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Schwarzenegger had another OHS

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MdaPA

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Jul 8, 2020
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given that homografts existed back then too (I had mine in 1992), I find it hard to see how they consciened it in that evidence, except in the furtherance of their "research".
I recall when my wife went for the ROSS procedure in 1997, the concensus/data then was that there was more likelyhood that her PV in the aortic position would last longer (20+ years) than a homograft would. Glad you got 20 years out of your homograft.

Do your research on Homograft ... similar benefits list
The Reality of Reoperation
A common misconception is that the Ross Procedure takes a one-valve disease and turns it into a two-valve disease and can result in early reoperation of the autograft (the new aortic valve) or the homograft (the human donor valve in the pulmonary position). However, the data paints a different picture.
Fifteen (15) years after surgery, almost 9 out of 10 patients continue to live without requiring a second intervention of either the pulmonary autograft or the homograft.1-3,14,16-19
Which Line do You Want to be on When it Comes to the Reality of Reoperation? Figure C - Comparison of Long-Term Outcomes among the Ross Procedure, Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement, and Bioprosthesis for Young Adults13
1603716270970.png


The Ross Procedure - The Ross Procedure
 

pellicle

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...Glad you got 20 years out of your homograft.
me too ... I didn't research it ... as at that stage research was less simple than now. Instead I'd had the same surgeon who had operated on me when I was 12 and whom had known me from when I was maybe 8.

When I had my last operation to replace it was driven by the aneurysm, without that I may well have had another few years (although it was reported as significantly calcified on excision).

A study from the hospital that did my procedure
Entrez PubMed
J Heart Valve Dis. 2001 May;10(3):334-44; discussion 335.

The homograft aortic valve: a 29-year, 99.3% follow up of 1,022 valve replacements.

O'Brien MF, Harrocks S, Stafford EG, Gardner MA, Pohlner PG, Tesar PJ, Stephens F.

The Prince Charles Hospital and the St Andrew's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The study aim was to elucidate the
advantages and limitations of the homograft aortic valve for aortic valve
replacement over a 29-year period.

RESULTS:
For all cryopreserved valves, at 15 years, the freedom was
* 47% (0-20-year-old patients at operation),
* 85% (21-40 years),
* 81% (41-60 years) and
* 94% (> 60 years).

So as it happened I was part of the 21-40 group
I understand that this is an emotionally laden topic, so lets just leave it at I've expressed my opinions with justifications and effects and you yours.

Lastly the past is the past, and I write this not for us, but for those who are in the present looking to an operation in the future; not to compare us.

Indeed I am only here to discuss ANYTHING with respect to the future, be that assisting someone with a better AC Therapy outcome or inform their choices. I have been both lucky and unlucky (and will be both into the future). What I have been is irrelevant to the future IMO.
I wish you peace.
 
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Jmprosser.lab

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I don’t agree with everyone about the minimally invasive stuff. Again, I know someone who got that procedure done successfully—she was a 41 years old when she got it and it’s been about a year. By no means am I saying it’s the primary way for surgery yet, but all of us in this chat forum can’t just disregard Lars Svensson from the Cleveland Clinic—he’s one of the best heart surgeons on the planet. Hope isn’t always naïveté. I know that minimally invasive is absolute best case scenario and the odds are I’ll get the full open chest. However, the progress is absolutely encouraging to everyone who observes the industry. Below please see Svenssons response to a question about recovery during a Q&A—the entire transcript is avail on their site. This was in 2018.

Question: what is the recovery for Aortic Valve replacement with replacement of ascending aorta like? What can I expect for length of time to recover, be able to travel home, return to work, etc.?

Lars Svensson: This depends where your operation is done. At Cleveland Clinic, we do most of those operations as minimally invasive, J incision, keyhole operation, and patients can start driving 2-3 weeks after surgery. It takes six weeks to fully recover. When the hole chest is opened, recovery typically takes more than six weeks. Most patients after minimally invasive operations are discharged 5-8 days after surgery, depending on whether they have afib after surgery. We don’t recommend return to vigorous exercise for the first eight weeks after surgery.
 

Jmprosser.lab

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here is my view (having had 3 OHS)

  • The Ross brings little to the table that a cryopreserved homograft does not (with similar results depending on age
  • The Ross essentially destroys a perfectly placed natural valve (the pulmonary) and does with it what a homograft of the wrong valve would do, replace the diseased valve, which is the aortic (so why stuff up the perfectly functioning one
  • The pulmonary must be then replaced, usually with a bioprosthetic (which will then be set to certain failure in the future
As a strong and active man he should have had a mechanical. He'd still be on that and his native pulmonary valve would still be fine.
Very helpful breakdown. Thank you!!!
 

Warrick

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Thats a terrible thing to say Tom, no one deserves OHS. Im sure many of us have similarities in our life choices to Arnie, did we deserve it too?
 

carolinemc

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I was born :D

I just read several articles about Arnold's latest surgery and they all reveal a history of bicuspid aortic valve. Glad he seems to be doing well after this third OHS.
Yeah the first two were repairs and this time it was a replacement of the aortic valve. He still has nine lives. He is the original Terminator.
 

pellicle

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Poor Arnold’s really struggling in his senior years. 😁
I recall that the Gym Guy said that Arnold is still really present in major weight lifting comps and comes along to provide support and guidance and even helps promising rookies get attention. I think he's doing a great job.
 

Maineiacs

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I don’t agree with everyone about the minimally invasive stuff. Again, I know someone who got that procedure done successfully—she was a 41 years old when she got it and it’s been about a year. By no means am I saying it’s the primary way for surgery yet, but all of us in this chat forum can’t just disregard Lars Svensson from the Cleveland Clinic—he’s one of the best heart surgeons on the planet. Hope isn’t always naïveté. I know that minimally invasive is absolute best case scenario and the odds are I’ll get the full open chest. However, the progress is absolutely encouraging to everyone who observes the industry. Below please see Svenssons response to a question about recovery during a Q&A—the entire transcript is avail on their site. This was in 2018.

Question: what is the recovery for Aortic Valve replacement with replacement of ascending aorta like? What can I expect for length of time to recover, be able to travel home, return to work, etc.?

Lars Svensson: This depends where your operation is done. At Cleveland Clinic, we do most of those operations as minimally invasive, J incision, keyhole operation, and patients can start driving 2-3 weeks after surgery. It takes six weeks to fully recover. When the hole chest is opened, recovery typically takes more than six weeks. Most patients after minimally invasive operations are discharged 5-8 days after surgery, depending on whether they have afib after surgery. We don’t recommend return to vigorous exercise for the first eight weeks after surgery.
He truly is a pioneer in Aortic Valve Surgery. Starting out at Lahey Clinic, Burlington, MA and then onto Cleveland, my plan is to follow him there.
 

Protimenow

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I had a double whammy -- bi-leaflet valve and what UCLA Student Health thought was Rheumatic Fever.

I had the aortic valve replaced in 1991 - probably resolving the effects of both.

And Schwarzenneger is still very active. For a while he was 'Editor-In-Chief' of a men's fitness magazine. He was involved in some of the articles and, perhaps, some editorial, but I'm sure that the real Editor-In-Chief was someone much more qualified for the job.
 
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