Marijuana and Blood Thinners/Mechanical Valve

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It's wise to approach such matters with caution. When it comes to using marijuana while on blood thinners or any medication, it's essential to prioritize your health and well-being. While some individuals may use marijuana without apparent issues, it's crucial to recognize that everyone's body reacts differently, and interactions with medications can vary.
 
If you're considering exploring marijuana use further, it's highly advisable to have an open and honest conversation with your healthcare provider or cardiologist. They can provide you with personalized guidance based on your specific medical history and the type of blood thinners you're taking. They may be able to offer insights into potential risks or precautions you should take.
 
If you're considering exploring marijuana use further, it's highly advisable to have an open and honest conversation with your healthcare provider or cardiologist. They can provide you with personalized guidance based on your specific medical history and the type of blood thinners you're taking. They may be able to offer insights into potential risks or precautions you should take.
And your chart will reflect you as a pot smoker for the rest of your life...
 
The whole marijuana and blood thinners topic can be a bit of a gray area, right? Considering individual factors is crucial, and chatting with your cardio about it is a smart move.
 
The whole marijuana and blood thinners topic can be a bit of a gray area, right? Considering individual factors is crucial, and chatting with your cardio about it is a smart move.
I've heard stories from folks who use both, but it's crucial to remember that everyone's body reacts differently. What might work for one person might not be the same for another. And yeah, you're spot on about people having no issues with alcohol, but marijuana can be a bit trickier.
If you're still digging for more info, check out this source at Does health insurance cover medical cannabis in the UK?. They've got loads of insights on medical cannabis, and you might find some useful info there. Plus, it's always good to have some reliable sources when you're navigating these kinds of questions.
 
If you're considering exploring marijuana use further, it's highly advisable to have an open and honest conversation with your healthcare provider or cardiologist. They can provide you with personalized guidance based on your specific medical history and the type of blood thinners you're taking. They may be able to offer insights into potential risks or precautions you should take.

Additionally, there's a head shop online I found recently, and they seem to have a diverse range of products that cater to various preferences. From smoking accessories to unique items, it could be an exciting place to explore. Always remember to prioritize safety, stay informed about the potential interactions with your medication, and consult your healthcare provider for any medical concerns or questions you may have.
 
I had no need thus far for these products, but if you want to try, just cross the northern border and voila, anywhere in Canada, on any street/town you will find at least 3 stores that sale those products, Gov making lots of tax $ on their business as they control who and what and where; So, just ask your cardiologist if there is a problem when you visit Canada and use those things, is 100% legal as long as you dont cross the border back home carrying them, nobody cares who buys it , some age restrictions apply but they wont concern anybody here.
 
Doctors don't always (often?) know a hell of a lot about this stuff - unless they have knowledge of other patients' experiences or read something in a journal about the subject and retained it. I'm not saying that they're a bad source of advice. And I'm certainly not saying to trust the Internet for good answers. Many doctors are almost clueless about INR - if they prescribe anticoagulants at all, they're prescribing Eliquis or Pradaxa - medications that they don't have to be especially carefully about - a minority of their patients take warfarin - and, aside from probably knowing the correct range for patients, I'm not sure that they're all that good a source of advice.

OTOH - I wouldn't try something (like marijuana) without doing what you've done - asked about other user experience here (just anecdotal, of course). If you DO try it (or anything new) be sure to check your INR for effects.
 
That's why I said 'often.' It precludes the word 'never.'

My electrocardiologist at least trusts me to know what I'm doing. He makes everyone else on warfarin who he does any procedures on bridge - he knows that I won't and respects this. I'm able to bring my INR back a few days after a procedure is done.
 
That's why I said 'often.' It precludes the word 'never.'
but its why I added more to suggest that its like nearly 'never' ... non zero but its my view that you'd need to sample a thousand general practitioners to find one or two who are adroit at it.

From a scientific viewpoint that's as near none as is practicable.
 

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