Extreme exercise

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rr3972

Member
Joined
May 20, 2011
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12
Location
California
My cardio doctor recommended that I don’t let my heart rate go above 150 bpm and not do do things like pull ups. I have a tissue valve in the aortic position and everything is good. I’m really missing pushing my exercise to the maximum, it’s fun for me. I used to ride my bicycle for hours at 150 and when I hit a steep hill I could keep it at 180 for 30 minutes maxing out at 192. IS MY CARDIO DOC OVER CAUTIOUS?
 

pellicle

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Nov 4, 2012
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6,896
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Queensland, OzTrayLeeYa
as far as I understand things (hopefully others can provide more) with a tissue prosthetic if you were able to do it before you should be able to get back to that again with training.

It was explained to me that the issue is pressurization of the blood system, which comes from squeezing all the blood, such as in the quads when straining a heavy squat combined with holding your breath pressurized (which squeezes the blood in the lungs too) rather than simply high HR from aerobic activity like spinning.

I must say that's a high number and unless you're under 40 (I'm guessing your about 47 or 48 now) I'm sort of surprised you can sit on 180 for so long, standard formula (220 - age) or some of the more finely tuned alternatives would put a max HR a bit under that number. I would wonder (not knowing) if that's not possibly doing you some harm.

I'd probably want to consult with an exersize physiologist. Dunno maybe @leadville may have some better feel for such things, myself back in my late 30's I knew that if I did more than 154 up an extended climb I could do it, but if it started raising to 160 I knew I'd burn out before I got to the top, and that was nothing like a 30 minute climb. I would not regard myself as athlete, just fit for my age (then).
 

R1Phrankey

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Mar 26, 2014
Messages
49
Location
The Netherlands, Europe
Do any guidelines exist on this? I have a mechanical aortic valve and am also riding my bike frequently (11.000 miles last year).
Several times a week I am riding my bike in my anaerobic zone (i.e. high hearth rate and blood pressure) and I am sometimes thinking on the possible negative effects of this. May it influece the valve? Do I need to be worried and keep my hearth rate in a lower zone?
 

dwhist

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Joined
Dec 30, 2011
Messages
139
Location
Elmhurst, IL
I bike about 3000 miles a year and my cardiologist who also rides told me to keep my heart rate below 150. I recently did a ride that was a long slow up hill and for an hour my heart rate was between 125 and 130. I am not a fast rider. I was able to show him the heart rate chart from my Garmin. He was very happy and said that showed my heart was working well and did not order a stress test this year.
 

nobog

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 14, 2019
Messages
48
Do any guidelines exist on this? I have a mechanical aortic valve and am also riding my bike frequently (11.000 miles last year).
Several times a week I am riding my bike in my anaerobic zone (i.e. high hearth rate and blood pressure) and I am sometimes thinking on the possible negative effects of this. May it influece the valve? Do I need to be worried and keep my hearth rate in a lower zone?
Don't worry about the valve - when the valves are under development they are cycled in an accelerated life tester at 1000 beats per minute so 150-200 is nothing, the valves are typically tested up to 500 mmHg with no structural detriment.
 

spartangator

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Joined
Jun 11, 2007
Messages
514
Location
Austin, Texas/Dublin, Ireland
This question comes up a lot because it seems like people get quite different advice so you're not alone in the wondering. While our cardiologists know best by their training and familiarity with our cases, it does seem hard to get evidence-based advice from care teams, as opposed to very conservation rules of thumb. I'm just writing all this to say you're not alone in your wondering.

For me, I just try to stick to being smart about things in the sense of not holding my breath when lifting and backing off when my heart-rate monitor points out things are getting too high. I recover a bit and get back to it, basically. I'm 100% not suggesting this for anyone else, just pointing how I've chosen to manage things the last dozen years
 

tom in MO

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Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
1,212
Location
MO USA
The only exercise I was told to avoid were those that require you to hold your breath, like some isometrics. I was told there was no need to monitor my heart rate once I finished cardio rehab.
 

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