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Edwards Resilia Inspiris Aortic Valve

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zelic

Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2017
Messages
9
Location
Midwest
Does anyone know where I can find out what hospitals or surgeons in the US are currently using the Inspiris Resilia valve. I've heard of people who have received the valve in Dallas, Minneapolis, Cleveland and I think New Jersey but I live in NC and I'm just wondering how I could find a surgeon who perhaps is using this valve who is located closer to me and what hospital they are practicing at. Thanks everyone and I apologize if this question has already been asked somewhere.
I had the Inspiris Resilia valve put in by Dr Schaff at Mayo in Rochester last Year. Best to call Edwards Scientific and ask them who is using it in the US _ https://www.edwards.com/aboutus/patientvoice.
 

Malleus

Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
7
Location
Evanston, IL
One more data point here: the surgeons at Loyola University Medical Center near Chicago have installed 20-30 Edwards Inspiris Resilia valves. I just got insurance approval for mine that should be installed at the end of this month by Dr. Jeffrey Schwartz.
 

Daniel758

Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2018
Messages
7
Location
California
Just an update for anyone interested in the Resilia Inspiris valve...

I had my one year anniversary last month with this valve and I have to say I'm pretty happy with it and the surgery.

I can neither hear or feel the valve anymore except on the occasional night when I can't sleep and it's dead quiet in the house. Even then it's barely noticeable and I really have to listen for it. At this point it doesn't really feel any different inside than my own valve did, which I'm very thankful for.

Health wise I'm back to working 8-9 hour days rehabbing houses (I flip houses for a living) with really no limitations now except for what I put on myself to not lift anything extremely heavy. Stamina is leaps and bounds better than before the surgery and seems to get better and better as time passes.

Med's wise I'm still taking a 1/4 dose of a 25 mg Atenolol and a baby aspirin in the morning. The Atenolol seems to keep the palpitations away. I rarely have any now, maybe one or two per month lasting for a second or two, and that's about it. When I don't take the Atenolol I may get a palpitation or two per day, and I'd rather not push my luck and have my old afib come back.

So overall, everything is going very well and I'm having no issues at all with the valve. Let's hope it stays this way and let's hope the valve lasts as long as advertised.

Good luck to all... and for any first timers out there coming close to your surgery date... don't stress out, seriously.

It's really not nearly as bad as you think it will be... yeah, it's scary walking through those doors but when it's over, you'll wish you had done it sooner. I wish I had.

It will give you your life back... and that's the best thing ever.
 

BillDaThrill

Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2016
Messages
7
Location
Los Alamos, NM 87544
Just an update for anyone interested in the Resilia Inspiris valve...

I had my one year anniversary last month with this valve and I have to say I'm pretty happy with it and the surgery.

I can neither hear or feel the valve anymore except on the occasional night when I can't sleep and it's dead quiet in the house. Even then it's barely noticeable and I really have to listen for it. At this point it doesn't really feel any different inside than my own valve did, which I'm very thankful for.

Health wise I'm back to working 8-9 hour days rehabbing houses (I flip houses for a living) with really no limitations now except for what I put on myself to not lift anything extremely heavy. Stamina is leaps and bounds better than before the surgery and seems to get better and better as time passes.

Med's wise I'm still taking a 1/4 dose of a 25 mg Atenolol and a baby aspirin in the morning. The Atenolol seems to keep the palpitations away. I rarely have any now, maybe one or two per month lasting for a second or two, and that's about it. When I don't take the Atenolol I may get a palpitation or two per day, and I'd rather not push my luck and have my old afib come back.

So overall, everything is going very well and I'm having no issues at all with the valve. Let's hope it stays this way and let's hope the valve lasts as long as advertised.

Good luck to all... and for any first timers out there coming close to your surgery date... don't stress out, seriously.

It's really not nearly as bad as you think it will be... yeah, it's scary walking through those doors but when it's over, you'll wish you had done it sooner. I wish I had.

It will give you your life back... and that's the best thing ever.
Thanks for the update, Daniel! Wishing you continued success, please keep us updated. Been trying to keep my eyes on the Inspiris as I've been in the "waiting room" for about a decade but believe my surgery time is near. I'm turning 50 next week, so beginning to wait/hope that the Inspiris is the way to go for me.
 

tidespring82

Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2019
Messages
12
Location
Kent, England
Thanks for the update, Daniel! Wishing you continued success, please keep us updated. Been trying to keep my eyes on the Inspiris as I've been in the "waiting room" for about a decade but believe my surgery time is near. I'm turning 50 next week, so beginning to wait/hope that the Inspiris is the way to go for me.
My two year anniversary is on the 17th may, and like Daniel I have never felt better. The Edwards Inspiris certainly seems to be doing what is says on the tin.
 

Malleus

Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
7
Location
Evanston, IL
4-year results of the COMMENCE study of the Edwards Inspiris Resilia were recently presented at a conference. Out of 694 patients enrolled in the study, none have experienced structural valve deterioration or valve thrombosis. Now, one wouldn't necessarily expect any valve to fail after only four years, but still this is encouraging -- and reassuring to me, as I'm getting one of these valves in less than two weeks.
 

tidespring82

Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2019
Messages
12
Location
Kent, England
4-year results of the COMMENCE study of the Edwards Inspiris Resilia were recently presented at a conference. Out of 694 patients enrolled in the study, none have experienced structural valve deterioration or valve thrombosis. Now, one wouldn't necessarily expect any valve to fail after only four years, but still this is encouraging -- and reassuring to me, as I'm getting one of these valves in less than two weeks.
Join the club Malleus, its really good out here with the Edwards Inspiris Resilia.
 

ATHENS1964

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 19, 2019
Messages
135

stephenismycopilot

Active member
Joined
Jan 15, 2020
Messages
28
Location
Los Angeles, California
This Tuesday will mark six months for me with the Inspiris Resilia at the recommendation of my cardiologist and surgeon. I am 38 (was 37 at the time), and had pretty much made up my mind to go mechanical after spending time on this forum. But the surgeon said – his words, mind you – "You'd be crazy to go mechanical nowadays." The idea is that because he was able to put in a large valve and because I did not have any other issues with the surrounding arteries, etc., that subsequent surgeries should be easier via minimally invasive or even TAVR. (Edit: my cardiologist is with UCLA Health, and my surgery was at Ronald Reagan Medical Center at UCLA.)

In terms of medications, I am on 6.25 mg of carvedilol twice daily, and a baby aspirin in the morning. Plus a big pawful of vitamins and supplements. My resting heart rate and blood pressure have never been better, and while I presented as "asymptomatic" when my valve regurgitation was discovered, my stamina and overall health has greatly improved since the replacement. While I've read lots of folks here who are getting on great with coumadin, in the three months post-surgery I was on it, we could never get it to stabilize.

It's a very personal decision, which valve to go with, based on a lot of factors. I'm grateful that this new generation of tissue valves was developed in time for my surgery, and I'll definitely keep everyone here in the loop as time goes on!

Stay safe, everyone!
 

Freebird

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 27, 2019
Messages
127
This Tuesday will mark six months for me with the Inspiris Resilia at the recommendation of my cardiologist and surgeon. I am 38 (was 37 at the time), and had pretty much made up my mind to go mechanical after spending time on this forum. But the surgeon said – his words, mind you – "You'd be crazy to go mechanical nowadays." The idea is that because he was able to put in a large valve and because I did not have any other issues with the surrounding arteries, etc., that subsequent surgeries should be easier via minimally invasive or even TAVR. (Edit: my cardiologist is with UCLA Health, and my surgery was at Ronald Reagan Medical Center at UCLA.)

In terms of medications, I am on 6.25 mg of carvedilol twice daily, and a baby aspirin in the morning. Plus a big pawful of vitamins and supplements. My resting heart rate and blood pressure have never been better, and while I presented as "asymptomatic" when my valve regurgitation was discovered, my stamina and overall health has greatly improved since the replacement. While I've read lots of folks here who are getting on great with coumadin, in the three months post-surgery I was on it, we could never get it to stabilize.

It's a very personal decision, which valve to go with, based on a lot of factors. I'm grateful that this new generation of tissue valves was developed in time for my surgery, and I'll definitely keep everyone here in the loop as time goes on!

Stay safe, everyone!
Thanks for the update. I too am asymptomatic and I have my surgery this week. Can you be more specific about how you are feeling better since surgery? Just curious.
 

stephenismycopilot

Active member
Joined
Jan 15, 2020
Messages
28
Location
Los Angeles, California
Thanks for the update. I too am asymptomatic and I have my surgery this week. Can you be more specific about how you are feeling better since surgery? Just curious.
I'm sure a lot of the folks on the forums here will agree with me on these points. My aortic valve regurgitation was discovered in a routine end-of-year checkup by my primary care physician, who immediately sent me down the hall for an EKG. Within a week there were ultrasounds, CT scans, an angiogram, and trans-esophageal echocardiogram. So in the space of about a week, we went from everything being normal to "You need open heart surgery as soon as possible." And that was then scheduled for just another couple weeks out. The whole thing for me was just a couple weeks from diagnosis to waking up in the ICU.

Once I got back into the swing of being active as recovery progressed, I found myself less fatigued or winded during certain activities than I would have otherwise. I'm now walking five or more miles a day, and I just bought a nice road bike and plan to start putting miles on that. My energy levels continue to rise, both due to the now 100% functional valve and the lifestyle changes it inspired. While my heart function is still diminished due to the stress put on it by the failing valve, my resting heart rate and blood pressure are both right where they need to be and remain there.

There are still lots of things to get used to, lingering sternum pain being one of them. But I was impressed and pleasantly surprised with how quickly my body bounced back actually into better shape than it has been in many years. Basically, I think as the initial trauma of the surgery recedes in your rearview, you're going to be amazed at how much better your body functions in ways you might not have even realized it was deficient.

It's reasonable to be scared, but once you're on the other side, I have a feeling you're going to really enjoy the journey.
 

Freebird

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 27, 2019
Messages
127
I'm sure a lot of the folks on the forums here will agree with me on these points. My aortic valve regurgitation was discovered in a routine end-of-year checkup by my primary care physician, who immediately sent me down the hall for an EKG. Within a week there were ultrasounds, CT scans, an angiogram, and trans-esophageal echocardiogram. So in the space of about a week, we went from everything being normal to "You need open heart surgery as soon as possible." And that was then scheduled for just another couple weeks out. The whole thing for me was just a couple weeks from diagnosis to waking up in the ICU.

Once I got back into the swing of being active as recovery progressed, I found myself less fatigued or winded during certain activities than I would have otherwise. I'm now walking five or more miles a day, and I just bought a nice road bike and plan to start putting miles on that. My energy levels continue to rise, both due to the now 100% functional valve and the lifestyle changes it inspired. While my heart function is still diminished due to the stress put on it by the failing valve, my resting heart rate and blood pressure are both right where they need to be and remain there.

There are still lots of things to get used to, lingering sternum pain being one of them. But I was impressed and pleasantly surprised with how quickly my body bounced back actually into better shape than it has been in many years. Basically, I think as the initial trauma of the surgery recedes in your rearview, you're going to be amazed at how much better your body functions in ways you might not have even realized it was deficient.

It's reasonable to be scared, but once you're on the other side, I have a feeling you're going to really enjoy the journey.
Such great insight. I've been in the waiting room for almost two years now and I'm just ready to get all this behind me. I work out every day so I'm hoping that will improve my recovery. But I love your comment about enjoying the journey that's ahead of me on the other side of this. Thank you!
 

stephenismycopilot

Active member
Joined
Jan 15, 2020
Messages
28
Location
Los Angeles, California
Such great insight. I've been in the waiting room for almost two years now and I'm just ready to get all this behind me. I work out every day so I'm hoping that will improve my recovery. But I love your comment about enjoying the journey that's ahead of me on the other side of this. Thank you!
You're gonna be great! Especially if you're already active and fit. During my time in ICU, I began asking to walk extra laps. I walked out of the hospital five days after surgery the same door I walked in, and began adding distance every day. Bottom line is that your heart is going to be so much happier once it's kicking out all the oxygenated blood your body needs, you'll have to force yourself not to overdue it! Keep us updated. This forum is a great way for all of us with similar experiences to share what we learn along the way.
 

bizinsider

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 27, 2016
Messages
85
Location
San Diego, CA
For my surgery nearly 5 months ago I received the CE Perimount 2700. The interesting part - my surgeon was Lars Svensson at the CC, whom I believe was leading the trials for the Resillia (see the original poster.) I was 67 (now 68) when it was replaced. I specifically asked about the Resillia and they were pretty adamant about his choice FOR ME. I stress for ME. I also had a bent all procedure (root) and ascending aorta repair. I was told it will last from 8-15 years, if all goes well. (Or as Dr. Svensson said, 100k miles.) My valve was then sized so a TAVR could handle the replacement, assuming I outlive the valve! 🤪😬🤷🏼‍♂️
 

BillDaThrill

Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2016
Messages
7
Location
Los Alamos, NM 87544
For my surgery nearly 5 months ago I received the CE Perimount 2700. The interesting part - my surgeon was Lars Svensson at the CC, whom I believe was leading the trials for the Resillia (see the original poster.) I was 67 (now 68) when it was replaced. I specifically asked about the Resillia and they were pretty adamant about his choice FOR ME. I stress for ME. I also had a bent all procedure (root) and ascending aorta repair. I was told it will last from 8-15 years, if all goes well. (Or as Dr. Svensson said, 100k miles.) My valve was then sized so a TAVR could handle the replacement, assuming I outlive the valve! 🤪😬🤷🏼‍♂️
That's a really interesting story. When you say "FOR ME" do you think that was mostly due to your age - or was there other factors. I think the selection of the Perimount and future TAVR is solid, but - as you note - interesting that Dr. Svensson did not push the Inspiris valve.
 

nobog

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 14, 2019
Messages
94
My valve was then sized so a TAVR could handle the replacement,

They always put the biggest size valve they can wedge in there - that was just a line to make you feel good.
 

bizinsider

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 27, 2016
Messages
85
Location
San Diego, CA
That's a really interesting story. When you say "FOR ME" do you think that was mostly due to your age - or was there other factors. I think the selection of the Perimount and future TAVR is solid, but - as you note - interesting that Dr. Svensson did not push the Inspiris valve.
I think it was age. I did a good deal of research and it seemed that they were starting to skew it toward younger patients. But it also might have been the type of procedure I had rather than JUST a valve. Whatever Dr. S says, I do. He is not one to question. (And by that I mean when it comes to HIS choice for what he's doing - he's the surgeon. I did question all sorts of things, including his choice of full sternotomy vs mini, etc and he patiently and kindly answered all questions with solid explanations. I think you should feel comfortable asking your surgeon anything. )
 

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