Weight lifting with valve and aneurysm replacement

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Froller2

Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2022
Messages
7
So I guess a little update is in its place.
I first and foremost am very thankful for all the input and comments you lads and ladies has come with, even though it varies alot
its reassuring to know, I'm not alone with this (even though it feels like it at times ). now I'd like to say that I got a proper talk with the cardiologist.
but alas I have to wait til September.. so for training i did get a thing, I have to follow called the Borg scale, which is neat. Though it is limiting, i currently have removed vig compound lift such as squats and deadlifts til further notice in September. I also have been following the Borg guideline thingy and doing overload progression with 15-20 reps and only adding weight when I can do 20. , And breathing normallyish. It's hard to I've grown to enjoy it. Now for inr i have finished AND am now doing to myself 😊
I'm sorry for the long time between this reply but I've had alot happening as of late (also starting work again the 13th) again thanks everyone for your replies and lovely messages. Froller
Also @TheGymGuy IL check your post later as it caught my interest
 

Aqua_Grim7

Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2022
Messages
8
So I guess a little update is in its place.
I first and foremost am very thankful for all the input and comments you lads and ladies has come with, even though it varies alot
its reassuring to know, I'm not alone with this (even though it feels like it at times ). now I'd like to say that I got a proper talk with the cardiologist.
but alas I have to wait til September.. so for training i did get a thing, I have to follow called the Borg scale, which is neat. Though it is limiting, i currently have removed vig compound lift such as squats and deadlifts til further notice in September. I also have been following the Borg guideline thingy and doing overload progression with 15-20 reps and only adding weight when I can do 20. , And breathing normallyish. It's hard to I've grown to enjoy it. Now for inr i have finished AND am now doing to myself 😊
I'm sorry for the long time between this reply but I've had alot happening as of late (also starting work again the 13th) again thanks everyone for your replies and lovely messages. Froller
Also @TheGymGuy IL check your post later as it caught my interest
Glad you’ve endeavored to keep up with the training - I’ve recently decided to starting lifting again after my aneurysm fix and whilst the light weights aren’t ideal, I’ve realized after a bit of research over the last few weeks you can still build muscle by lifting light. Your situation seems almost identical to mine, so it’s nice to read that I’m not the only one - great to see others on this thread continuing to lift post surgery too!

My doc told me that it’s the sudden rise in BP that’s the problem, as this can put undue stress on the grafts we’ve got. I’m doing the same as you: 15-20 rep sets, breathing fluently while lifting and definitely no valsalva. Hope your training goes well bud 👍
 

BCAVR

Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2022
Messages
14
Location
Usa
I had a mechanical valve replacement without any other issues (no aneurysm etc) so I don’t know how transferable my experience is. I’ve made a conscious effort to limit max weight lifts and for the most part train at 12 reps and then pyramid down to 4 or so. I’m still hitting 405 squats and 275 bench etc. but I do so rarely and try to limit any valsalva / intense effort.

That said, I’m confident you can build significant mass over time with a 12 rep scheme, but you need to nail your diet and training consistency. Id think of those as the variables you can tweak hard since your weight progression will be more muted than it may otherwise be. You won’t be a real mass monster without juicing or great genetics anyway, but you can definitely have a good lifter aesthetic, and that’s more conventionally attractive anyway (although I too yearn for 21” arms 🥲).

As an aside, I have a hard time understanding how it’s different to hit a set of 12 where the 12th rep is near failure vs hitting 6 where the 6th is near failure. You’re near max effort in either case aren’t you?

FWIW We’ve done stress tests and no issues after HR as high as 160. If anything I’m worried about the thrombogenesis issue w the valve post exercise after my time on this forum and this seems more related to any exercise induced HR increase not specific to lifting.
 

Aqua_Grim7

Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2022
Messages
8
I had a mechanical valve replacement without any other issues (no aneurysm etc) so I don’t know how transferable my experience is. I’ve made a conscious effort to limit max weight lifts and for the most part train at 12 reps and then pyramid down to 4 or so. I’m still hitting 405 squats and 275 bench etc. but I do so rarely and try to limit any valsalva / intense effort.

That said, I’m confident you can build significant mass over time with a 12 rep scheme, but you need to nail your diet and training consistency. Id think of those as the variables you can tweak hard since your weight progression will be more muted than it may otherwise be. You won’t be a real mass monster without juicing or great genetics anyway, but you can definitely have a good lifter aesthetic, and that’s more conventionally attractive anyway (although I too yearn for 21” arms 🥲).

As an aside, I have a hard time understanding how it’s different to hit a set of 12 where the 12th rep is near failure vs hitting 6 where the 6th is near failure. You’re near max effort in either case aren’t you?

FWIW We’ve done stress tests and no issues after HR as high as 160. If anything I’m worried about the thrombogenesis issue w the valve post exercise after my time on this forum and this seems more related to any exercise induced HR increase not specific to lifting.
I’m no doctor, but I *think* the difference is down to the way the failure point is reached rather than the actual failure itself.

Going for a 1RP will cause a sudden, huge rise in BP, or going from 0-100, so to speak.

Reaching failure on your 20th rep means that you’ve had a much more gradual, slower increase in BP. Also I think you’re reaching failure because of metabolic stress and your muscles fatiguing due to the higher repetitions rather than than because you’re trying lift an extremely heavy weight and straining excessively to lift it.
 
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