16 Days Out And Getting Scared...

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Foxtail118

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Jun 20, 2020
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Foxtail - You'll be fine. Sense of humor really helps. And remember, given your size - the beds have extenders (not sure that extend THAT much) but the footboards do extend!

Superman:


Even with the softeners, etc, I think "being backed up" is a thing. And not just b/c of the pain meds, but something called ileus, which occurs when the bowels have trouble waking up after surgery. Let's just say my night 3 was a night I will not soon forget. I was out of bed every 5 minutes, on my own, and I really thanked the nurse who didn't pass judgement at 2 a.m. when, let's just say, the floor of the room, or my bed, was really not a pretty sight. To make sure my bowels weren't blocked they added my abdomen to the post-op CT scan. Turns out my bowels were not blocked and a special diet for a day or two cured what was ailing them. But they found an infection in my prostate - possibly the result of the catheter. They (in Cleveland) had not seen this type of complication before. It led to some hand-wringing, a bunch of consulting with a bunch of different doctors, and a near-brush with prostate surgery. But my incredible surgeon's cooler (and smarter) head prevailed and I went on six weeks of Cirpo and an intravenous antibiotic (via a Pic line) as a precaution to spare any infection getting to the new valve. The infection went away. In the end, it was all really just an annoying distraction.

Paleo woman - that's great on the street clothes. Makes Total sense. I wonder if that's a UK thing. And this tip on the bed: Remember, they are (or in Cleveland were) filled with air. My biggest complaint, with the post-surgical back pain, was that the bed sagged. Finally, one nurse added air to the part of the mattress that sagged. Solved the problem. Foxtail - don't hesitate being a squeaky wheel on that if you're in a hospital with a saggy air-filled bed. Also, for the ICU - bring some noise-cancelling earphones or earplugs and an eye mask to drown out the light.
Hi! I will try my best to avoid an infection. I don't have a prostate anymore... and don't usually have a problem with tight bowels. However, I will be on the "look out" for them thanks to your warning.
 

pellicle

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and I don't think they were able to screen my blood for it.
I think you misunderstood what I meant by screening. This is what I meant by screening.

HIV Transmission Through Transfusion --- Missouri and Colorado, 2008

HIV Transmission Through Transfusion --- Missouri and Colorado, 2008
Weekly
October 22, 2010 / 59(41);1335-1339

Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through transfusion of contaminated blood components was documented in the United States in 1982 (1). Since then, the risk for transfusion-transmitted HIV infection has been almost eliminated by the use of questionnaires to exclude donors at higher risk for HIV infection and the use of highly sensitive laboratory screening tests to identify infected blood donations. The risk for acquiring HIV infection through blood transfusion today is estimated conservatively to be one in 1.5 million, based on 2007--2008 data (2). This report describes the first U.S. case of transfusion-transmitted HIV infection reported to CDC since 2002 (3). A blood center in Missouri discovered that blood components from a donation in November 2008 tested positive for HIV infection.


So this is why probably nobody mentioned that idea to the OP ... because of screening.
* Note this is a CDC publication, so not approved or supported by Donald Dump
 

Protimenow

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No, I didn't misunderstand - I was referring to testing of the blood for COVID-19 (and, perhaps, antibodies) to make sure that the blood transfused didn't have the virus. I think we were on the same page.
 
Joined
Jan 15, 2020
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Hi All,

My first post was titled "16 Days Out And Getting Scared". Now it is 3 days out and I am scared...haha, just kidding. All of you have made me feel a lot better about the surgery.
You're gonna do great! And if nothing else, I was so fascinated by the whole process (I'd never had so much as a broken bone before) that I let my interest and learning about the body's healing process guide me. Every day was another step. I'm now five months out and that's STILL the case! And I'm more in tune with my body than every before in my life. Eager to hear your updates on the other side!
 

tom in MO

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Wanting a transfusion of your own blood is not related to HIV or to Corona virus. Some people (including doctors) just believe it's a good idea and many hospitals and insurance companies allow it. I had it done in 1995 for colon surgery as a precaution and never needed it. For my OHS, two hernias and a TURP, when I asked, I was told that these are essentially bloodless surgery and there was no need to put up a pint "just in case." They were right, blood was not needed for these surgeries.
 

Protimenow

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When I had my OHS in 1991, HIV WAS a fear. They didn't yet have a way to screen for it in human blood. Although I don't think that I actually needed it, it was there in case I did. I assume that if I didn't use it, it could have been donated to help others (and I think I signed a form, way back then, that allowed them to do it).

As far as COVID-19 is concerned, I don't know what's done to test for the virus in the blood. A pint - just in case - is still probably a good idea - and, if not needed, would be able to help someone who DOES need the blood.
 

ejc61

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Hi! I will try my best to avoid an infection. I don't have a prostate anymore... and don't usually have a problem with tight bowels. However, I will be on the "look out" for them thanks to your warning.
I had my mitral valve repair in 2009. It went pretty well and it was my first surgery ever. Your prostatectomy caught my attention. I've been under AS since 2017, but I know that can change at any time. From my MR surgery experience and what I hear about a prostatectomy, I'd say you'll be just fine.
 

Foxtail118

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Jun 20, 2020
Messages
29
Hi - 32 days after MVR and all is going well so far. No issues with the prior prostatectomy done last November. Good luck with AS for the prostate - wish younwell.

Mike
 
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