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Revisiting Post of Home Monitoring

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Protimenow

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Messages
3,697
Location
California
I don't think this is so.
I wouldn't be surprised if Roche didn't check the Vantus meters that were returned, clean them, send them back out, or just destroy them. But, of course, Roche got out of the monitoring business.

The meters on eBay seem to be from a few different sources:

Distributors - or associated companies - that sell the meters for less than the distributors have to charge at retail. Selling this way can also help avoid the requirement for a prescription.

Businesses that buy surplus or from other sources - hospitals, clinics, and other 'businesses' dispose of the meters - through sale or trade (I know of one dealer who traded some supplies to a clinic in exchange for 10 meters). The issue with hospitals and other businesses is that once the meters are depreciated, they buy new meters and dispose of the old ones.

The children or grandchildren - this is a minor source of meters. There are some who are on Medicare, they got the meter, paid for through their Medicare account, and either no longer needed it or died. The heirs had no use for this thing - maybe didn't know what it was worth - maybe wanted to help someone who needed it by making it affordable - and listed it on eBay.

Let me make clear that in most cases these meters - from whatever source - will be accurate and usable. The meters are made for continuous accurate usage. They can be used in clinics running hundreds of tests each week, or end users who would take years to run 100 tests. In all cases, the results must be accurate.

Strips for CoaguChek XS come with a chip that is inserted into the meter to set the meter so that it can run a test using settings that match variables on the strip. Further, each strip does quality control at the start of each test.

Coag-Sense has a similar method - each set of strips has a code on the package that is scanned by the meter. There's also a code on each strip that is used to enable the meter to give an accurate result.

The Coag-Sense PT2(the new model) has WiFi built in, and does occasional firmware updates (mine updated today).

The point is that the meters offered on eBay are usually accurate.

If you're looking to buy a meter, get one with a DOA warranty, or a seller that offers free returns.
 

LadyChicken

Active member
Joined
Apr 5, 2017
Messages
25
Location
Canada Ontario
I only do home monitoring and the occasional testing at the pharmacy down the street.
My doctor would have no real idea if I'm high or low. I assumed he was getting the results from the pharmacy until about a year and bit ago when my pharmacist told me they wrote my results down under my married name (not my health card name). Whoopsy!
In any event, I love it. My machine is my bestie (though it runs me $9 a stick) and the only reason life doesn't stress me out too much. I'm a worry-wart since the stroke and can't imagine being relaxed without the option to test whenever I get too in my head. I'm really hoping I mellow out when I hit my forties.
 

ATHENS1964

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 19, 2019
Messages
138
In Greece, roche only sells it through distributor stores, I can and do sell because I have a company that trades in dental and medical products. The retail price is around 580 euros and they leave us a small profit margin. In Greece it is not available from the health system and the insurance companies so someone will have to pay the full amount. The films cost about 65 euros per 24 pieces. Now I have started efforts with some cardiologists to pressure the Ministry of Health to prescribe the consumables. In general, the percentage of patients who use self-management is very small.
 

Soulfeelings

Active member
Joined
Jan 12, 2021
Messages
26
I would not be without my home tester...I control my testing n adjust as l see fit...my health is in my hands not someone elses 👍
 

Soulfeelings

Active member
Joined
Jan 12, 2021
Messages
26
I only do home monitoring and the occasional testing at the pharmacy down the street.
My doctor would have no real idea if I'm high or low. I assumed he was getting the results from the pharmacy until about a year and bit ago when my pharmacist told me they wrote my results down under my married name (not my health card name). Whoopsy!
In any event, I love it. My machine is my bestie (though it runs me $9 a stick) and the only reason life doesn't stress me out too much. I'm a worry-wart since the stroke and can't imagine being relaxed without the option to test whenever I get too in my head. I'm really hoping I mellow out when I hit my forties.
You do mellow after 40 but after 60 you just don't give a **** 😂
 

Protimenow

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Messages
3,697
Location
California
LadyChicken - if you can, test weekly, on the same day of the week.

This may make it easier than just 'thinking' about testing. Having a regular, weekly, schedule to test should help you to keep on schedule.

Also - if you aren't already doing it, keep track of your data - day, time, dose, INR. Many of us use a spreadsheet -- mine goes back to April 2009 -- this way, I know when I last tested, I keep track of dosage changes, I record any events that might have affected my INR, and it keeps me honest (about dosing, time between tests, etc.). I know that others also maintain similar (and sometimes more detailed) results.

You didn't say anything about your stroke. I had a stroke about 8 years ago because I trusted my meter. It said 2.6 - but in the hospital it was 1.7. My INR may have been below 2 for weeks or months.

After that incident, I tested many different meters, compared them to each other, and compared the results to labs. I didn't want to have another stroke, and wanted to find the meter that I had the most confidence in.

The XS is a good meter - strips are available and easy to find on eBay (and, of course, from distributors), and the results are usually close to lab results.

For many years, I preferred the Coag-Sense. Strips are also fairly easy to find. It's a bit more difficult to use than the XS. Results for me, for the past year or two, have usually been .5 or more less than the labs - a bit disconcerting, and lower than the XS when my INR on the XS gets above 3 or so.

This issue hasn't been reported by other users of the Coag-Sense. I'm not sure why my results with this meter are lower than the XS or the labs.

Above 3.0, the Coag-Sense seems to be closer to the lab results, and the XS results are higher than labs.

What's most important, LadyChicken is that you test weekly. If you don't manage your dosing, there are others here who can help you (especially Pellicle). Taking control of your testing and management are empowering -- and you may quickly learn that you probably know more than the people at the clinics.
 

Soulfeelings

Active member
Joined
Jan 12, 2021
Messages
26
LadyChicken - if you can, test weekly, on the same day of the week.

This may make it easier than just 'thinking' about testing. Having a regular, weekly, schedule to test should help you to keep on schedule.

Also - if you aren't already doing it, keep track of your data - day, time, dose, INR. Many of us use a spreadsheet -- mine goes back to April 2009 -- this way, I know when I last tested, I keep track of dosage changes, I record any events that might have affected my INR, and it keeps me honest (about dosing, time between tests, etc.). I know that others also maintain similar (and sometimes more detailed) results.

You didn't say anything about your stroke. I had a stroke about 8 years ago because I trusted my meter. It said 2.6 - but in the hospital it was 1.7. My INR may have been below 2 for weeks or months.

After that incident, I tested many different meters, compared them to each other, and compared the results to labs. I didn't want to have another stroke, and wanted to find the meter that I had the most confidence in.

The XS is a good meter - strips are available and easy to find on eBay (and, of course, from distributors), and the results are usually close to lab results.

For many years, I preferred the Coag-Sense. Strips are also fairly easy to find. It's a bit more difficult to use than the XS. Results for me, for the past year or two, have usually been .5 or more less than the labs - a bit disconcerting, and lower than the XS when my INR on the XS gets above 3 or so.

This issue hasn't been reported by other users of the Coag-Sense. I'm not sure why my results with this meter are lower than the XS or the labs.

Above 3.0, the Coag-Sense seems to be closer to the lab results, and the XS results are higher than labs.

What's most important, LadyChicken is that you test weekly. If you don't manage your dosing, there are others here who can help you (especially Pellicle). Taking control of your testing and management are empowering -- and you may quickly learn that you probably know more than the people at the clinics.
Never a truer statement...learn that you probably know more than the people at the clinics.
 

LadyChicken

Active member
Joined
Apr 5, 2017
Messages
25
Location
Canada Ontario
LadyChicken - if you can, test weekly, on the same day of the week.

This may make it easier than just 'thinking' about testing. Having a regular, weekly, schedule to test should help you to keep on schedule.

Also - if you aren't already doing it, keep track of your data - day, time, dose, INR. Many of us use a spreadsheet -- mine goes back to April 2009 -- this way, I know when I last tested, I keep track of dosage changes, I record any events that might have affected my INR, and it keeps me honest (about dosing, time between tests, etc.). I know that others also maintain similar (and sometimes more detailed) results.

You didn't say anything about your stroke. I had a stroke about 8 years ago because I trusted my meter. It said 2.6 - but in the hospital it was 1.7. My INR may have been below 2 for weeks or months.

After that incident, I tested many different meters, compared them to each other, and compared the results to labs. I didn't want to have another stroke, and wanted to find the meter that I had the most confidence in.

The XS is a good meter - strips are available and easy to find on eBay (and, of course, from distributors), and the results are usually close to lab results.

For many years, I preferred the Coag-Sense. Strips are also fairly easy to find. It's a bit more difficult to use than the XS. Results for me, for the past year or two, have usually been .5 or more less than the labs - a bit disconcerting, and lower than the XS when my INR on the XS gets above 3 or so.

This issue hasn't been reported by other users of the Coag-Sense. I'm not sure why my results with this meter are lower than the XS or the labs.

Above 3.0, the Coag-Sense seems to be closer to the lab results, and the XS results are higher than labs.

What's most important, LadyChicken is that you test weekly. If you don't manage your dosing, there are others here who can help you (especially Pellicle). Taking control of your testing and management are empowering -- and you may quickly learn that you probably know more than the people at the clinics.
This was a great response:) Very informative.

You are one of the very few people I've met who had a stroke after a valve replacement, and I gotta say, it's comforting --as weird as that sounds lol. I guess it's nice not feeling like I had some freakish bad luck, as my surgeon hinted at.
Mine happened before I tested on my own. Protocol in my area is to be testing every two weeks after a month of stable INR results, and then monthly. The stroke occurred a few days before I made it to the second week. The morning it happened, it was 2.1 based on the hospital lab results and, like you, I can't help but wonder how long it was 2.1, or possibly lower. Eek. Needless to say, I bought a Roche home monitor when I got out, and I've never been able to go more than 2 weeks without testing due to complete and total fear. The pharmacy near me also uses the same machine and has it tested regularly, so I hope I own a decent machine🤞
 

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