Foldax valve trials

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Protimenow

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ATHENS1964 - I'm not intending for this to be a pun, but I tried to read that morphology paper, and most of it was greek to me.
 
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On Foldax - My understanding is (hey guys, please correct me if you have a different understanding)

Their goal is to provide a heart valve product that will last “a lifetime” (Younger folks will not have to face the difficult decision of mechanical or tissue)

It will also solve the problem of not requiring a lifetime of testing and warfarin.

(To me, if Foldax can actually accomplish this, that would be remarkable!)

So as I understand it, first they have to get enough of these new valves implanted and see how well they perform, etc. To that end, as of June, 2020, 3 patents have received the new valve, all (more or less) through standard surgery (or some through minimal evasive surgery). (But not yet through trans-catheter methods).

BUT clearly they state their intent is to provide a “percutaneously product" (their words).

To that end, they have already developed a transcatheter prototype product and successfully implanted it in animals.

So it would seem, only a matter of time!
As I approach 80 with my increasingly failing valves, I only hope I can hold out until they get that transcatheter product fully approved and ready for ME!
 

Pete81

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Apr 3, 2020
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it seems that Foldax is much further with their valve as they are already testing in vivo but today I saw this post on linked-in from the university of Cambridge on their PoliValve which is also a polymer one, thought you might find this an interesting read: New artificial heart valve could transform open-heart surgery
 

Protimenow

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According to the paper, they predict that this valve will last 25 years. Thisis longer than most bioprosthetic valves (cow, pig, hippopotamus), but these are getting better.

The 25 year prediction, if accurate (and if this valve ever gets approved) is probably shorter than the actual life of the valve (perhaps it's wishful thinking), but many of us here have had mechanical valves in place for much longer than 25 years. Warfarin isn't that big a deal.

Perhaps, by the time this valve nears the end of its usefulness, other transcatheter replacements may become available. (One concern about failure of the valve - WHAT KIND OF FAILURE? - if leaflets weaken and break off, this can be catastrophic).
 

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