Remote INR taking over Coaguchek

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Al3x

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Jun 18, 2021
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I know it has been said before, but I am so glad I don't live under the American system of health care! Here in the UK my ambulance to hospital, tests, OHS for the valve replacement and then an operation for a pacemaker to be inserted were free. I bought my own INR meter directly from Roche (£299 / US$415 in 2014, still the same price if I needed one today), test weekly using strips provided on prescription (which would be £10 / US$13.90 per 24 strips if I had to pay, but like approx 90% of people my prescriptions are free). I provide a test result once every 2 months or so to my local anticoagulation clinic, but if I needed their help for something this can be done any time. No charge.

My elderly mother had a tissue valve inserted in 2009. Her hospital bed overlooked the Houses of Parliament, though apparently the food was not great. She had a small stroke a few years ago, and fell and broke her hip in the street about 2 years ago. She has lost her mobility, and has been provided with a hospital bed with full electrical adjustment, for free, including delivery and set up to use at home.

Yes, we pay higher tax, and our system is far from perfect, but on balance I think it is the better approach to health care. And no, I am not a socialist :)
I partially agree. We are extremely lucky in the UK to have the NHS and they do an amazing job with the funding they're given. However, the delays in getting appointments and treatment can be insane, and it's not unusual to get lost in the system (I was forgotten about for 10 years between the ages of 13 and 23). I'm fortunate to have insurance through work and the private system has been such a smooth, well-oiled machine in comparison. The quality of the actual care is identical though.

I'm pleased to hear you can get the CoaguChek strips on prescription. I've heard it can be a bit of a lottery about whether your local CQC will support home monitoring. I'm keeping my fingers crossed.
 

almost_hectic

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Jun 30, 2015
Messages
752
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naples, florida
Would just doing it yourself be cheaper?
Doing anything yourself would be. Unless you shouldn't, which in this particular case you might find out the cost much much later. Possibly even too late.

I use the coagucheck meter and this service and my meter, supplies and recording service cost me nothing... $zero. Medical testing supplies are covered 100% by my insurance. Its not without its issues for some apparently, but Ive found it extremely trouble free (for the most part) I had an issue once a while back when they did send me a bill. It was when they changed hands a few years ago but they corrected it and were very apologetic.
 

slipkid

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Jun 12, 2014
Messages
326
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Schwenksville, PA, USA
Well this is weird - but not unexpected.

I posted earlier in this thread about how long it was taking Biotel Heart / whatever they are called now to bill me - almost an entire year....and that BC/BS denied some claims that finally were posted this year but dating back to last year.

I just got a new "EOB" statement from BC/BS and according to that Biotel has billed me (through BC/BS) another 4 times!! Of those 3 are repeat bills with same date of service which BC/BS already turned down because the billing period was too old but are indicated now as "we already have this claim". The other one is denied because "This service was submitted for payment after the claim filing limit", which actually makes no sense because that bills date of service is this March (not last year like the others). I've been through this sort of thing b4 in this bizarro world of American Healthcare. The provider will just keep on submitting the bills until they go through somehow. And God only knows how much BC/BS is even going to allow (in the past there have been bills which were allowed, then changed by BC/BS to a lower amount, then resubmitted by a hospital ONE YEAR LATER, then allowed at the original billing amount).....
 

almost_hectic

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Messages
752
Location
naples, florida
The healthcare billing and payment systems in the US are so complex its beyond ridiculous. Billers know all the ins and outs and back doors to submit bills for payment any and every which way. I think the insurance carriers have to know they are being bilked over and over again. Even the racket of providers discounting services for preferred policy holders or plans, you know they don't just forgive the dollar amounts for those discounts, those numbers I assume have to be moved to another column on the spreadsheet where they take billions in write offs. The system is likely being taken advantage of from both sides and its just an unspoken agreement among them to continue to rake in the dollars from us poor saps who pay the premiums. Imagine what healthcare would cost if you weren't charged $30 for an aspirin, or $1,000 for an X-ray just because insurance can discount it and then pay half.
 

tom in MO

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MO USA
I know it has been said before, but I am so glad I don't live under the American system of health care! Here in the UK my ambulance to hospital, tests, OHS for the valve replacement and then an operation for a pacemaker to be inserted were free. I bought my own INR meter directly from Roche (£299 / US$415 in 2014, still the same price if I needed one today), test weekly using strips provided on prescription (which would be £10 / US$13.90 per 24 strips if I had to pay, but like approx 90% of people my prescriptions are free). I provide a test result once every 2 months or so to my local anticoagulation clinic, but if I needed their help for something this can be done any time. No charge.

My elderly mother had a tissue valve inserted in 2009. Her hospital bed overlooked the Houses of Parliament, though apparently the food was not great. She had a small stroke a few years ago, and fell and broke her hip in the street about 2 years ago. She has lost her mobility, and has been provided with a hospital bed with full electrical adjustment, for free, including delivery and set up to use at home.

Yes, we pay higher tax, and our system is far from perfect, but on balance I think it is the better approach to health care. And no, I am not a socialist :)
We've had people almost die on this forum waiting for the NHS to open up a bed for their valve replacement surgery. Scheduled surgery postponed until it becomes urgent surgery. In the US you schedule your surgery and have it when scheduled.

We've had people with life altering symptoms waiting for months for a NHS specialist to see them. I can see a specialist quickly in the US if needed.

By the way, we have a national health system for the elderly. It includes home health visits and durable equipment such as beds. Just like the NHS.

Also, you are a socialist if you believe in socialized medicine. Can't escape that fact. The Marxist slogan, "to each according to his need from each according to his ability," is just a restatement of Christian principles. Socialism is good. I like all the Marxists...Karl, Chico, Harpo, Groucho, Gummo, and Zeppo :)

By the way I think of Andy Capp when I see your name. He is my hero, but he's from Hartlepool not London. :)
 
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almost_hectic

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Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
752
Location
naples, florida
We've had people almost die on this forum waiting for the NHS to open up a bed for their valve replacement surgery. Scheduled surgery postponed until it becomes urgent surgery. In the US you schedule your surgery and have it when scheduled.

We've had people with life altering symptoms waiting for months for a NHS specialist to see them. I can see a specialist quickly in the US if needed.
Very true, my private insurance at the time of my surgery was well worth the cost of it. I got the best care around and without a single delay. It was determined I needed surgery and it was scheduled very quickly. Every service I was provided was top notch and given without question. Payment was uncomplicated and straight-forward. The total bill was insanely high, but all I paid was my deductible and maxed my out of pocket expense. All total what I personally paid was like less than 5% of the total cost of my surgery and hospital stay. I wrote a check and said "I cannot thank you enough!"
 

Keithl

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Joined
Apr 20, 2019
Messages
495
We've had people almost die on this forum waiting for the NHS to open up a bed for their valve replacement surgery. Scheduled surgery postponed until it becomes urgent surgery. In the US you schedule your surgery and have it when scheduled.

We've had people with life altering symptoms waiting for months for a NHS specialist to see them. I can see a specialist quickly in the US if needed.

By the way, we have a national health system for the elderly. It includes home health visits and durable equipment such as beds. Just like the NHS.

Also, you are a socialist if you believe in socialized medicine. Can't escape that fact. The Marxist slogan, "to each according to his need from each according to his ability," is just a restatement of Christian principles. Socialism is good. I like all the Marxists...Karl, Chico, Harpo, Groucho, Gummo, and Zeppo :)

By the way I think of Andy Capp when I see your name. He is my hero, but he's from Hartlepool not London. :)

I truly think people in the US believe the crap they hear about why our insurance system is better than the rest of the world. Why are we the only major country without single payer coverage if the rest of the world is so messed up? I have friends that lived in Canada and the one thing they consistently say they hate about moving to the US is our medical insurance system. I have had people I know move out of the US becasue on their wages they can not afford adequate health care and are not offered it through their jobs. We still have our current insurance system for one and only one reason, the Insurance lobby funnels millions into the pockets of politicians and funds ads to scare people.

Ask seniors on Medicare if they hate it? They buy supplemental insurance to cover what Medicare does not, but if tried to take their Medicare away they would kill you. What about Social Security are you against that as well? Every study shows the majority of American's do not have enough saved to retire, so without Social Security they work until they die. The US is dominated by lobbies and they shape our systems, does not matter which political party you are from, they are equally corrupt.
 

slipkid

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Messages
326
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Schwenksville, PA, USA
Regarding complaints about the UK's NHS, I can't speak to experiences of everyone that lives in the UK, but can for the 30 or so friends I have over there that have had to get various types of surgeries over the years. And none of them have any complaints - they were scheduled & performed with no hassles and no one had to wait so long that they either died or their conditioned worsened.

My own limited experience with UK healthcare, when another American friend I was with over there with me on a trip came down with an attack of kidney stones & we had to take him to the nearest hospital, he was given fine & immediate care, admitted to the hospital immediately, with no fuss despite being a foreigner.

I would trade our for-profit totally broken and top heavy insurance driven health care system for "evil" socialized medicine any day.
 

tom in MO

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Messages
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MO USA
I truly think people in the US believe the crap they hear about why our insurance system is better than the rest of the world. Why are we the only major country without single payer coverage if the rest of the world is so messed up? I have friends that lived in Canada and the one thing they consistently say they hate about moving to the US is our medical insurance system. I have had people I know move out of the US becasue on their wages they can not afford adequate health care and are not offered it through their jobs. We still have our current insurance system for one and only one reason, the Insurance lobby funnels millions into the pockets of politicians and funds ads to scare people.

Ask seniors on Medicare if they hate it? They buy supplemental insurance to cover what Medicare does not, but if tried to take their Medicare away they would kill you. What about Social Security are you against that as well? Every study shows the majority of American's do not have enough saved to retire, so without Social Security they work until they die. The US is dominated by lobbies and they shape our systems, does not matter which political party you are from, they are equally corrupt.
Did you know that 11% of UK residents believe their insurance is inadequate and pay for supplemental insurance?

I know a Canadian who needed knee surgery. After waiting in pain for 1-2 years he went and had it done in the US and paid for it himself. He then needed the second knee done. Luckily the Canadian health system got around to scheduling his first knee's surgery in time to get his second one done. Canadians love to gripe about US health care, but then they do not move back to Canada. That's because in the long run, paying for health care in the US is a small price to pay for the advantages of living in the US.

Per Medicare, this is from 2019 survey.
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Keithl

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I think for Canada it is isolated, my buddy would tell me that on occasion you may wait for non-essential items, but that was not the norm. Would be interested in the stats behind the survey as every time medicare/medicad or social security comes up for reform it is considered the 3rd rail of politics, becasue no one wants it touched. If that many people were truly unhappy with it I would think they would be clamoring for change.

One thing I will also point out. Is as is very obvious, a large portion (I would argue majority) is extremely ignorant and uninformed about these things. The go through life and expect they will be able to retire at 65, get social security and medicare and be set. Medicare is not an all inclusive insurance and supplemental coverages are needed. I would not be surprised if those NOT happy are not happy becasue they want it to cover more. Medicare and Social security are not meat to be the sole way of supporting yourself in retirement and that is the fallacy .

"That's because in the long run, paying for health care in the US is a small price to pay for the advantages of living in the US."

Now you sound like my father. He had good medical insurance from his job his entire life, actually was in the group of people that got medial insurance from the job in retirement and was totally ignorant of what so many people don't have when it comes to medical insurance. When the median income in the US is $31K tell me how you afford health insurance when most of the low paying jobs do not offer it?

The healthcare industry and insurance are a profit first industry, nothing wrong with that as they is how they are structured. But anyone thinking either has your best interests as their primary goal is a fool.
 

dick0236

Eat the elephant one bite at a time
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I'm one of those in the "very satisfied" slice of pie. I've been on Medicare for 20+ years. It is the "best thing since sliced bread"😍..........BTW, I was a commercial (group) health insurance agent for 25 years prior to retirement. Few commercial plans are as good as Medicare but remember. Medicare is a "single payer" system and you do need a supplement..........or go with a Medicare Advantage plan, like me. No, or low, medical copays, drug copays, gym membership, dental and more.........and-0- premium (except for the Part B premium that is deducted from your SS check.
 

tom in MO

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Jan 17, 2012
Messages
1,759
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MO USA
I think for Canada it is isolated, my buddy would tell me that on occasion you may wait for non-essential items, but that was not the norm. Would be interested in the stats behind the survey as every time medicare/medicad or social security comes up for reform it is considered the 3rd rail of politics, becasue no one wants it touched. If that many people were truly unhappy with it I would think they would be clamoring for change.

One thing I will also point out. Is as is very obvious, a large portion (I would argue majority) is extremely ignorant and uninformed about these things. The go through life and expect they will be able to retire at 65, get social security and medicare and be set. Medicare is not an all inclusive insurance and supplemental coverages are needed. I would not be surprised if those NOT happy are not happy becasue they want it to cover more. Medicare and Social security are not meat to be the sole way of supporting yourself in retirement and that is the fallacy .

"That's because in the long run, paying for health care in the US is a small price to pay for the advantages of living in the US."

Now you sound like my father. He had good medical insurance from his job his entire life, actually was in the group of people that got medial insurance from the job in retirement and was totally ignorant of what so many people don't have when it comes to medical insurance. When the median income in the US is $31K tell me how you afford health insurance when most of the low paying jobs do not offer it?

The healthcare industry and insurance are a profit first industry, nothing wrong with that as they is how they are structured. But anyone thinking either has your best interests as their primary goal is a fool.
The statement you quoted applies to Canadians who are free to return home but does not apply to US citizens.

When the median income in the US is $31K tell me how you afford health insurance when most of the low paying jobs do not offer it? For US citizens, I have friends and family that had trouble getting insurance. That ended with the Affordable Care Act. Many w/o insurance now have it. That's why even Trump could not kill it. But I still have family members and friends that do not have health insurance. That's because they value vacations in Brazil and Puerto Rico, new automobiles, an extra property lot, or the freedom of no job. They are young, stupid and all have made a choice of no insurance and more disposable income. They could have chosen less luxury. I have a friend who has been unemployed for many years, a Trumper, but he loves his Affordable Care Act insurance and always finds the money for premiums. He's happy with it and had minor surgery this year and last. The irony is he hates Obama, but loves the insurance.
 

Keithl

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Messages
495
The statement you quoted applies to Canadians who are free to return home but does not apply to US citizens.

When the median income in the US is $31K tell me how you afford health insurance when most of the low paying jobs do not offer it? For US citizens, I have friends and family that had trouble getting insurance. That ended with the Affordable Care Act. Many w/o insurance now have it. That's why even Trump could not kill it. But I still have family members and friends that do not have health insurance. That's because they value vacations in Brazil and Puerto Rico, new automobiles, an extra property lot, or the freedom of no job. They are young, stupid and all have made a choice of no insurance and more disposable income. They could have chosen less luxury. I have a friend who has been unemployed for many years, a Trumper, but he loves his Affordable Care Act insurance and always finds the money for premiums. He's happy with it and had minor surgery this year and last. The irony is he hates Obama, but loves the insurance.
I agree with much of this, and do not pretend to be an expert on the ACA, but there are some states that did not sign on for parts and thus still makes the best affordable options unavailable. Also taking the mandate away drove rates up still leaving some people out. I also don’t think that “everyone that wants insurance has it’ because I have seen many complaints about the rates as well. In the end single payer is the best option, even if it covers catastrophic and preventive coverage as a start. Then offer supplemental coverage to fill in the gaps.
 

RAS

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Also taking the mandate away drove rates up still leaving some people out. I also don’t think that “everyone that wants insurance has it’ because I have seen many complaints about the rates as well.
ACA and US health insurance in general is quite a complex topic, but for what it's worth, here's my personal experience...

I have ACA insurance (I'm retired, but still short of Medicare age). The premiums have come down each year I have used ACA. The premium amount I pay is far less than what I would have paid for employer insurance and at present less than what I would pay for a Medicare Advantage plan. The ACA plans I selected each year had higher deductibles than my previous employer plan, but overall my expenses have been significantly less.

My biggest concern with the ACA originally was the limit on income. Above the income limit the subsidy dropped to $0 and all of the premium would come out of pocket. ACA law changes this spring eliminated that income limit. In addition the max premium dropped from 9.83% of income to 8.5% of income. In other words the subsidy increased. So my premium is even lower now than earlier this year and I no longer have to worry about limiting retirement account withdrawals or limiting realized capital gains to stay below an income cliff. Of course individual premium responsibility still rises with income, but it is manageable.

Whether it is Medicaid, ACA, or Medicare, substantial US healthcare expenses are subsidized by the government. Even employer insurance is indirectly subsidized in the form of tax deductions for premiums. That said I think the fragmented structure, overlapping Federal and State responsibilities, and many 3rd party administrators (Healthcare insurers) result in a tremendous amount of inefficient administrative overhead expense in healthcare in the US.
 
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Keithl

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I am glad ACA is doing better, but we know any time the GOP is in charge it comes under attack. You would think after almost 10 years of attacking it and having 2 years of all 3 branches being GPO and not dismantling it they would give up. I do wish they would love Medicare to 62 or even 60. ;)
 

slipkid

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I am of the opinion (and I could be wrong) that the GOP attacks ACA relentlessly because they don't like anything done by the other party to appear to be a good accomplishment. If they had authored it it would be the other way around. It's all about mudslinging.
 

Keithl

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I am of the opinion (and I could be wrong) that the GOP attacks ACA relentlessly because they don't like anything done by the other party to appear to be a good accomplishment. If they had authored it it would be the other way around. It's all about mudslinging.
I agree that is part of their motivation. They are the "my way or the highway" party as evident and McConnel swore to block everything Obama was doing as a blanket statement without knowing anything. And as much and McConnel and Biden worked together for years, now that GOP is not in power he wants to block as much as possible.
 
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