High Lp(a) increases speed of AVS progression

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tigerlily

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Could you explain what High Lp(a) levels are for someone a little less informed and slower on the uptake perhaps i.e. me. Thank you. I'm concerned because I had a tricuspid valve calcify when I was only 53.
 

Nocturne

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Feb 29, 2016
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Rhode Island
tigerlily;n885955 said:
Could you explain what High Lp(a) levels are for someone a little less informed and slower on the uptake perhaps i.e. me. Thank you. I'm concerned because I had a tricuspid valve calcify when I was only 53.
Absolutely. And yes, a calcified tricuspid valve at age 53 seems like a red flag for high Lp(a) to me. Have you asked your doctor to check your Lp(a) levels yet? It is rare for a doctor to check them unprompted, because historically there has been nothing they can really do to lower them (they are almost entirely determined by genetics). Niacin will lower Lp(a) but for many people even this lowering will leave them well above the threshold of extremely high risk.

Lp(a) stands for Lipoprotein a, which is a type of LDL cholesterol. It is a lot more dangerous than regular LDL, though, and it does not respond to diet, exercise, or even statins. It has been found to be causal for aortic valve calcification and AVS, as well as coronary artery disease. In fact, the variant allele I have two copies of (the variant at LPA rs10455872) is the ONLY allele on the human genome that has been found to be causal for AVS!

There is an excellent Facebook group run by Sandra Revill Tremulis, and I would highly recommend joining us. There are a lot of people there who really understand Lp(a) and what it can do. There is also a medication in the works that CAN lower Lp(a), by over 90%! That is HUGE news for people with high Lp(a) AND their families, because it is genetic (I have two copies of a bad gene that together raise my Lp(a) to 13 times the normal amount, triple the "extremely high risk" threshold).

My tricuspid aortic valve must have calcified prior to my 40s, and I was diagnosed with AVS at 41. When I first came here, the regulars did not understand the connection between high Lp(a) and early calcific AVS and I was told that it must have been my own fault because of lifestyle, and vilified by at least one individual on the grounds that THEIR AVS was due to GENETICS, while MINE was due to poor choices. I have never forgotten this and my heart goes out to people who come here with AVS due to high Lp(a) levels, and do not present with bicuspid valves. This forum is dominated by people with bicuspid valves, and that is fine, but they have a different set of issues, problems, and likely complications than high Lp(a) people, and the ones who do not understand can still make hurtful mistakes and come at us because of their ignorance. It turns out I am not the only one who has had this happen.

My advice - get your Lp(a) tested, and if it is high, go to Sandra's facebook forum, the Lipoprotein a Foundation.

Also, check this out:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6ed3DNRdkU

I have met Tiffany on the Facebook group, she is a lovely person.
 

Sharon K

Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2018
Messages
14
Location
Adelaide, Australia.
Interesting...thanks for the info Nocturne.

Do you think it's possible for someone with a BAV to also have this? My AVA reading has gone from 1.6cm to 1.1cm in just under a year....this seems very fast to me.
 

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