Weightlifting!

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boricuaff

New member
Joined
Nov 2, 2013
Messages
2
Location
Virginia, USA
Hello,
I was wondering if there is anyone on here that has had good response from a weightlifting routine. I've had my Aortic Valve now for almost 6 years ( December will be 6 yrs)and it seems like I workout in fear. When that side kicks in I resist lifting and therefore no results. I'm not overweight and I've been back to work for years now. I just want to be back in the shape that I was before this happened.
Any ideas? or am I just panicking?
I have no issues with my job (firefighter) but I just want to put on a little more muscle. Help!!
 

AZ Don

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 23, 2013
Messages
675
Location
Phoenix, AZ
Well if you had an aneurysm or some risk factor for aneurysm (such as bicuspid aortic valve), then there are some that may advise some limitations as my Dr's did. Some advise no restrictions: http://www.valvereplacement.org/forums/showthread.php?41721-Exercise-Post-Aneurysm-Repair&highlight=

In any case, some are this site are exercising quite strenuously. Competitive power lifter who shared his routine during and after recovery: http://www.valvereplacement.org/forums/showthread.php?40352-More-gym-goodness-8-week-update&highlight=gymguy
More than 1,000 push-ups in a week: http://www.valvereplacement.org/forums/showthread.php?41414-Pushups-routine&highlight=gymguy

For myself, at least for now, I am limiting myself to a weight that I can lift at least 25 times because of my risk for another aneurysm. I don't expect to gain muscle but at least I don't seem to be losing it.
 

boricuaff

New member
Joined
Nov 2, 2013
Messages
2
Location
Virginia, USA
Thank you for the info AZ Don. I had an Aortic Dissection in 2007 with a St. Jude mechanical s/s valve. I have a false lumen (double barrel aorta) with some leakage but as per my cardio, that is common with those on anticoagulant therapy. My cardio gave me the go ahead to lift and run with the understanding that I had to be careful. I sure would like to get back to where I was before 2007. It seems to get harder and harder. I feel going to work and doing what I love to do is more important that lifting now even though I still work out and lift, it's not to the extent that I used to do.
 

knotguilty

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Joined
Jul 29, 2013
Messages
200
Location
Salem County, NJ
I will tell you that from what I have read and been told, you should not lift anything too heavy where you have to hold your breath. It causes a lot of pressure on your heart. I was concerned about the same thing and my primary told me that I would be surprised at what I would be able to do, and he was right. It is very important to breath while lifting heavy. I can tell you I do a little more aerobic exercise than I do weights, where before my surgery it was the opposite. I currently weigh around 180 and the heaviest I go at this point is benching 190lbs. I did 350 on the leg press today. Before surgery I was benching up to 250-275lbs. But now I run 4 miles on a tread mill twice a week and I try to get on a stationary bike for another 10 miles every week. I do split routines and feel like a million bucks. So I would suggest work your way up and you will be surprised at what you can do too. It does not happen over night.
 

TheGymGuy

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
975
Location
Rockville, MD
Hey Boricuaff,
GymGuy here.

Ditto on what Ski Girl said!!!! Where is the damn "Like" button?

I and many other folks are very consistent in sharing this message: Do what feels right and push yourself 10% past that. With consistency comes the progress. I am not a doctor, and take my advice just like that of anyone else on this board, an advice from non-professional, however, unless specifically indicated by a doctor you have no restrictions at this point. Look, I am in my mid-30s now and still train hard. Wait, scratch that, harder than before the surgery. I assure you that every day that I train is a battle. It's not due to surgery is that training is hard, you have to push yourself every time, and the results will come.

I train for 60-90 minutes 5 days a week, and feel stronger and healthier now than ever before, and this is only 19 months after surgery. I recently competed in a powerlifting competition and squatted and deadlifted more than ever before. Come on mate, go to gym, put some effort in, try harder/more every workout and watch progress come.

Best Wishes,
GymGuy
 

Paleowoman

VR.org Supporter
Joined
Jun 14, 2010
Messages
2,579
Location
Surrey, UK
I was doing very strenuous, high intensity, weightlifting until five weeks ago as I am soon to have surgery BUT a doc on a weight lfiting forum I'm on reminded me that Arnold Schwarzenegger had a bicuspid aortic valve which was replaced, and he returned to weightlifting after the replacement :)
 

AmyR

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Messages
173
Location
India
Hello. I am 24yrs now and love to lift. I am 5 months post of and back to the gym. I dont do any bench presses yet fearing the sternum and not my heart. :p i go my arms and shoulders and do good number of inclined push ups. The fear is common. I startd of with a fear of walking fast and i have come this long to the routine i presently follow. I still am not 100% over the fear but still try taking it slowly slowly. Try it slowly you will be surprised how quick you will gain back your form. I hope to have a really good body. and trust me you need some inspiration, read thegymguy's forums. They really gave me the boost to get back with a bang. :) All the Best. :)
 

clay_from_nj

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 23, 2012
Messages
397
Location
Fort Lupton, Colorado, USA
I wholeheartedly agree with skigirl - Go for it!

and, Don, I do expect to gain muscle,

and, knotguilty, you shouldn't ever be holding your breath while lifting, no matter how much weight, so lift all you can and admire the results!
 
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