Inspiris Resilia Aortic Valve failing after 1.5 years?

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ottagal

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How very unfortunate for this individual. One of the issues with statistics is we never know where we will fall. We all want to be in the 98% success rate etc. Here are the results from the Commence Trial. Hopefully, he will get some answers from his medical professionals as to why it failed. He is young and who knows whether other types of tissue valves would have failed, too. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/317577086_The_COMMENCE_trial_2-year_outcomes_with_an_aortic_bioprosthesis_with_RESILIA_tissue
 
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carolinemc

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Sometimes things do go wrong in a short period of time, and a do over happens. There are several people who have been through this. Some have had it happen within days of replacement. Hopefully, I agree with ottagal that this person and the doctors' find out why it failed. Hugs to all today.
 

Steve Brooks

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Apr 11, 2012
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Cary, IL 60013 USA
I agree, sometimes things go wrong. You can only hope for the best.

I chose the Medtronic hall mechanical valve for my aortic replacement in 1998. I was 46 years old at that time and did not want to go through another surgery later in life.

I just had the Mechanical removed and the Edwards Model 11500A implanted as a replacement two months ago yesterday. The mechanical valve was being monitored by my cardiologist with echocardiograms every six months. I should also say I also had an aneurysm at the ascending aorta that also demanded monitoring with regular CTs. Finally were at a point where a was sent to a teaching hospital who had a surgeon that specialized in re-do's. The issue with the valve was scar tissue related. They reconstructed the root at the same time they replaced the mech valve with the bioprosthetic valve, also repaired the ascending aorta with a dacron graft

I was told this would be the last time my chest would have to be cracked. If this bovine valve needs to be replaced when I am 80 they can resolve with TAVR. Also another upside is coumadin for a couple more months. After twenty years of coumadin it is really hard to imagine

Again we can only hope for the best and that best being a few more years to walk the earth and enjoy your children and grandchildren
 

pellicle

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Hi (and welcome)
I chose the Medtronic hall mechanical valve for my aortic replacement in 1998. I was 46 years old at that time and did not want to go through another surgery later in life.

I just had the Mechanical removed and the Edwards Model 11500A implanted as a replacement two months ago yesterday. The mechanical valve was being monitored by my cardiologist with echocardiograms every six months. I should also say I also had an aneurysm at the ascending aorta that also demanded monitoring with regular CTs. Finally were at a point where a was sent to a teaching hospital who had a surgeon that specialized in re-do's. The issue with the valve was scar tissue related.
I'm a little confused, are you saying that aneurysm was the driver for the replacement or was there some functional impairment to the valve from "scar tissue" ... was this pannus?

Best Wishes
 

ExC.Andrew

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Well, congratulations on results so far. Yes it is also great to be off coumadin One of the worst side effects of coumadin is the interaction with vit K which is essential for the good functioning of many systems in your body. (check out the Weston A Price foundation in this regard, short answer, take vit K *with* vit D or cod liver oil regularly, among some essentials)
 

Steve Brooks

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Apr 11, 2012
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Cary, IL 60013 USA
Hi (and welcome)

I'm a little confused, are you saying that aneurysm was the driver for the replacement or was there some functional impairment to the valve from "scar tissue" ... was this pannus?

Best Wishes
Yes it was the aneurysm that did ultimately triggered all. For 5 years I had been warned by my regular cardiologist that I would most likely need to go under the knife again at some point. My regular cardiologist told me either the aneurysm dimensions or level of regurgitation at the valve would trigger resolution for both. Eventually I had crossed the line between acceptable and not on the aneurysm. My valve at the time was graded as high moderate but close to the severe threshold. My regular cardiologist did perform an angiogram at a local hospital prior to referring me to the surgical specialist in the big city and said that end looked good with no blockages. When I met with the surgeon (who also repeated tests my cardiologist had done just weeks earlier echo and CT) said he reviewed the angiogram films and said that he would be doing a single bypass along with everything else. I went under thinking they would be doing the bypass along with the valve and aneurysm. When I came out of it after surgery the doctor said he "felt the vein" during surgery and decided to let it be....so much for high tech testing.

Yes it was pannus that caused the valve issue. The ticking that most hear with the mechanical had gone silent almost 10 years ago. In a meeting prior to surgery he suggested that it was most likely pannus formation causing my issues with excessive regurgitation. I asked if he could just cut away the scar tissue and he said no. He did say upon initial inspection in the OR the valve was good mechanically. He did say they would be sending it in to be inspected by some agency
 

carolinemc

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Joined
May 31, 2010
Messages
726
Location
kansas city, mo
Well, congratulations on results so far. Yes it is also great to be off coumadin One of the worst side effects of coumadin is the interaction with vit K which is essential for the good functioning of many systems in your body. (check out the Weston A Price foundation in this regard, short answer, take vit K *with* vit D or cod liver oil regularly, among some essentials)
The thing to remember when on Coumadin(warafarin) is consistency, not the side affects. And there are people are that are on the Coumadin(warfarin) for life. When you eat, consistency is very important, more than worrying about side affects like liver damage, or other side affects that has to be monitored.
 

Ladybug

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 30, 2019
Messages
52
I agree, sometimes things go wrong. You can only hope for the best.

I chose the Medtronic hall mechanical valve for my aortic replacement in 1998. I was 46 years old at that time and did not want to go through another surgery later in life.

I just had the Mechanical removed and the Edwards Model 11500A implanted as a replacement two months ago yesterday. The mechanical valve was being monitored by my cardiologist with echocardiograms every six months. I should also say I also had an aneurysm at the ascending aorta that also demanded monitoring with regular CTs. Finally were at a point where a was sent to a teaching hospital who had a surgeon that specialized in re-do's. The issue with the valve was scar tissue related. They reconstructed the root at the same time they replaced the mech valve with the bioprosthetic valve, also repaired the ascending aorta with a dacron graft

I was told this would be the last time my chest would have to be cracked. If this bovine valve needs to be replaced when I am 80 they can resolve with TAVR. Also another upside is coumadin for a couple more months. After twenty years of coumadin it is really hard to imagine

Again we can only hope for the best and that best being a few more years to walk the earth and enjoy your children and grandchildren
Sending you best wishes. Sounds like you’ve been through it.
 

Protimenow

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Joined
Aug 10, 2010
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2,815
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California
Consistency is definitely important, so is regular (weekly, if possible) testing.

Vitamin K is important for our systems. It's Vitamin K1 that warfarin interferes with - taking K1 will reduce the INR.

BUT - Vitamin K2 apparently isn't part of the cascade of events involved with clotting. I've just started taking K2, and so far, my INR hasn't been effected. Taking K2 may provide some of the benefits of 'Vitamin K' without effecting INR.

I'll be testing again later today, and report if, after two weeks on K2, there has been any reduction in my INR.

If so, I'll report it somewhere on this forum.
 
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