Pls if anyone has their valve replaced with the inspiris resilia comment.

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esvaja

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Joined
Feb 20, 2011
Messages
130
Location
ann arbor michigan
I'm having my Edwards Bovine replaced with a inspiris resilia valve. How is it working for you?. Any feelings of improvement?
or anything to mention. Who here has had it the longest?
pls & thx
 

Seaton

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Joined
May 13, 2015
Messages
442
Location
London, UK
Greetings @esvaja

Hope you are well.

I had an Inspiris Resilia implanted in London in August 2019. I’d just gone 61. I feel lucky to have got it done pre pandemic.

My immediate recovery afterwards was relatively smooth, with only one trip to the Emergency Department a month post surgery with a fever, chest pain and breathlessness. Transpired I had a pleural effusion and UTI, which was treated and eventually resolved with antibiotics.

Rehab two months or so later was helpful to both mind and body.

I had a hospital emergency stay of four days the following January (2020) with pericarditis (the team thought at first I might have endocarditis).

But other than those few bumps in the post-surgery road, all else has been hunky dory.

The Inspiris seems to be holding up perfectly. It continues to function magically without issue. I no longer have the breathlessness I was getting pre surgery, I feel much less exhausted on exertion.

I take one 75mg aspirin daily with food as prescribed by the cardiac doctor as a “thromboembolic prophylaxis”. Other than that no other meds.

My scar has healed nicely. I had a mini-sternotomy, so not the full cut. An approximate four inch incision. My surgeon specialised in the technique, apparently.

The valve has been working like a dream so far. I mostly forget it’s there except for occasionally sensing its rhythmic beat thrumming lightly as I lay in bed.

A cardiac follow-up in late December 2019 showed the valve to be “well seated ... with good function”. No deterioration. Blood pressure normal, heart rate stable.

But I do have 1st degree heart block though (PR 227ms). It seems this was caused by the surgery as it hadn’t been noted in echos pre surgery. I had slight bundle branch block post surgery, too but was told this had became a non issue in the days following my surgery. Whether that is related to the heart block issue I’m not sure.

But regarding the Inspiris Resilia, my experience has so far been satisfactory. Long may it continue!

It’ll be two years for me this coming August since implant. There are a few on here now who have had their Inspiris valve a few years longer. They may chime in.

I wish you all the best with your re-op and a smooth experience with your new Inspiris. Anything else you think I can help with, please ask.

Onwards ...

*Should you be at all interested, I wrote three lengthy posts about my bicuspid valve to Resilia experience: here, here and here. 😎
 
Last edited:

stephenismycopilot

Active member
Joined
Jan 15, 2020
Messages
35
Location
Los Angeles, California
A little over a year with my Inspiris Resilia here. Baby aspirin every morning, along with carvedilol for blood pressure. I have a follow up echo in May, but it's routine. All follow ups after surgery show it was successful and the valve is working like a champion. As for me, I made some big lifestyle changes and feel better physically than I have in many years. Mentally, well, coming out of heart surgery, getting on beta blockers, and then immediately tumbling into a year long quarantine alone at home wouldn't be good for anyone. But I'll be fully vaccinated in a couple weeks and look forward to putting the valve through its paces later this year.
 

esvaja

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 20, 2011
Messages
130
Location
ann arbor michigan
Thank you for your responses!!! Is there anybody else out there with the Inspiris Resilia? Is that because it's only been out in the States for 2-3 yrs?
 

newarrior

I have mild moderate Aortic Stenosis live Bangkok
VR.org Supporter
Joined
Jun 29, 2019
Messages
487
Location
Bangkok Thailand
Greetings @esvaja

Hope you are well.

I had an Inspiris Resilia implanted in London in August 2019. I’d just gone 61. I feel lucky to have got it done pre pandemic.

My immediate recovery afterwards was relatively smooth, with only one trip to the Emergency Department a month post surgery with a fever, chest pain and breathlessness. Transpired I had a pleural effusion and UTI, which was treated and eventually resolved with antibiotics.

Rehab two months or so later was helpful to both mind and body.

I had a hospital emergency stay of four days the following January (2020) with pericarditis (the team thought at first I might have endocarditis).

But other than those few bumps in the post-surgery road, all else has been hunky dory.

The Inspiris seems to be holding up perfectly. It continues to function magically without issue. I no longer have the breathlessness I was getting pre surgery, I feel much less exhausted on exertion.

I take one 75mg aspirin daily with food as prescribed by the cardiac doctor as a “thromboembolic prophylaxis”. Other than that no other meds.

My scar has healed nicely. I had a mini-sternotomy, so not the full cut. An approximate four inch incision. My surgeon specialised in the technique, apparently.

The valve has been working like a dream so far. I mostly forget it’s there except for occasionally sensing its rhythmic beat thrumming lightly as I lay in bed.

A cardiac follow-up in late December 2019 showed the valve to be “well seated ... with good function”. No deterioration. Blood pressure normal, heart rate stable.

But I do have 1st degree heart block though (PR 227ms). It seems this was caused by the surgery as it hadn’t been noted in echos pre surgery. I had slight bundle branch block post surgery, too but was told this had became a non issue in the days following my surgery. Whether that is related to the heart block issue I’m not sure.

But regarding the Inspiris Resilia, my experience has so far been satisfactory. Long may it continue!

It’ll be two years for me this coming August since implant. There are a few on here now who have had their Inspiris valve a few years longer. They may chime in.

I wish you all the best with your re-op and a smooth experience with your new Inspiris. Anything else you think I can help with, please ask.

Onwards ...

*Should you be at all interested, I wrote three lengthy posts about my bicuspid valve to Resilia experience: here, here and here. 😎
Thanks for the updates--what caused the pleural effusion ? pericarditis ? Amazing only aspirin ? No statins, bp drugs etc etc ? Are you on a heart healthy diet ? Thanks again and best wishes !
 

Daniel758

Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2018
Messages
22
Location
California
I'm having my Edwards Bovine replaced with a inspiris resilia valve. How is it working for you?. Any feelings of improvement?
or anything to mention. Who here has had it the longest?
pls & thx
Coming up on 3 year anniversary on April 17, 2021.

So far, so good. No valve issues at all, everything working as it should. (See other posts for details)

It is a new valve so who knows what the future will hold for it but, at the moment, I’m very satisfied with the performance and very grateful for the new life it’s afforded me.

Bottom line is I would not hesitate to choose this valve again.
 

jasond1979

VR.org Supporter
VR.org Supporter
Joined
Dec 12, 2016
Messages
21
Location
san diego
Just got my inspiris resilia on Jan 11, 2022 so far so good. For some reason I have to take coumadan for a couple of months to help the valve seat it. So far so good I was having a lot of shortness of breath. I’m 60 years old. My Dr Dr Baay wanted to do a freestyle in my chest but he found he could get a bigger Edwards valve in 25mm
 

stephenismycopilot

Active member
Joined
Jan 15, 2020
Messages
35
Location
Los Angeles, California
Chiming in a year later since the thread popped up again. I was 37 when I got my Inspiris Resilia in January of 2020 at the suggestion of my surgeon at UCLA, who lauded the advances in the technology and said, "You'd be crazy to get a mechanical valve!" He put in the biggest one he could fit. No issues at all. Since then I am healthier and feel better than I have in many, many years.
 

Alchemist

Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2015
Messages
22
Location
Sturminster Newton, Dorset, UK and Brittany, Fran
My wonderful Inspiris Resilia was installed by Mr. Livesey (currently St Georges, London) at the Southampton Spire Hospital, UK July 2018, aged 59.
I met Mr. Livesey in January of that year to ask if he would consider me as a candidate for the IR, he said then that he was just about to operate on his first IR valve, he thought I was an ideal candidate. My operation was elective and private, I basically went over the head of my Cardiologist in Poole because he admitted no knowledge of the IR valve. Shortly after he phoned me to chat about my experience as he had a friend in a similar situation. The stenosis of my bicuspid valve was 0.8cm but my problem, for the NHS, was that I was asymptomatic, only on the table did Mr. Livesey appreciate the urgency of the valve replacement. No medication since standard post operative prescriptions.
Those were the early days and it's marvellous to see many other patients in my age group benefiting from Edward's innovative valve.
Recovery was good, one A&E admission with costochondritis two months down the line.
Currently enjoying French Cardiology. The protocol for my IR is a thorough exam and blood tests annually. My Cardiologist performs the echocardiogram and emails his report within 24 hours to both myself and my GP. This is French state funded medicine, I pay 90 euros contribution which is refunded by my mutual insurance policy. Without blood tests in the UK I paid my Cardiologist around £650 for an echocardiogram and still had to ask for readouts and detailed notes to be copied to me!
I hope that helps, as we say in France, Bon Courage.
 

TellTaleHeart

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Jun 26, 2021
Messages
46
Location
New England
Resilia valve and Dacron sleeve for ascending aorta for me just 14 weeks ago. Currently halfway through cardiac rehab, progress in which I find slow, but I feel good. Only associated pain is skin sensitivity around incision, which is healing fine. It still Itches like crazy though. Next follow-up with cardiologist in February, presumably will get a clearer picture of how it’s all working out, and hopefully I’ll be told I can end the ”temporary“ warfarin and verapamil regimen in place to address post-operative a-flutter and minor effusion. Really, the toughest thing I’m dealing with are the physical restrictions imposed by therapist: weight training using no more than 10 lbs, avoiding hikes with any inclines, etc But that would be true regardless of the valve I suspect, and I just have to remind myself to give my 68 YO body time to heal.
 

toadhall

New member
Joined
Mar 29, 2021
Messages
1
Location
Wichita, KS USA
TellTaleHeart reply: Cardiologist had been following my congenital heart defect since before 2012 and I feel certain that I had COVID in January 2020 before it was publicly announced (I believe this exacerbated my condition to have operation 10 years earlier than expected). I had both a Resilia valve and Dacron sleeve for ascending aorta in April 2021 (turned 68 in August). Surgery was followed by six months dedicated rehab. Late Sept/Oct I finally starting to feel normal. I am grateful for my sister's health care assistance plus that the rehab was successful enough so that now I can hold my grandchildren in my arms and that I can walk several miles plus take care of myself in my own home. I did take Warfarin for 2 months(?) to prevent blood clots after surgery. Currently my heart meds are for HBP plus a low dose aspirin daily. My understanding is that I have the largest diameter valve they could place which will allow a possible TAVR(?) if necessary in the future.

At this point of my life I'm in agreement with Pellicle that I'd go to hospice before doing another OHS - which has changed all kinds of physical and mental attributes of my life. It will be interesting to follow various peoples experiences along the path of life experiences.
 

jlcsn2015

Liborio
Joined
Sep 21, 2015
Messages
219
Location
Toronto
As long as a tissue valve is made out of "tissue" what ever the name, the human body will attack it. So, if you dont mind planning to go back to hospitals, tissue is great "for my way of thinking", and as far as doctors, well, recurrent revenues are recurrent revenues, return customer is a bonus.
 

Superman

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Oct 3, 2009
Messages
1,442
Location
Grand Rapids, MI, USA
Chiming in a year later since the thread popped up again. I was 37 when I got my Inspiris Resilia in January of 2020 at the suggestion of my surgeon at UCLA, who lauded the advances in the technology and said, "You'd be crazy to get a mechanical valve!" He put in the biggest one he could fit. No issues at all. Since then I am healthier and feel better than I have in many, many years.
I’d be interested in his logic for suggesting a 37 year old would, “be crazy to get a mechanical valve!” Does he have a mechanical himself? Does he have a tissue valve? Is he taking warfarin for something else and had a bad experience? Has he ever had to make either choice for real? Or just in the hypothetical world of patients he likely will never see again? Odds are when you have to intervene again, this surgeon will have moved on.

I’m not saying your choice is wrong for you. I’m just questioning the idea that another choice is, “crazy”.
 

pellicle

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Joined
Nov 4, 2012
Messages
9,363
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Queensland, OzTrayLeeYa
My understanding is that I have the largest diameter valve they could place which will allow a possible TAVR(?) if necessary in the future.
Given your age at surgery I think you'll likely get a good run.

Sorry to read about your early exposure to the initial type, I hope you don't become a Long COVID sufferer.

Best Wishes
 

AZATADINE

Active member
Joined
Aug 30, 2021
Messages
29
As long as a tissue valve is made out of "tissue" what ever the name, the human body will attack it. So, if you dont mind planning to go back to hospitals, tissue is great "for my way of thinking", and as far as doctors, well, recurrent revenues are recurrent revenues, return customer is a bonus.
This must be the third or fourth time I've seen you chime in with this type of post recently. I dont know what you have against tissue valves but you clearly do have some issue or other and believe they are flawed from the outset and that its all about revenue for doctors.
 

MdaPA

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Joined
Jul 8, 2020
Messages
226
As long as a tissue valve is made out of "tissue" what ever the name, the human body will attack it.
What do you mean by the "human body will attack..." a tissue valve? Are you talking about rejection by the immune system? And what about in the situation where your heathy native pulmonary valve is used to replace your deceased aortic valve (called a Ross procedure)? Is your body going to attack that valve? Please clarify.

My understanding is that biological/tissue valves used for replacement are treated with a chemical that makes them “immunologically inert" reducing or eliminating the chances of the body rejecting them. And most mechanical valves are made with materials that do not cause the body to trigger an immune response.
 
Last edited:

Superman

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Messages
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Grand Rapids, MI, USA
Yeah, if the body “attacked” tissue valves, then anti-rejection meds would be the norm. They will begin to wear down and they can calcify again, but that’s not the same thing. And the degree to which this impacts any one recipient varies greatly. We’ve seen a couple years in here. We’ve seen upwards of 20 years for homografts (why aren’t they more common?).

I think it’s a safe bet that anyone planning to live 15 years or more after replacement can count on some kind of intervention on the future. What that looks like is hopefully evolving. But were it me, I’d mentally prepare for another OHS, and hope for other options. Knowing that my trade off is no warfarin, no ticking, etc - maybe that’s a fair trade. Everyone is different. For me, hopefully avoiding any future OHS was the preferred deal. An aneurysm proved that wrong for me the first time, but maybe second time’s a charm.
 
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