Tissue valve longevity: Can it last longer under certain lifestyle conditions?

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tjay

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Is there any data or information to suggest that tissue valve may last longer under certain lifestyle conditions?

For example, if someone lives a very clean (e.g. eating) and active lifestyle, can they expect it to last longer?
For sure, they are many many other variables, but wondering if lifestyle itself is also one of the variables.

Any thoughts or data to that regard is appreciated. I'm leaning on mechanical valve but wanted to revisit tissue one last time :) I strive to live simple, clean and active, and can even make any necessary lifestyle changes after the surgery if need be. I'm fairly disciplined and can do whatever it takes. But the question is if lifestyle even a significant factor in the longevity of a tissue valve? Any literature or insight is appreciated.
Thank you.
 
Forgot to add that I'm (almost) 55. If I can get a tissue valve last 20 years, then I may go that route (with the option of TAVR when I'm 75 let's say......).
 
a thorny and vexing question. The answer is "it depends"

Too many variables to predict, you could get 2 years or 20 year ... you'll average 10 before SVD and the reasons range from as simple as "its a piece of leather and so no two bits of hide wear the same" through to the complex

get your Lp(a) tested because that's a significant determinant
https://heart.bmj.com/content/110/4/299

here's the low down on SVD
https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.120.018506

you won't find a better reference than that (but its quite a bone to chew).

Some simplifications are found here
by Dr Schaff of the Mayo


more current video


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306127/
I think more than mech = warfarin etc. This is the main issue of the choice of valve replacement.

also well worth your time to listen:
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/838221

Its up to you, but 68 would not be my desired time for a reoperation ... oh, and if anyone says "TAVI" to you just search here how many times people were promised and then found "you're not suited".

Best Wishes
 
Is there any data or information to suggest that tissue valve may last longer under certain lifestyle conditions?

For example, if someone lives a very clean (e.g. eating) and active lifestyle, can they expect it to last longer?
For sure, they are many many other variables, but wondering if lifestyle itself is also one of the variables.

Any thoughts or data to that regard is appreciated. I'm leaning on mechanical valve but wanted to revisit tissue one last time :) I strive to live simple, clean and active, and can even make any necessary lifestyle changes after the surgery if need be. I'm fairly disciplined and can do whatever it takes. But the question is if lifestyle even a significant factor in the longevity of a tissue valve? Any literature or insight is appreciated.
Thank you.
Clean living will not keep your replacement tissue valve from deteriorating. Modern medicine has suppositions but no proof as to the cause of tissue valve degeneration other than it's the patient's individual internal biochemistry. Our society likes to think that a "healthy lifestyle" is a panacea, but it's not.
 
I had my first tissue aorta valve (🐖) replace in 10/11 and had many symptoms. I just had it replace again 2/24 (12 years and four months later) with another tissue valve (🐄). I had no symptoms and walk at the park in the morning and I had a cold for a month that I couldn't get over and that night I went to hospital. My heart had fluid around it because of keeping hydrated.
The last valve put in should be able to have two TAER done in the future. I am now 67.
 
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Clean living will not keep your replacement tissue valve from deteriorating.
total unequivocal agreement ... nor even a Vegan diet
Our society likes to think that a "healthy lifestyle" is a panacea, but it's not.
well I'm not sure such is the common view (of our society or even yours) but it sure helps avoid some common problems
  • Obesity (some think to normalise that as healthy, its not)
  • diabetes
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (smoking usually)
  • many other things are prevented or delayed by regular exersize and a good diet
A good starter for the interested
 
I am a competative powerlifter. I had my valve replaced with an Edwards bovine valve in 2005. I lift HEAVY 4x per week for the last 20 years. Last echo my EF was 70 with only minimal calcification. Take from it what you wish.
 
All, Thank you so much for great insights, as always. You're a great bunch :)

I'm leaning mechanical but doing diligence while I can :)

I had my initial surgeon consult yesterday and we got the surgery date set (July 22).

Will keep you all posted, and I'll have many more questions yet. Just a heads-up :)
 
Is there any data or information to suggest that tissue valve may last longer under certain lifestyle conditions?

For example, if someone lives a very clean (e.g. eating) and active lifestyle, can they expect it to last longer?
For sure, they are many many other variables, but wondering if lifestyle itself is also one of the variables.

Any thoughts or data to that regard is appreciated. I'm leaning on mechanical valve but wanted to revisit tissue one last time :) I strive to live simple, clean and active, and can even make any necessary lifestyle changes after the surgery if need be. I'm fairly disciplined and can do whatever it takes. But the question is if lifestyle even a significant factor in the longevity of a tissue valve? Any literature or insight is appreciated.
Thank you.
Hello tjay,

Edwards Resilia valve at 54 years old 6 years ago.

During that time, I worked long hours usually over 8 hours per day over the course of 3 years almost every day to completely rebuild a 1,600 sf cabin taken down to the bare studs by myself with no help from anyone (I wanted to see if I could still do it), and the valve is still going strong as of the last echo in 2023.

I walk a few miles a day now and am still doing smaller construction projects on various properties when needed.

I think it's an individual thing but I would not trade an absolutely normal life without restrictions, ticking, etc. with my biological valve for however many years I get with it and a possible TAVR later in exchange for "probably" not having to deal with a second surgery if I went with a mechanical valve.

It's an individual choice but I would strongly recommend going with what your doctor tells you is best for you over any advice you get from internet posters, myself included.
 
Hello tjay,

Edwards Resilia valve at 54 years old 6 years ago.

During that time, I worked long hours usually over 8 hours per day over the course of 3 years almost every day to completely rebuild a 1,600 sf cabin taken down to the bare studs by myself with no help from anyone (I wanted to see if I could still do it), and the valve is still going strong as of the last echo in 2023.

I walk a few miles a day now and am still doing smaller construction projects on various properties when needed.

I think it's an individual thing but I would not trade an absolutely normal life without restrictions, ticking, etc. with my biological valve for however many years I get with it and a possible TAVR later in exchange for "probably" not having to deal with a second surgery if I went with a mechanical valve.

It's an individual choice but I would strongly recommend going with what your doctor tells you is best for you over any advice you get from internet posters, myself included.
hi Daniel,
I appreciate your insights. It does provide balance in perspective and experience. I'm happy to see that you're happy with your choice :)
May you forever keep your tissue valve.
Thank you.
 
I am a competative powerlifter. I had my valve replaced with an Edwards bovine valve in 2005. I lift HEAVY 4x per week for the last 20 years. Last echo my EF was 70 with only minimal calcification. Take from it what you wish.
I'm guessing you have a strong, slow heart rate, which can help tissue valves last longer.
 
Forgot to add that I'm (almost) 55. If I can get a tissue valve last 20 years, then I may go that route (with the option of TAVR when I'm 75 let's say......).
I wish you all the best and lots of great advice on this site. It has been a cornerstone of our family for 15 years since my father, also a member - JohnB - Oxford UK, had a Bovine Tissue AVR.

My father has had 15 great years from his valve, but tomorrow he is having it replaced. Fortunately he is facing a TAVR valve in valve.

Wishing you all the best.
 
I've been on Eliquis (5 mg 2 x day) and Metoprolol (100 mg 2 x day) since my Edwards Magna Ease aortic valve operation April 15, 2015 (about 9 years ago). Episodes of irregular heartbeat as indicated by my Omron home monitor maybe once every 4 months, but nothing that affects me like the afib I had immediately after the operation. My pulse is consistently in the mid to high 50 beats/minute. When I tell the cardiologist that I get tired more easily than my wife, he says "...get used to it, live with it". I think I will.
 
Forgot to add that I'm (almost) 55. If I can get a tissue valve last 20 years, then I may go that route (with the option of TAVR when I'm 75 let's say......).
I wish you all the best and lots of great advice on this site. It has been a cornerstone of our family for 15 years since my father, also a member - JohnB - Oxford UK, had a Bovine Tissue AVR.

My father has had 15 great years from his valve, but tomorrow he is having it replaced. Fortunately he is facing a TAVR valve in valve.
 

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