How to prepare a house for homecoming patient

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joy

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
927
Location
Honolulu Hawaii
Ross is right, my doctors told me NOT to be dropped off at the door, he wanted me to walk all the time! I now walk over 4 miles at least once a day, I go to school, and I park in the farthest spot away from my class as I can(yes the farthest away!). I haven't been on much because at the moment, I am preparing the kids for their next year in school where they will be going to a hybrid school where I will be their learning coach, all the while I will be going to school taking 6 classes of my own, working, keeping the house clean and taking care of all the duties that a military wife takes care of.....
 

Michelle D

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Joined
Jun 14, 2010
Messages
620
Location
Florida
I am three weeks post-op and there are a few things that wouldve been nice. My husband gas been cooking dinner but I'm by myself during the day. As anyone on a low sodium diet knows the only way you can keep a low sodium diet is cooking real food. It wouldve been nice to have pre-made and froze some lunches.

I slept in my electric recliner the first week and that was great so that I wouldn't end up on my side or belly.

Soft PJs are the best, after being covered in electrode sticky things, IVs, and hospital gowns there is nothing quite as nice as being nice and clean in soft PJs.

I already had a few ice packs in my freezer and were great for my swollen arm.
 

Michellemar

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Joined
Mar 6, 2011
Messages
140
Location
Live near Santa Barbara, California, treated at US
Aha! This is where my Kindle comes in....over 200 books in it now and it doesn't weigh much. For older people (me) I prefer the bigger kindle DX to the new ones, I make the type big and the new kindles don't get enough on the age for me... But any kindle weighs hardly anything, the bookstore is in your hand and it takes all of one minute to download...buy thru Amazon, use you credit card and your downloaded books go on that, they email you the confirmation. Younger bookworms are alreAdy lnto this, but us golden years people...not so much... Now I have them, books...heavy!!
 

Lynlw

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Joined
Jul 15, 2005
Messages
6,541
Location
NJ
Aha! This is where my Kindle comes in....over 200 books in it now and it doesn't weigh much. For older people (me) I prefer the bigger kindle DX to the new ones, I make the type big and the new kindles don't get enough on the age for me... But any kindle weighs hardly anything, the bookstore is in your hand and it takes all of one minute to download...buy thru Amazon, use you credit card and your downloaded books go on that, they email you the confirmation. Younger bookworms are alreAdy lnto this, but us golden years people...not so much... Now I have them, books...heavy!!
Darn I wish you had a Nook, then you could lend my your books lol. Justin got me one for my Birthday this year. It MIGHT be hard to concentrate enough to read the first week or so, but after that it should be great.
 

hensylee

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Joined
Jun 10, 2001
Messages
11,656
Location
snowy - Sharpsburg, Ga USA
I agree on the kindle. I have the original kindle and also have about 200. It is easy to read in any light, very lightweight and all the things you say. I have given myself gift certificates and always request Amazon gift certificates when someone asks "what can I get for you?". I don't use gift certificates for anything but kindle purchases. That way I don't have to keep track and always know the balance. I got my 2 daughters and my daughter-in-law kindles at Christmas and they also love them. They are good for recuperating patients and will certainly develop a love for reading.

Lyn, I wish I could lend you some of mine cause I have a bunch I know you would love. Check out M. C. Beaton's "Agatha Raisin mysteries". Agatha is a hoot but you gotta start at book #1.
 

Tim F

New member
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
3
Location
Lexington, Kentucky
One of the things I've not found discussed much here is stairs. We live in a three-story townhouse: bedrooms and shower on the third floor, kitchen and dining room (with half bath) on the second floor, TV and recliner on the ground floor (no WC). Right now (pre-op), I run up and down these stairs a million times a day. It looks like I should expect to be able to do stairs post-op, but to be slowed way down.

Do I need to think about consolidating onto one floor? Or are a few slow stair trips a day actually a good form of rehab? I'm currently 47, vigorous, and not overweight.
 

hensylee

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Joined
Jun 10, 2001
Messages
11,656
Location
snowy - Sharpsburg, Ga USA
After surgery, the floor nurses had everybody get up early, walk the halls for a little while - one of those sessions taught us to go up/down stairs. Maybe you will get the same exercises. You might ask your doctor. I rather doubt you will be doing much stair climbing for awhile in the beginning, tho. You just won't feel up to it. It will all come; just remember the first few weeks are quiet ones and you will rest and sleep quite a bit. They might give you a schedule - they gave me an exercise sheet and I did those exercises faithfully several times a day. They were easy ones - and included walking (with someone at first - outside).

Blessins............
 

hensylee

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 10, 2001
Messages
11,656
Location
snowy - Sharpsburg, Ga USA
After surgery, the floor nurses had everybody get up early, walk the halls for a little while - somse of those sessions taught us to go up/down stairs. Maybe you will get the same exercises. You might ask your doctor. I rather doubt you will be doing much stair climbing for awhile in the beginning, tho. You just won't feel up to it. It will all come; just remember the first few weeks are quiet ones and you will rest and sleep quite a bit. They might give you a schedule - they gave me an exercise sheet and I did those exercises faithfully several times a day. They were easy ones - and included walking (with someone at first - outside).

Blessins............
 

pdxtom1

New member
Joined
Mar 6, 2011
Messages
2
Location
Portland, Oregon
A couple of practical things from my recovery (now two years ago):
1. Reading material is good. Daytime TV is very negative, unless (for guys) it's ESPN or the Golf Channel. Stay off it. You need positives.
2. Always have a glass of water or juice handy.
3. A comfortable chair or couch, and a way to elevate your feet.
4. Walk several times each day. It will start as very short, laborious distances. Set goals. When you hit a mile at a time, you're really on your way to recovery! I had many friends who took turns "walking" me, which gave my wife a little relief. It got to be a bit of a joke, "Who's turn to walk Tom today?" like a family pet. :)
5. Last, the warning about colds is spot-on. Put a hand sanitizer dispenser by the door, and make liberal use of household wipes for doorknobs and such. No one will be offended. For the first couple of weeks, it will be a good idea to avoid crowds. You won't be up to it anyway, but even when you begin to want to get out, caution is in order while you remain vulnerable.
 

jenebug

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2012
Messages
43
Location
Alabama
Hey Ross, I didn't read all the posts, so if I duplicate anything, please forgive me. I had OHS 15 days ago. Here's a few things that have made life easier for me:
Remove throw rugs or at least watch them very carefully, to prevent falls or tripping
Be prepared with extra throw pillows for the "favorite" chairs. It makes getting up and down a lot easier when the seat is a little higher
My recliner has become my place of rest, day and night. Getting into bed was not the problem- getting back up to an upright position was difficult without putting too much strain on the arms/chest muscles, or wearing out the helpers back!
Gripper footies are great, but watch that they do not cut off circulation around the ankles, if you have swelling, which I do.
My hospital staff told me to only use Dial antibacterial body wash on my incision. Having been a nurse for over 25 years, luckily I knew this one already. Family bought me about 5 bottles, and I use it for shampooing and everything.
Please remind the patient that just because they feel great, they still might need frequent breaks and plenty of rest for the first few weeks. I have found that the days I tend to over do it, is the times I end up having the rough nights.
Also, most of us senior citizens do not like to take pain meds very much. Assure them that taking the recommended pain reliever will not likely cause an addiction, but will make them more comfortable during the early stages of recovery.
Keep visitors to a minimum AND phone calls short!

Hope a few of these help you.
 

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