Medical ID's

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T in YVR

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Feb 22, 2013
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241
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North Vancouver, BC, Canada
Absolutely - I'm going to do this. I think you can buy them off the shelf, or else get one in which you state what you want it to say (anti-coagulated, mechanical heart valve, name, ph# address etc). I'm still researching it in my area. I'm sure many other who have one will chime in here.
T
 

dick0236

Eat the elephant one bite at a time
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Feb 10, 2007
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louisville, KY USA
I carry a key chain fob that identifies me as being on anti-coagulant. I also have a list of meds, valve replacement and current doctor/tele. no. attached to my drivers license in my billfold.
 

RobThatsMe

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Jun 11, 2001
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USA - TN
I have a gold medallion that looks like a coin, but with the physician symbol on the front, and the back identifying my condition,
AVR, Dissection, Coumadin. I think that anytime someone is in an accident, the medics are quickly going to open their shirt. The scare alone is a red flag, the medallion then lets them know the specifics. I also carry a more detailed medical card in my wallet, and also have one in my car, in the visor on the drivers side.

Rob
 

ski girl

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Sep 14, 2010
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Perth, Western Australia
I don't carry anything. If I end up unconscious, no doubt someone will be having a look at my chest and see the scar, listening to my heart they'll hear the mech valve, and then they'll know I'm on warfarin. And if I'm conscious, I'll be able to tell them. The anti-coags are really the only thing that emergency personnel need to be aware of and they'll figure that out quickly!

And if they're so hopeless that they can't figure out I'm on warfarin, well then they probably don't have much chance of saving me anyway. :)
 

pellicle

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Nov 4, 2012
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Queensland, OzTrayLeeYa
I have been told that it is ignored as they can be wrong or removed by some other aspect of the accident.

Testing is always done at the ER by routine.

I recall a fellow who had his blood type tatted on his wrist. Till he was informed it was wrong. So he had it turned into something else...
 

big_L

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Apr 3, 2013
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261
Location
Iowa
I ordered one. I just started wearing it, as I couldn't stand it resting right on the scar. It says:

Meds: warfarin
Mechanical Aortic Valve

I did NOT do the annual membership option. I just ordered the medallion. My wife wants me to go ahead and get the annual membership. I guess they keep your records on file and the EMTs can call them. We'll see - I hate to spend $35 a year for it.
 

epstns

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Chicago area
I've had the annual Medic-Alert membership for a couple of years now. i wear the medallion and carry the wallet card. Mine says that I had my aortic valve replaced, had bypass and have a pacemaker. It also states my drug allergies and a phone number/member number that a first responder can call for more complete information. I feel better knowing that this is with me. . .
 

chaconne

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Jun 30, 2011
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411
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Southern California
I have a custom bracelet made from stainless steel that's printed with info about my Mech and Warfarin. I only wear it when I'm cycling to work in traffic.
 

AZ Don

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Apr 23, 2013
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Phoenix, AZ
It's a good idea even for those of us not on a blood thinner. All I did was fill out a free medical id card (google free medical id) online and put it in my wallet in front of my driver's license. I figure if something bad happens someone will at some point look for my license.
 

Freddie

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Canada
Medical Alert is what I use. It has all the information on the back and I renew it every 3 years.
 

tom in MO

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Jan 17, 2012
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MO USA
If it's in your wallet and it's an emergency, the EMT might not ever look. As ski girl says, your chest scar and the tick when they check your vitals, should be enough. Even if it is a small town volunteer high school kid with no experience, I don't think they will drive any faster knowing you are on warfarin :) I do have two wallet cards, valve type and meds, but that's more to help me remember. I already wear a religous medal...five medals combined into one...that's enough protection for me :)
 

Luana

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I have no ID and see no need for one. I don't have the traditional sternotomy scar, had a mini thoracotomy instead, but one listen to my heart and the mechanical valve will be heard. Loud and clear. I figure it will be heard unless heart has stopped, and in that case it won't matter.

I do have the ID in my wallet from St. Jude for my valve, but as Tom said, it may never be looked at.
 

Lex Luther

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May 17, 2013
Messages
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Location
Houston Texas
I have a plastic band printed "Coumadin" plus a stainless steel band with medical alert and USB chip that fits inside with all reference information, cardio, surgeon ( in waiting room), medications etc. I checked with EMT's in my area, and they look and can read the info on the chip. The chip is easy to update. Believe I got it on Amazon for less, than $15.
 

Bina

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Feb 22, 2007
Messages
12,709
Location
East Ontario, Canada
My opinion is "Better safe than sorry" :) LOVE my Medic Alert bracelet.

Yes, I have a scar, visible sternum wires, audible mechanical valve, etc.....BUT if I am in an accident and another driver/pedestrian wants to help me, my MEDIC Alert bracelet
provides my basic info: Anticoagulated, mechanical aortic valve, arrhythmia.

I refuse to take a flippant attitude that once the paramedics arrive they should in an instant be responsible to detect my serious cardiac needs.
 

Greg a

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KITCHENER, ONTARIO, CANADA
my opinion is "better safe than sorry" :) love my medic alert bracelet.

Yes, i have a scar, visible sternum wires, audible mechanical valve, etc.....but if i am in an accident and another driver/pedestrian wants to help me, my medic alert bracelet
provides my basic info: Anticoagulated, mechanical aortic valve, arrhythmia.

I refuse to take a flippant attitude that once the paramedics arrive they should in an instant be responsible to detect my serious cardiac needs.
:thumbup: A GREAT REPLY :thumbup:


My bracelet is ESSENTIAL as my life can be saved but incorrect treatment could be fatal

MINE READS:

ICD
MitralV,ring
CABGx4 Diabetic
STERNECTOMY
Allergic Sulpha​

And above that is the 800 # of the 24hr central office and below is my ID #

My wallet card has most of my meds and a full list of my specialists will be given when the central office is contacted and they will be advised how to handle me with not having a sternum hence the term sternectomy and not sternotomy (that is obvious with the scar)


Medic Alert.org http://www.medicalert.org/

MEDIC ALERT CANADA https://www.google.ca/search?sourceid=navclient&aq=&oq=medic+alert+&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4TSCA_enCA359CA360&q=medicalert+canada&gs_l=hp..1.0l4j41.0.0.1.1729139...........0.fchKeEXcB3o&pbx=1





.

Click to enlarge SAMPLE :

mash-id-e1373662027366.jpg
 
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epstns

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One other thing to keep in mind -- If you are injured and remain in a working disaster area, it may be noisy. Are you SURE they will hear your valve clicking?
 

Rachel

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Feb 1, 2012
Messages
539
Location
Holland, Michigan
My opinion is "Better safe than sorry" :) LOVE my Medic Alert bracelet.

Yes, I have a scar, visible sternum wires, audible mechanical valve, etc.....BUT if I am in an accident and another driver/pedestrian wants to help me, my MEDIC Alert bracelet
provides my basic info: Anticoagulated, mechanical aortic valve, arrhythmia.

I refuse to take a flippant attitude that once the paramedics arrive they should in an instant be responsible to detect my serious cardiac needs.
I'm with Greg and I'll second that - seriously great post Bina!!!

I'm not on anything more than aspirin (for now - tissue valve) - and I wear a road ID - has all the necessary info on it - I've also got an electronic chip for when I'm out running.....you never know.
 
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Luana

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USA
One other thing to keep in mind -- If you are injured and remain in a working disaster area, it may be noisy. Are you SURE they will hear your valve clicking?
Probably not if someone put his/her ear to my chest, but a stethoscope does block some outside noise and if they can't hear my valve, they can't hear my heart beating either. More importantly, what is someone going to do at a disaster scene that would matter if I were or were not taking warfarin? In such a scenario, triage is the first thing going on, and there's nothing about my mechanical valve that should make me more likely to need treatment than someone who doesn't The most critical things for initial assessments are if the injured are able to breathe adequately and if there is any life-threatening bleeding.

Paramedics don't determine serious cardiac needs. They determine if you're breathing and your heart is beating and that you're not bleeding severely externally.

I don't feel unsafe without a Medic Alert bracelet. If I did, I'd have one. :)
 
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