The best bleeding stoppers in emergency situations

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Jeff Lebowski

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Mar 23, 2024
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55
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İzmir/TURKEY
Since we use warfarin, bleeding may last a little longer in some minor accidents. What I want to talk about here are minor accidents. Such as small cuts that may occur in various parts of the body as a result of an accident. Such as hairline abrasions caused by a fall while cycling. For example, small wounds on the knee or hand as a result of a fall on a mountain hike. I am thinking of preparing a small first aid kit for such situations and putting it in my backpack when going to such activities.
What I want to ask you is what are the the most effective bleeding stopping medical supplies? Obviously, I put sterile sponges, elastic gauze bandage, medical cloth tape, Batticon in this bag for now. If you have a suggestion other than these, I would like to provide.
Best regards
 

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I carried some anti-biotic ointment and some band-aids in my fishing tackle box and golf-club bag.......but then, I was not riding mountain bikes or climbing. Normally, only first-aid-type stuff is good to have on hand......the serious stuff requiring stitches or a cast means a trip to the nearest ER.
 
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Since we use warfarin, bleeding may last a little longer in some minor accidents. What I want to talk about here are minor accidents. Such as small cuts that may occur in various parts of the body as a result of an accident. Such as hairline abrasions caused by a fall while cycling. For example, small wounds on the knee or hand as a result of a fall on a mountain hike. I am thinking of preparing a small first aid kit for such situations and putting it in my backpack when going to such activities.
What I want to ask you is what are the the most effective bleeding stopping medical supplies? Obviously, I put sterile sponges, elastic gauze bandage, medical cloth tape, Batticon in this bag for now. If you have a suggestion other than these, I would like to provide.
Best regards
But you have a sever bleed out, these will not stop a sever bleed, which is also you or someone has to put pressure on the bleed site till help arrives.
 
Dunno, but are you meaning Lp(a) test?
Maybe yes. Is that a good one to get information? My cardiologist said that if i wanted to check for blockages, I should do a chemical stress test because my pacemaker doesn’t allow for a regular one. My only complaint is shortness of breath going up inclines. I have a total heart block, a fibs I do not ever feel due to the heart block and my pacemaker. My atrium doesn’t conmunicate with my ventricle.
He said I’m very healthy, and the only medication I take is blood thinner. I feel good but walking up hill or inclines give me shortness of breath for years now, so nothing new.
Is it a good idea to get a stress test? It stresses me just thinking about it! Thanks
Sheena
 
When I travel abroad or to remote areas, I always have Amoxicillin antibiotic with me to protect against endocarditis.
I also have hemostatic gauze as in the link.
Wound care physicians face unique challenges when treating bleeding wounds. Many patients treated are using common anti-coagulant drugs making fast, stable clotting more difficult and time consuming. Many common wounds like necrotic and chronic wounds requiring particularly aggressive post sharp debridement require a fast acting hemostat like OMNI-STAT®.

OMNI-STAT® is a topical temporary external hemostat that helps rapidly and safely stop bleeding. It is effective for patients using common anti-coagulant drugs (Millner, 2010, Koksal, 2011 & Data on file). Rapid hemostasis may allow for shorter patient length of stay and better management of valuable staff resources and also helping to reduce blood loss and any associated risks.
https://www.omni-stat.com/hemostatic-gauze/
 
When I travel abroad or to remote areas, I always have Amoxicillin antibiotic with me to protect against endocarditis.
I also have hemostatic gauze as in the link.
Wound care physicians face unique challenges when treating bleeding wounds. Many patients treated are using common anti-coagulant drugs making fast, stable clotting more difficult and time consuming. Many common wounds like necrotic and chronic wounds requiring particularly aggressive post sharp debridement require a fast acting hemostat like OMNI-STAT®.

OMNI-STAT® is a topical temporary external hemostat that helps rapidly and safely stop bleeding. It is effective for patients using common anti-coagulant drugs (Millner, 2010, Koksal, 2011 & Data on file). Rapid hemostasis may allow for shorter patient length of stay and better management of valuable staff resources and also helping to reduce blood loss and any associated risks.
https://www.omni-stat.com/hemostatic-gauze/
Neighbour, under what conditions and in what dosage do you use Amoxicillin antibiotic?

When I asked a cardiovascular surgeon in Turkey about my concern about endocarditis and what I should do to avoid getting it, he told me that there is nothing you can do about it.
 
Consider the next simple example, the infection in a dental office can be caused by a simple tool that has not been sterilized. So if you injure yourself and the wound is subcutaneous, you cannot know what will happen.
My advice is to ask a pathologist or a hematologist doctor about the dosage and when you should take an antibiotic.
https://www.escardio.org/Journals/E-Journal-of-Cardiology-Practice/Volume-16/vol16no33
I understand, but if I feel the symptoms of endocarditis, I will definitely go to a hospital. Since I have already had heart valve surgery and chose the mechanical valve, I do not plan to be in areas very far from hospitals, so I guess I do not need to keep the antibiotic you mentioned with me. I quit being a ocean going ship captain for reasons such as the fact that I was already using coumadin and constantly monitoring inr.
 
I understand, but if I feel the symptoms of endocarditis, I will definitely go to a hospital. Since I have already had heart valve surgery and chose the mechanical valve, I do not plan to be in areas very far from hospitals, so I guess I do not need to keep the antibiotic you mentioned with me. I quit being a ocean going ship captain for reasons such as the fact that I was already using coumadin and constantly monitoring inr.
In Europe, to buy an antibiotic, it must be prescribed by a doctor, it is forbidden to sell it.
For example, you have gone on a trip, you are in a mountain
and you are injured either with a knife or you fall and cause a big injury. If you have antibiotics and take 2 grams you will not suffer because you do not use antibiotics often so that the microbes in your body become resistant.
When you're in town you'll go to the doctor and he'll tell you what to do, but here we're talking about an emergency
To put it simply, have an anti-biotic with you and if you have an accident, send a photo of the injured person to your doctor and he will advise you.
 
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Are the ingredients of such powdered haemostatic agents suitable for us? I am asking because we are taking warfarin and also because we are at risk of endocarditis.
 
and also because we are at risk of endocarditis
Endo risk is mostly through filthy wound sites that are close to the heart; nasal and oral mucosa.

Afaik the extremities is an unusual entry.

PS
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK557641/#:~:text=The vast majority of infectious,cases in the developed world.

The vast majority of infectious endocarditis cases stem from gram-positive streptococci, staphylococci, and enterococci infection. Together, these three groups account for 80% to 90% of all cases, with Staphylococcus aureus specifically responsible for around 30% of cases in the developed world.[1] In addition to various streptococci species, other common colonizers of the oropharynx, such as the HACEK organisms (Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella) can less frequently be the culprit bacteria. Numerous other bacteria have been previously identified as well but comprise only about 6% of total cases. Finally, fungal endocarditis represents only about 1% of cases but can be a typically fatal complication of systemic Candida and Aspergillus infection in the immunocompromised population.

A quick word on William Osler (the physician mentioned in citation [1]):

Sir William Osler—fearsomely learned, immaculately dressed, perhaps the most famous physician of his day—was not a man given to public confessions of inadequacy. In his 1885 Gulstonian Lecture he gave a bravura performance, drawing on two decades of experimental research to construct a new framework for understanding different forms of endocarditis. In his conclusion, however, he emphasised “the outlines of our ignorance” in understanding this protean disease. As Osler knew all too well, few diseases have been transformed so drastically by shifts in medical theory and practice, and few have proved so endlessly resistant to stable classification.​
 
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