29, male, upcoming BAVR

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Buckwheat

VR.org Supporter
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2024
Messages
3
Location
North Dakota
Hi all!

I'm a 29 year old male with a bicuspid aortic valve along with an ascending aortic aneurysm (5.2 cm). I am pretty active, I just finished my first half marathon today too! At 6' 240lbs I gotta say I'm pretty happy I finally pulled it off! I work a very cushy job in the oilfield up in the Bakken (just like everyone else in my home state). Jogging, fishing, and spending time with my family are by far my most favorite activities, along with spending time on my family farm and helping out where I can.

I'm currently scheduled for aortic valve replacement, along with my ascending aorta to be replaced up to the arch (hemi-arch procedure). I will be having my procedure done at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota at the end of this month.

The plan is to go with a mechanical valve, my surgeon also brought up the Ross procedure but did not recommend (nor did I really care for) as I have aortic insufficiency and apparently the Ross procedure tends to fail a bit quicker when that's the case.

I have read A LOT, especially on this forum. I want to thank EVERYONE for all their stories and words of wisdom that has been shared. Pellicle, I look forward to reading more into the INR management threads you have posted and I also hope I may get to "pick your brain" somewhat after I become a part of the warfarin family.

Dick0236, you're quite the inspiration and I hope to have a mechanical valve that lasts as long if not longer than yours. Superman, I appreciate all of your stories as well. Reading your stories have shown me that having a mechanical valve and managing warfarin don't have to be a hindrance and that you can still live a "normal" exciting life.

I will say, I am anxious about my upcoming surgery. I have full faith in my team, but it's new to me and I can't control it. My biggest concerns with the procedure are the hypothermic arrest portion, and I'm just hoping life doesn't change too terribly drastically afterwards. I do have some fear about experiencing "pump-head" and things like that.

My driving factor, however, is that this surgery will allow me to be there for my family and to experience life longer. I still have A LOT more fishing I want to do in life too.
 
Hi and welcome

just a quick tip, type the @ symbol then follow with the next letters of the username, this creates an "at mention". Eg when typing
@Superman
I got this:
1706835781219.png

and selected Superman

@dick0236 also needs a mention ;-)

Best of luck with the surgery.

Pellicle, I look forward to reading more into the INR management threads you have posted and I also hope I may get to "pick your brain" somewhat after I become a part of the warfarin family.

welcome to any time ... shoot me a message ("conversation") any time and I'm happy to chew the fat.
you're a year older than I was when I had my OHS#2

:)

Best Wishes
 
Hi and welcome

just a quick tip, type the @ symbol then follow with the next letters of the username, this creates an "at mention". Eg when typing
@Superman
I got this:
View attachment 889862
and selected Superman

@dick0236 also needs a mention ;-)

Best of luck with the surgery.



welcome to any time ... shoot me a message ("conversation") any time and I'm happy to chew the fat.
you're a year older than I was when I had my OHS#2

:)

Best Wishes
Well thank ya much @pellicle ! I'll have to remember that as I mosey around here and comment!
 
I'll have to remember that as I mosey around here and comment!
specific atMentions aren't really needed if you select a section of text and tap the reply

but they offer the opportunity for people to get notifications (including emails) when such events are triggered
(not this kind of triggered
triggered.gif

)
Best Wishes
 
Hi Buckwheat! This Forum has a lot to offer younger men and women who need OHS (Open Heart Surgery). Hopefully, it will take much of the mystery away. I have been on the Forum for 17 years and I can honestly say that I have learned more in those years than in the 40 years before I joined the Forum. If you are like most of us you won't "miss a beat" (pun intended) in living a near-normal life after your surgery.
 
Great to have you (you know what I mean :)), and as others have mentioned, this is the place to do lots of learning and get support.

I was your age when my work was done, 17 years ago now, and there are a range of other young adult patients on here as well, should you ever need to message about that.
 
Hello Buckwheat, Welcome to this forum / group, as you have said there is a lot of valuable information from many members.

in my case once i had my valve replaced and finished my cardiac rehab i was amazed on how much more energy and active i could be compared to before (aortic stenosis, my valve was as hard a a rock)
 

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