeah, I got that talk from the esteemed Alfredo Trento at Cedar Sinai and had no time for my questions, which is when I started giving the pre-appointment letter.

Pro tip: At the research institutions most of the cardiologists and surgeons are published. Start out the letter giving praise for one of their recent publications: "I recently read your paper regarding performing early mitral valve operations before the development of atrial fibrillation published in JAMA in January and found it brilliant.." Butters them up real good and gets you on their right side and leads to them putting Gold Stars and Smiley Face stickers in your file instead of "Difficult Patient" 🤣
Sounds like it takes more time than repeating myself once a year. 😂
 

Chuck C

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Joined
Dec 5, 2020
Messages
1,149
Sounds like it takes more time than repeating myself once a year
Yeah, big difference in terms of the ground that needs to be covered with pre-surgery consultations vs maintenance check ups. I don't expect I'll be writing the letter for my annual appointments, lol. Once you get the mechanical valve I suppose you sort of put things in cruise control mode.
 

Dodgy Ticker

Member
Joined
May 3, 2020
Messages
23
Location
France (unfortunately)
I'm beginning to wonder if something is up with the cardiology in France. I've only read threads started by two posters based in France
WhilstI do indeed live in France, and have had all of my recent medical issues felt with fantastically well by te French public health system, the problem I am referring to is a global problem. I have, in no particular order, been to doctors in the following countries, and in all of them I have found the same type of arrogance and nonchalance amongst the medical specialists:
France
UK
Spain
Qatar
Oman
Hong Kong
USA

So there you have it..
 

Chuck C

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 5, 2020
Messages
1,149
WhilstI do indeed live in France, and have had all of my recent medical issues felt with fantastically well by te French public health system, the problem I am referring to is a global problem. I have, in no particular order, been to doctors in the following countries, and in all of them I have found the same type of arrogance and nonchalance amongst the medical specialists:
France
UK
Spain
Qatar
Oman
Hong Kong
USA

So there you have it..
Nonchalance is not a good quality for a physician. Arrogance on the other hand, sometimes that comes with the top surgeons. It may have something to do with the fact that they are often treated like gods in their clinics and sometimes the extremely confident come across as arrogant. I'll live with an arrogant surgeon as long as they are competent. But, nonchalant ones ought to be avoided. Hopefully this board can help other members to avoid those specialists who just don't seem to care, at least in the cardiology and valve surgery realm.
 
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Carnelian

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 29, 2017
Messages
55
Location
midwest US
I have had 4 different cardiologists, none talkative. One laughed in the clinic (My comment is hilarious?).They do the minimum because I am interrupting their day, it seems. Maybe they are bored or uninterested . Typically they walk out the door in the middle of talking. Professional rudeness. However, they all had the same opinion. I am alive and well 4 years later so I am grateful. Dr. Cardio ordered a stress test--did not tell me why I need it. Why?
And he's one of the nicer ones. they are only interested in hearts. My cancer tests and other conditions are of no interest. So why go to follow up appointments if the interview lasts 10 minutes? I am supposed to go for rest of my life. I told him about this forum. Not interested. Some specialists waste your money and others are very thorough.
 

Michael O

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 22, 2021
Messages
101
My father was a doctor and I've known a lot of cardiologists from when I was young. They're just a different breed. Candidly, it's easier to assume that all of your rules about socialization go out the window with cardiologists and work with what they give you. You create a lot less distress for yourself by assuming that they're just going to interact with you differently than almost everyone else in your life, and not take it personally.
 

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