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Has anyone read any good books lately??

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Kathy McCain

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I am starting to do alot more reading lately. I used to read quiet a bit, but I seem to get sidetracked the past couple of years. My current read, which I have almost completed, is an old one called "Angela's Ashes", by Frank McCourt. I really have no idea what took me so long to read this, Mr Mccourt is a fabulous story teller! I certainly believe it deserved the Pulitzer Prize.

Maybe someone on this forum can come up with some good recommendations?
 

Duffey

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It's been awhile since I read this, but Gildead, by Marilynne Robinson is very good. It's a fast read and really made me think about life in general.
 

RobThatsMe

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Hi,

I just finished reading "The Lady With the Dragon Tatto" by Stieg Larsson I really liked it, but the first portion of it, can be slow going as the development of the charactors take shape. I just purchased one of the author's other books at the airport on the way to CCF called "The Girl who Played with Fire".

In the meatime, I am reading "Caught Steeling" by Charlie Huston. I quick read'" murder/crime mystery that my friend in Germany sent me.
 

kfay

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I also read The Girl with the Dragon Tatoo and am about halfway through the second one, The Girl Who Played with Fire. I agree with Rob that it took reading to about page 150 in the first book to actually get into the story, however, once I reached that point, I really enjoyed it. Rob, you'll like the second one, it picks up right where the first left off and is off and running right from the start.

Warning though, these books aren't for ones who don't care for violence!
 

Michelle D

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Frank McCourt also wrote 'Tis. You'd probably like that, I read 'Tis but not Angelas Ashes, but I've seen the movie. I'm revisiting Dalai Lama's Art of Happiness, that book is comfort food for me.
 

Kathy McCain

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Frank McCourt also wrote 'Tis. You'd probably like that, I read 'Tis but not Angelas Ashes, but I've seen the movie. I'm revisiting Dalai Lama's Art of Happiness, that book is comfort food for me.
Yes, I'll think I'll read 'Tis next. It's the sequel to Angela's Ashes. I have to say you really should read his first book. It was great!
 

sweetbanker

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Geek love is a good book by Katherine Dunn. Little strange Carnies make their own freak show by the wife taking drugs during pregancy , I couldn't put it down. Also Water for Elephants Sara Gruen this time a circus good book. Last summer was my summer of reading of Circus and carnies lol.
 

Luana

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Kathy,
I adored Angela's Ashes; there were so many parts where I was laughed out loud, very loud. Right now I'm reading John McCain's Faith of my Fathers.
 

Kathy McCain

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Kathy,
I adored Angela's Ashes; there were so many parts where I was laughed out loud, very loud. Right now I'm reading John McCain's Faith of my Fathers.
Yes Luana, I laughed so hard at so many parts of the story, as well as having tears in my eyes at others. I would highly recommend this read. Very moving and touching, as well as hilarious story. Let me know what you think of Faith of my Fathers.
 

Harrybaby666

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You know Kathy, its funny, but I have never been a big reader except for V.C. Andrews, Stephen King and Biographies, and I am thinking that part of the reason is that I don't have the space for a bunch of books....HOWEVER, I was thinking about looking into getting a Kendle as they can hold something like 3500 books and then I think I would do more reading....
 

Kathy McCain

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Harold I really enjoy biographies, and auto-biographies of fascinating/interesting people. Which ones have you read in the past?
 

Harrybaby666

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Well, I pretty much read about

Well, I pretty much read about

Harold I really enjoy biographies, and auto-biographies of fascinating/interesting people. Which ones have you read in the past?
anybody really...I read one awhile back about Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz...couldn't put it down...I read it in 3 days....I have a whopper of a book (800 pages) that I am going to eventually read about Bill Clinton (Its not a political thing, just curious) and really just about anyone that wants to tell his or her story....If Stephen King were to write one about himself, I would read it....its a people thing...I am fascinated by people and what happens in life good or bad....:biggrin2::biggrin2::biggrin2:
 

Duffey

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anybody really...I read one awhile back about Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz...couldn't put it down...I read it in 3 days....I have a whopper of a book (800 pages) that I am going to eventually read about Bill Clinton (Its not a political thing, just curious) and really just about anyone that wants to tell his or her story....If Stephen King were to write one about himself, I would read it....its a people thing...I am fascinated by people and what happens in life good or bad....:biggrin2::biggrin2::biggrin2:

Harry, I read the Lucy/Desi one when it first came out. Lauren Bacall wrote a good one about her life with Bogie.
 

Mentu

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Two Wonderful Books

Two Wonderful Books

In this past month, I read Three Cups of Tea and Stones into Schools. These tell the story of the work of Greg Mortenson who is helping communities build schools in Northwest Pakistan and Northeast Afghanistan. Mortenson and the people who work with him have been working to educate both boys and girls for the past 15 years in the area many people think of only as homeland of extremists and criminals. These books tell this incredible story of how people from different cultures speaking many different languages and following different religious traditions are working together to build a better future for us all. In one of the most poignant moments an elderly gentleman holds his family Quran and laments that he has never learned to read yet the first word of the Quran is "Read!" and wants his children, boys and girls to have the education he never had. These books teach a lot about the cultures of this region that has become so much closer to us since the first school was built and will leave you feeling both inspired and hopeful. It is a great story and because it tells of living people and their real lives it leaves the reader feeling more connected and in need of doing something even some small thing to make the world better. I don't know what more one can ask of books.

Larry
 
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Lily

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I'm slogging through Lorna Doone again; it's okay. I've been interested in the Waverley Novels for years and recently got an old set of them but haven't tried to dive in just yet.

Also, I saw today that John Ritter's widow just finished a book; and what I read about it sounded interesting. His televised memorial was the night before my valve replacement; it was further sober food for thought for us.
 

njean

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Two weeks ago, I finished reading "A Marriage Made in Heaven" or Too Tired for an Affair" by Erma Bombeck. The book will have you rolling with laughter at times and you will find that many of her experiences resemble your own! I absolutely loved it. I believe it was the last book she wrote before she died......so sad she left us so soon!

She was brilliant, witty and so down to earth.

Now I'm reading a medical thriller called, "Terminal Condition" by David Shobin.
 

Kathy McCain

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Some very interesting recommendations everyone!

Yes, Duffy I have read a couple of Lauren Bacalls books. I really like her style. It's hard for me to put her biographies down. Harold I'm pretty much the same. I'm usually game for any interesting, facinating, or famous person. I loved Katherine Hepburns autobiography, entitled "Me". Also, Kate Remembered was an excellent one. Can't remember the author, but I couldn't put that one down either. She was also one of my favorites of the old time actresses.
 

Dennis S

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I always recommend Desert Solitare by Edward Abbey. It is often on the list of the 25 best books by an American author. It is not very long, and a fascinating book about life, and the Southwest. Abbey was almost certainly an alcoholic, and wasn't with us all that long. I am serious about my Christianity and he was a scoffer. There are a lot of reasons I shouldn't have liked his book, but it is so good I couldn't help myself. Abbey sometimes worked as a park ranger in Utah. Part of the book tells of finding the body of a tourist who walked too far from his car, and died outside in the high desert country. I know it sounds gruesome, but it changed forever some of my ideas about a " good death". There are other parts of the book where he relates some of his experiences with tourists in the parks that had me laughing until the tears flowed from my eyes. I remember reading a "Tale of Two Cities" as a young teen, and the experience changed my young life. Years later Barb and I read"Desert Solataire" at about the same time. More than any other single thing that caused us to check out the possibility of living in the high and pretty remote mountains of Northern New Mexico. We have never regretted it. I think Desert Solitaire is the only book I have ever read multiple times.

By the way, I love this thread, and hope it stays open long enough to read, and make, other recommendations.
 

Eva

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I am fascinated by people and human's psychology behaviour and understanding "why we do what we do".

The last book I read was: "The Highly Sensitive Person-HPS". I loved it so much that I bought a couple of books and gave them as gifts to my nieces to help them understand the reason behind the difference in their kids' reactions to situations and to help their sensitive child to cope better as they are easily and more affected by what goes around them than others.

One example for those interested: 9-year old twins (boy and girl) go home after school. The mother asks about their day at school. The boy who is the highly senstive child here - tells his mom: my teacher looked sad today...she was not like every day and goes on describing the look in her eyes and all that he observed that was unusual!! The sister answered briefly: it wa OK...I enjoyed playing with my friends during the break.
 

Duffey

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I always recommend Desert Solitare by Edward Abbey. It is often on the list of the 25 best books by an American author. It is not very long, and a fascinating book about life, and the Southwest. Abbey was almost certainly an alcoholic, and wasn't with us all that long. I am serious about my Christianity and he was a scoffer. There are a lot of reasons I shouldn't have liked his book, but it is so good I couldn't help myself. Abbey sometimes worked as a park ranger in Utah. Part of the book tells of finding the body of a tourist who walked too far from his car, and died outside in the high desert country. I know it sounds gruesome, but it changed forever some of my ideas about a " good death". There are other parts of the book where he relates some of his experiences with tourists in the parks that had me laughing until the tears flowed from my eyes. I remember reading a "Tale of Two Cities" as a young teen, and the experience changed my young life. Years later Barb and I read"Desert Solataire" at about the same time. More than any other single thing that caused us to check out the possibility of living in the high and pretty remote mountains of Northern New Mexico. We have never regretted it. I think Desert Solitaire is the only book I have ever read multiple times.

By the way, I love this thread, and hope it stays open long enough to read, and make, other recommendations.
Dennis,
You've mentioned Abbey's book before, but this time, I'm determined to read it. Thanks! I'll send you a note when I finish it.
 
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