Post op complications

Help Support ValveReplacement.org:

Protimenow

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Messages
2,816
Location
California
If your INR was too low, you wouldn't have been given Vitamin K -- they probably gave you Lovenox (low molecular weight heparin).
 

carolinemc

Well-known member
Joined
May 31, 2010
Messages
726
Location
kansas city, mo
If your INR was too low, you wouldn't have been given Vitamin K -- they probably gave you Lovenox (low molecular weight heparin).
Mine was very low, so I was given Vitamin K shots in the hospital till the INR was normal while taking Coumadin. Ain't had no problems since then. Had a great Cardio at that time. From India. They are the greatest Cardio doctors. :cool:(y)
 

Protimenow

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Messages
2,816
Location
California
Vitamin K reduces your INR. It's what they give you when your INR is too high. Vitamin K is injected into the arm.

Lovenox is a form of heparin. It's injected twice daily into abdominal fat. It often leaves a very nice bruise. It's what they use to protect you until Warfarin brings your INR into range.

I've used Lovenox in the past, after I reduced my INR for medical or dental procedures.
 

carolinemc

Well-known member
Joined
May 31, 2010
Messages
726
Location
kansas city, mo
Oh you so right, my bad(used to be bag). Sorry, did Lovenox when I was off the warafarin when I lost my job and lost the insurance. I have to do it for Coloscopy in November, not lookin forward to it, but at least, hopefully, I won't feel a thing.
 

Protimenow

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Messages
2,816
Location
California
Lost job. Lost insurance. I feel for you. At least Warfarin is relatively inexpensive, even without insurance - but a doctor to prescribe it may have added a lot of cost to that. Here's where having your own meter, and being able to self-test (and perhaps self-manage) can help you get through this.

I hope your situation has gotten better for you.

And - getting briefly political - it would be good to live in a country where they view medical care as a human right. Then you, and me (and my poor wife), and millions of others wouldn't have to worry about when a problem is large enough to seek medical help, balancing that against available finances, and when seeking medical help is worth cutting down the number of meals we have for a few months.

End of pollitical comment.

Again, I hope your situation has improved.

I'm told that they use some 'pretty good drugs' when doing a colonoscopy -- the biggest problem for most people is that damned prep.
 

tom in MO

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
1,129
Location
MO USA
Lost job. Lost insurance. I feel for you. At least Warfarin is relatively inexpensive, even without insurance - but a doctor to prescribe it may have added a lot of cost to that. Here's where having your own meter, and being able to self-test (and perhaps self-manage) can help you get through this.

I hope your situation has gotten better for you.

And - getting briefly political - it would be good to live in a country where they view medical care as a human right. Then you, and me (and my poor wife), and millions of others wouldn't have to worry about when a problem is large enough to seek medical help, balancing that against available finances, and when seeking medical help is worth cutting down the number of meals we have for a few months.

End of pollitical comment.

Again, I hope your situation has improved.

I'm told that they use some 'pretty good drugs' when doing a colonoscopy -- the biggest problem for most people is that damned prep.
If you don't like the normal prep, and don't mind enemas, you can do back to back enemas an hour or so before the procedure instead. It's not offered any more but used to be, and if you ask they will let you.
 

Rainbow

Active member
Joined
Jun 24, 2019
Messages
27
Hi Team. So back to hospital we go again. This time it’s a pulmonary embolism. They are treating it with drugs and hoping it will break up and disperse but have to wait for CT scan to see how it’s going.
 

Seaton

Well-known member
Joined
May 13, 2015
Messages
320
Location
London, UK
Hi Team. So back to hospital we go again. This time it’s a pulmonary embolism. They are treating it with drugs and hoping it will break up and disperse but have to wait for CT scan to see how it’s going.
Really sorry to hear that, @Rainbow.
Hoping things can be resolved well and quickly and better health can progress.
Sending good thoughts to your husband and yourself for the days ahead.
 
Last edited:

pellicle

Professional Dingbat
Joined
Nov 4, 2012
Messages
6,593
Location
Queensland, OzTrayLeeYa
Hi Team. So back to hospital we go again. This time it’s a pulmonary embolism. They are treating it with drugs and hoping it will break up and disperse but have to wait for CT scan to see how it’s going.
Hey ... there's often a few bumps in the road to recovery.

I hope this resolves quickly and moves into the "simple recovery" phase :)

Best Wishes
 

Brynn

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2015
Messages
11
Location
Southport nc us
My surgery in 2004 resulted in a pericardial effusion 2 weeks after going home. Ended up back in ER and had a Pulp Fiction moment, no anesthesia, just direct jab into chest to drain 2000 kg of fluid. I stayed in the hospital longer for that recovery than I did for the surgery. I also, gain 15ibs in hospital when they weighed me post surgery 3 days later,it was so gross, way too much fluid. I am facing my 3rd surgery thursday, many procedures to be done. Ascending aorta, root and BAV replacements, VSD repair and ligation and ablation to correct arrhythmia and afib/flutter.
 

pellicle

Professional Dingbat
Joined
Nov 4, 2012
Messages
6,593
Location
Queensland, OzTrayLeeYa
Hi Team. So back to hospital we go again. This time it’s a pulmonary embolism. They are treating it with drugs and hoping it will break up and disperse but have to wait for CT scan to see how it’s going.
a rocky road recovery it seems ... keep strong and just patiently follow it all through ... that's why we're called patients ;-)
Some words from Marcus Aurelius:


we always say "you can be anything you want to be" ... this includes strong

Best Wishes
 

Ladybug

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 30, 2019
Messages
52
My surgery in 2004 resulted in a pericardial effusion 2 weeks after going home. Ended up back in ER and had a Pulp Fiction moment, no anesthesia, just direct jab into chest to drain 2000 kg of fluid. I stayed in the hospital longer for that recovery than I did for the surgery. I also, gain 15ibs in hospital when they weighed me post surgery 3 days later,it was so gross, way too much fluid. I am facing my 3rd surgery thursday, many procedures to be done. Ascending aorta, root and BAV replacements, VSD repair and ligation and ablation to correct arrhythmia and afib/flutter.
I’m holding best hopes for you to have a great outcome. This can’t be easy. What a trooper you must be. Just hang in there. Surely better days are ahead.
 

tom in MO

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
1,129
Location
MO USA
My surgery in 2004 resulted in a pericardial effusion 2 weeks after going home. Ended up back in ER and had a Pulp Fiction moment, no anesthesia, just direct jab into chest to drain 2000 kg of fluid. I stayed in the hospital longer for that recovery than I did for the surgery. I also, gain 15ibs in hospital when they weighed me post surgery 3 days later,it was so gross, way too much fluid. I am facing my 3rd surgery thursday, many procedures to be done. Ascending aorta, root and BAV replacements, VSD repair and ligation and ablation to correct arrhythmia and afib/flutter.
Good luck! Hoping all goes well. Pretty soon you will be back doing "beachbody HIIT workouts with light weights, tennis, golf, biking 25/30 miles a ride, devoting 1.5 hrs a day everyday to exercise." :)
 


Top