St Jude Valves

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Protimenow

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Aug 10, 2010
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2,765
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California
I've had mine for nearly 28 years. It's still ticking....

I don't think I've had any issues with it.

Of course, I have to take warfarin daily, but this really isn't that big a deal to manage. It's easier now than it was when I first got the valve. Back then, I had to have my blood tested at a lab. Now, with meters available, I test at home (and I manage my dosing - although you may be more comfortable at at clinic, especially because the first few months, it can be difficult to get a handle on the dosing for your specific body).

This forum has a LOT of members who can help answer your questions.
 

Warrick

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Dec 27, 2015
Messages
504
Location
New Zealand
My fathers St Jude is 35 years old and still cranking, with no problems which I consider fantastic advertising, they do exactly what it says on the tin.. last a lifetime.

mine is just a baby at 3 1/2 yrs

I was nearly the same age as you are at 38, my dad was 42 when he got his, so as much as its a s**t sandwich being in your 30s and having this you are being fitted with a device that is road tested thru and thru and is made from the hardest manufactured substance in the world pyrolitic carbon.
 
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maggiemay

Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2019
Messages
9
Location
UK
I have had my aortic mechanical St Jude valve for 26 years, with no problems at all. Of course one has to take warfarin daily, and the self testing system is very good, text it and refer to the hospital blood department for the dosage and next self testing date. Operation done at Leeds General Infirmary UK
 

trinitymcdermott

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Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Messages
27
Location
Seattle, WA, USA
My 13 year old son got his St Jude aortic mechanical valve about 2 years and 4 months ago. I asked about bioprosthetic so he would t need to be on warfarin - his surgeons was not comfortable with him not having a proven lifetime valve because of his age (bioprosthetic also rapidly calcify in pediatrics) and his annulus was adult size so shouldn’t need an upgrade later.
Some consider Onyx as they are supposed to
require a lower INR - it it’s still new technology and his surgeon was it comfortable with that at
the time, but I understand he has begun using it recently in some patients (I know the rep that sells it). I’m happy he has a tried and true device.
 

Keithl

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Joined
Apr 20, 2019
Messages
272
I went On-X partially because of lower INR requirement, even though I plan on targeting an INR of 2.5, but also because it is supposedly quieter and has something that prevents the scarring from interfering with the valve (sorry I forget the medical term). I saw my PCP yesterday and even with stethoscope she was impressed with how quiet the On-X was as she has heard plenty of loud valves. While the On-X is newer than the St. Jude it does have a proven track record. My surgeon at Cleveland clinic uses it as his default valve.
 

Protimenow

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Aug 10, 2010
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2,765
Location
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I don't know much about On-X, but before the FDA approved it, I'm sure that it went through a LOT of testing.

If mine was On-X instead of St. Jude, I'd still be more comfortable keeping my INR around 2.5 than in the sub-2 that On-X says is safe. In this case, with 2.5 also being at the bottom of the range for St. Jude valves, the INR management may be similar - so perhaps the big difference would be that the On-X is quieter than the St. Jude.

We'll probably know better about any failure rates with On-X a decade or so from now. (I'm not sure that I'll be here that long, but, if not, my exit most likely will be unrelated to the St. Jude valve (aside, I guess, from really stupid INR management).
 

carolinemc

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Joined
May 31, 2010
Messages
717
Location
kansas city, mo
I don't know much about On-X, but before the FDA approved it, I'm sure that it went through a LOT of testing.

If mine was On-X instead of St. Jude, I'd still be more comfortable keeping my INR around 2.5 than in the sub-2 that On-X says is safe. In this case, with 2.5 also being at the bottom of the range for St. Jude valves, the INR management may be similar - so perhaps the big difference would be that the On-X is quieter than the St. Jude.

We'll probably know better about any failure rates with On-X a decade or so from now. (I'm not sure that I'll be here that long, but, if not, my exit most likely will be unrelated to the St. Jude valve (aside, I guess, from really stupid INR management).
With the On-x you do not have to test as often as on the S. Jude's valves with warafarin. I looked it up some years ago when On-x was starting to be used. It has come a long way for those who can get it.
 

Keithl

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Joined
Apr 20, 2019
Messages
272
With the On-x you do not have to test as often as on the S. Jude's valves with warafarin. I looked it up some years ago when On-x was starting to be used. It has come a long way for those who can get it.
I don’t care what they say I will still test at least once a week, and for now been testing twice a week as I am just 10 weeks post op.
 
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