PVC's / arrythmias

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Christine

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I have a question for anyone who suffers from PVCs or any type of arrythmias.. mine were diagnosed as not life threatening 2 years ago.. just a nuisance so to speak.. not medicated for them.. during the day, not too bad, actually quite normal with just a few pvcs.. but lately when I lay down, they seem to act up more often.. sometimes the side I lay on will start or stop them.. maybe it's the caffiene, I take extra mag but not really doing anything.. i made an appt for next week to make sure nothing major is going on.. anyone else deal or dealt with this.. thanks
 

Debrinha GT

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I know how you feel!

I know how you feel!

Do you get them on and off? How strong and how long do they last in general? I sometimes have palpitations that feel like an off balance washing machine. On some occasions, my heart races for a few seconds and then skips a couple of beats before it goes back to nomral and there are other times when it just beats really fast for a couple of minutes and then slows down. I take propranolol40mg every night and sometimes I resort to lorax1mg if I know it's because I've been under a lot of stress. I must say though it's a horrible sensation as if the air just isn't getting in. I've discussed it with my cardio a few times, but he says it's nothing to worry about. Hope you get better soon.
Débora
 
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Yaps

Guest
It seems I have them constantly :eek: , doc hasnt said anything except continue meds.. :eek:
 

Marguerite53

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May 18, 2004
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good idea to check it out

good idea to check it out

Hi Christine. I've been experiencing PVC's for years, I guess, but just got around to identifying them as such when, like you, they came on at night and just wouldn't settle down. I couldn't sleep. My GP caught them on an EKG and sent me to the cardio. We did an echo for my peace of mind (it had been 6 months anyway) and everything else was fine, but they did show up. She said they were of no concern. She put me on Atenolol. I am on Diovan 80mg for blood pressure control, and now the Atenolol 25mg for the PVC's. Both of these meds, I'm told by the pharmacist work to help reduce blood pressure, but by different means. Pharmacist also said that in Europe they tend to try several different kinds of meds simultaneously, directing each at a different element of the problem, rather than just increase the dosage on one kind of blood pressure med. My BP has never really been over 140/80, but with the AS she wanted it down. The Atenolol is a beta blocker. I LOVE the Atenolol. It has calmed me right down.

One thing my cardio said was that she doesn't know why, but the most her patients complain about PVCs is during November through March. She wonders if it doesn't have something to do with stress and chocolates over the holidays!! My husband had finally convinced me that red wine was a good idea so I started having a glass several times a week. My PVC's came back with a vengeance. No more red wine for me. I also noticed that chocolate is a definite instigator. No more chocolates or decaf mochas unless I don't mind feeling all jumpy and thumpy. Coffee and caffeine have given me the shakes for years so I rarely drink anything but decaf (but I do have 2 cups of decaf a day). Even green tea gets me rolling in arythmias now and I just adore those Arizona green iced teas!!

See what the doctor says. Then stop your caffeine. If you are prescribed a beta blocker, see how that fares for you (read the labels because they are a pretty serious med. Can't just decide to stop them on your own, etc.) And just for me, would you ask the doctor why it is, if the heart is all screwy and jumping all catty-whampus and missing beats or starting up before it's supposed to -- how come that isn't a concern? I don't get it!! :confused:

Good luck and get back to us!

Marguerite
 
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Christine

Guest
thanks all for your input.. guess I should say, i'm already on a beta blocker.. Toprol XL and Accupril for BP (i'm on the pill so my bp raises) i've been on a beta blocker since surgery in the beginning because of pvcs.. then they settled down and we kept my meds the same since it controls my bp.. but i guess my body is getting used to the toprol.. my heart doesn't race, just gets out of rythym when i'm horizontal - and while i thinks it's caffeine related, I find it hard to believe it would only occur when i lay down due to caffiene. 2 yrs ago we decided not to medicate more since they weren't that big of deal and more of a nuisance, guess it's time to tweak my meds to speak..
 
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Mary

Guest
I've had PVC's for years. The worst incident landed me in the hospital 19 years ago during my 8th month of pregnancy. I was throwing 12-15 every minute, for hours on end. They decided it was the stress of the pregnancy, and since they were benign, it was determined to let them run their own course.

At that time, I didn't know I had a valve issue.

Over the intervening years, I have had episodes, but I don't believe mine were caused by caffeine (most common culprit named). Mine would flare with stress but the biggest trigger has always been my having a fever.
I guess my body recognizes the stress of the illness and responds with massive PVC attacks.
Interestingly enough, I've only had one or two since I have replacement surgery on the 7th. Go figure!
Mary
 

ALCapshaw2

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Mar 20, 2003
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6,910
Location
North Alabama
Caffeine is a MAJOR trigger for arrhythmias, especially PVC's. I 2 years post op I reached a point where even a very small bite of chocolate would trigger mine. I suspect a change in the condition of my Mitral Valve was the root cause. A low dose of Toprol XL worked well for me for 2 years, then I had to switch to Sotalol (generic form of BetaPace) which is a more powerful anti-arrhythmic that targets Atrial Fibrilation.

Best to tell your cardiologist about this change in your symptoms. Change means that something is going on and it would be good to find out what. Hopefully he will suggest a Holter Monitor (24 hour recording) which will enable him to determine exactly what type of arrhythmia(s) you are experiencing, assuming they act up while you are wearing the monitor. There are also 30 day event recorders where you have to activate the recorder in the case of an event and play it back to the provider over the telephone.

Yes, PVC's are generally benigh but they can sure be 'uncomfortable' and leave you weak and tired. Christine L suffered with them for quite a while after her surgery. You may want to review some of her old posts or contact her via Private Mail.

'AL Capshaw'
 
G

Gero

Guest
Christine,

I too suffer from a frequent number of PVC's-started some 4 years ago. Before I was put on beta blocker, they were occurring 1 in two beats and I could feel every one of them. Since the medication, they are not there all the time but I will still get runs of them 1 in 4-5 beats other times 1 in 20 beats. As I am still awaiting surgery, I have an echo and review every 6 months and at my last echo (2 weeks ago) I asked my cardio about them. He said that they were harmless and I asked whether they would likely disappear after surgery. He couldn't answer that for sure,possibly,but said that this was not a sufficient reason to push the surgery forward. He suggested to increase the dosage of the Betablocker to see if that would help or he would refer me to a rythym specialist. I am reluctant to increase the medication just yet as it is quite bearable most of the time. It just is very uncomfortable when you get a run of them. I drink red wine and that doesn't seem to have any adverse impact on the frequency. I think for me they are more noticeable when I am under considerable stress. I really hope that they disappear after surgery as I understand exactly what you are going through.
 

Christina L

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Joined
Sep 2, 2003
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Location
Estes Park, Colorado
Christine

Christine

Yes, I have been plagued with PACs (same physiological symptoms as PVCs) but different I think in anatomy, before and after my surgery, although more so probably after my surgery.

I get them in spurts - I have them off and on for a while and then will get a bad spell of them. I agree with Al - chocolate triggers mine or if I am drinking too much "de-caf" coffee even, which is all I drink now, but I have to limit my de-caf to 2-3 times a week and one cup at a sitting at that. Also as Karlyn and others have said, STRESS is a major culprit.

I am trying-trying to get back into yoga, meditation, and deep breathing, but I am just so busy and STRESSED that I can't find the time. :rolleyes: I know I need to make the time!

I was tried on some beta blockers for my PACs but nothing helped. My cardio said to get used to them as they will probably be a permanent fixture in my life.

I don't necessarily accept that prognosis and feel that taking better care of my stress levels will be a huge step forward in my fight against these pesky PVCs - they are very annoying as any one who has them can attest.

Hope this helps some.

Christina L.
 
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Shine_on_Syd

Guest
How serious are PVCs?

How serious are PVCs?

Could some one please give a more detailed explanation of PVCs. My doctors seem rather nonchalant about them.
I certainly know what A-Fib is and feels like as I had two episodes following OHS and understand it is common in 25% of cases.
This past summer I experience some palpitations and was placed on a 30 day monitor and told I had PVCs. My experience since last summer has been minimal. My questions is I have no idea how severe can be. Just a blip or can they be deadly?
 
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Christine

Guest
from what i've been told, pvc's normally are not life threatening.. which is why they normally do a stress echo to confirm that.. i've been told not to worry but over time (it's been 3 yrs now postop) they've gotten worse.. not during the day as in the beginning, but now all the time when I lay down. so I guess it's time to tweek my meds so to speak.. will know more on tuesday.. thanks all :)
 
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Mary

Guest
Shine_on_Syd said:
Could some one please give a more detailed explanation of PVCs. My doctors seem rather nonchalant about them.
I certainly know what A-Fib is and feels like as I had two episodes following OHS and understand it is common in 25% of cases.
This past summer I experience some palpitations and was placed on a 30 day monitor and told I had PVCs. My experience since last summer has been minimal. My questions is I have no idea how severe can be. Just a blip or can they be deadly?
James,
As long as they don't get into a "rhythmic sequence" I was told I was ok. I assume they can be deadly, but it must be uncommon. I was getting long bursts of them before the surgery, and I would kind of stop and wait to see what was, or wasn't, going to develop. Mine have always been benign, and I hope they always remain that way.
By the way, check your PM!
Mary
 

Debrinha GT

Beloved Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2004
Messages
1,090
Location
Scotland
I get a bit mixed up!??

I get a bit mixed up!??

There are so many names to describe palpitations: PVCs, PACs, AFib, you name it!! But how different do they feel while you're actually experiencing one of them? I mean, skipped beats, heart race, when you get that weird feeling your heart's beating all over the place and so on??? How can you tell the difference between them?? I've always wondered and I'd appreciate your comments??
Débora
 

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