Stool Softeners and valve replacement

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Protimenow

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I realize that this sounds like a really wierd topic - bu stay with me here.

I retunned from the hospital a day or two ago, after being treated for some wild and crazy arrhythmias (more about this in another thread).

Before I was discharged, one of the doctors put me on stool softeners. He made an interesting connection between stool softeners and prosthetic valves: 'pushing' to go put a lot of stress on the hears. Not having to push puts much less stress on the heart.

In other threads, it was said that, while we can live normal lives after OHS, we shouldn't press rates. I guess that pushing over the toilet is another form of 'weight lifting' that we should think about avoiding.
 

pellicle

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strangely more than you'd think this is a hot topic

myself I always recommend KimChi, I mean why have something that doesn't give you some nutrition as well?
Personally I prefer KimChi. Drop into your local Korean shop before getting to hospital so you can stash some in your fridge. I find just a small side serve provides a much more gentle to the bowel movement encouragement than anything I've yet been tested on in Hospitals



The Koreans know that eating it helps with movement. As with everything, too much of a good thing is not good ... this was a toilet door in a roadside "diner" on the way to Pusan



a 500g tub does me in hospital. I start with about 1/3 of it with my first meal out of intensive care and then a side helping with every lunch. As regular as


don't knock it till you've tried it ;-)
Not having to push puts much less stress on the heart.
the guys a tool
 

tom in MO

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perhaps the primary difference is that normally kimchi doesn't contain E Coli as the active ingredient ...
Depends upon the quality of the kimchi. There is some really bad kimchi out there. A Korean I know recommended not to eat restaurant kimchi in America as a general rule. "Not fresh-best is home made." :) It's actually not too hard to make. Fermented cabbage and vegetables is a European and Eastern European delight just not as spicy.
 

pellicle

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A Korean I know recommended not to eat restaurant kimchi in America as a general rule. "Not fresh-best is home made." :)
If you know Koreans well you'll know that they're well represented in the TV Show Kims Convenience. {meaning that they always say things like that}

I know quite a many Koreans, met many in my time in Japan, sufficently that I studied Korean and went to do a semester at a Korean University (seriously considering teaching there when I completed my Masters) {instead I met and married a lovely woman from Finland there and that changed quite a few things ;-)

Its true there is some rubbish out there, but go to a Korean shop not the local Costco and you'll be fine ;-)
 

carolinemc

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May 31, 2010
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kansas city, mo
I realize that this sounds like a really wierd topic - bu stay with me here.

I retunned from the hospital a day or two ago, after being treated for some wild and crazy arrhythmias (more about this in another thread).

Before I was discharged, one of the doctors put me on stool softeners. He made an interesting connection between stool softeners and prosthetic valves: 'pushing' to go put a lot of stress on the hears. Not having to push puts much less stress on the heart.

In other threads, it was said that, while we can live normal lives after OHS, we shouldn't press rates. I guess that pushing over the toilet is another form of 'weight lifting' that we should think about avoiding.
When I left the hospital after my surgery, they had me take stool softener also. Glad you are doing better.
 

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