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KarenK

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Joined
Jan 14, 2023
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10
Location
NW Arkansas
Had first appointment with the cardiologist today. He's scheduled me for a heart cath in a week and I was told to bring a bag in case they have to put in a stent. I really didn't learn anything on the appointment. Doc wanted to wait for test results. This doesn't seem like the standard practice that I've read about on this forum. I haven't even had an echo yet.

It turns out what my internist did was some kind of doppler ultrasound and not an echo as I previously stated. My internist messaged me this morning which was a first and a bit unnerving. Not only did he want to know if I made contact with the cardiologist but to encourage me to go to the ER if symptoms continue. He waits 6 months to tell me test results and now he's concerned. That steams my buns!

Did anybody else's cardiologist send them for a heart cath first thing?
 

Midlo_dave

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Oct 12, 2022
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Hi Karen - are you sure you didn't have an echo? Echocardiograms look similar to an ultrasound. It would be hard to diagnose your level of aortic stenosis without an echo.

Catherization will definitely give your doctors some good pictures and information on your heart as well as the opportunity to address blockages with a stent.
I had one recently in preparation for valve replacement surgery. It is over pretty quickly, but takes some time for the anesthesia to wear off.

Keep talking to your doctors and ask a lot of questions.
 

Chuck C

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Dec 5, 2020
Messages
1,885
It turns out what my internist did was some kind of doppler ultrasound and not an echo as I previously stated.
Doppler ultrasound is actually a type of echocardiogram. This can be used to diagnose aortic stenosis.

Please see below.

What techniques are used in echocardiography?​

Several techniques can be used to create pictures of your heart. The best technique depends on your specific condition and what your provider needs to see. These techniques include:

  • Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound. This approach is used most often. It produces 2D images that appear as “slices” on the computer screen. Traditionally, these slices could be “stacked” to build a 3D structure.
  • Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound. Advances in technology have made 3D imaging more efficient and useful. New 3D techniques show different aspects of your heart, including how well it pumps blood, with greater accuracy. Using 3D also allows your sonographer to see parts of your heart from different angles.
  • Doppler ultrasound. This technique shows how fast your blood flows, and also in what direction.
  • Color Doppler ultrasound. This technique also shows your blood flow, but it uses different colors to highlight the different directions of flow.
  • Strain imaging. This approach shows changes in how your heart muscle moves. It can catch early signs of some heart disease.
  • Contrast imaging. Your provider injects a substance called a contrast agent into one of your veins. The substance is visible in the images and can help show details of your heart. Some people experience an allergic reaction to the contrast agent, but reactions are usually mild.

 

KarenK

Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2023
Messages
10
Location
NW Arkansas
Doppler ultrasound is actually a type of echocardiogram. This can be used to diagnose aortic stenosis.

Please see below.

What techniques are used in echocardiography?​

Several techniques can be used to create pictures of your heart. The best technique depends on your specific condition and what your provider needs to see. These techniques include:

  • Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound. This approach is used most often. It produces 2D images that appear as “slices” on the computer screen. Traditionally, these slices could be “stacked” to build a 3D structure.
  • Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound. Advances in technology have made 3D imaging more efficient and useful. New 3D techniques show different aspects of your heart, including how well it pumps blood, with greater accuracy. Using 3D also allows your sonographer to see parts of your heart from different angles.
  • Doppler ultrasound. This technique shows how fast your blood flows, and also in what direction.
  • Color Doppler ultrasound. This technique also shows your blood flow, but it uses different colors to highlight the different directions of flow.
  • Strain imaging. This approach shows changes in how your heart muscle moves. It can catch early signs of some heart disease.
  • Contrast imaging. Your provider injects a substance called a contrast agent into one of your veins. The substance is visible in the images and can help show details of your heart. Some people experience an allergic reaction to the contrast agent, but reactions are usually mild.


Thank you so much Chuck for taking your time to provide this very informative post! No doubt others will appreciate it too.
I still have a lot to learn, this is all so new to me.
Karen
 

Paleowoman

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Surrey, UK
I always understood that an echocardiogram is an ultrasound of the heart. My echocardiograms always seem to include 2D, flow Doppler - I've sometimes watched the screen and seen the colours of the way it presents the speed of the blood flowing through the aortic valve. I recognise the phrase 'strain imaging' so I guess I have that too.

I've never had a 'heart catheterisation' - I've had CT angiograms instead which are less invasive, but only as an investigation to see if there were coronary artery problems.
 

carolinemc

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Joined
May 31, 2010
Messages
1,371
Location
kansas city, mo
I always understood that an echocardiogram is an ultrasound of the heart. My echocardiograms always seem to include 2D, flow Doppler - I've sometimes watched the screen and seen the colours of the way it presents the speed of the blood flowing through the aortic valve. I recognise the phrase 'strain imaging' so I guess I have that too.

I've never had a 'heart catheterisation' - I've had CT angiograms instead which are less invasive, but only as an investigation to see if there were coronary artery problems.
Cardiac Cath is not an easy thing, but much has change in how it is done. I have had mine through the groin twice. They can now do it through the arm. I enjoy the echo, but hate the staying still with a bad back.
 
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