Australian (joint) development

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pellicle

Professional Dingbat
Joined
Nov 4, 2012
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Queensland, OzTrayLeeYa
Hi
I'm not sure if this is the same one that's been mentioned here before but I thought this was interesting
https://www.manmonthly.com.au/news/australian-research-develops-first-polymer-heart-valve/

A polymer heart valve, designed in Australia, has been successful implanted in a patient, for a world first.

The joint project between CSIRO and medical device manufacturer Foldax created the Tria heart valve.

The valve uses a proprietary CSIRO polymer which could pump blood for decades without calcification, risk of clotting, or damage to red blood cells.

Designed by CSIRO in Australia, the polymer valve acts against aortic valve disease, which occurs when the main pumping chamber of the heart and the body’s main artery stop functioning properly.

The polymer which CSIRO designed, named LifePolymer, is a biopolymer manufactured to be used in critical surgical procedures.

Post Script: I see that this is the same research as mentioned on this thread
 
Last edited:

Astro

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Aug 26, 2019
Messages
47
Location
Adelaide, Australia
The marketing sounds great. I could find only limited information online about it. It is a new “biopolymer“, the valve is called a “Tria heart valve”, and company producing it is Foldax. They plan to produce versions for open heart surgery and TAVI.

I could find no animal or lab studies in the literature about it. Foldax press statements do not include any mention of any such studies. However, it gained ethics approval for a human trial in two American hospitals. Therefore, animal/lab studies are likely to exist and presumably went well (my search may have failed to find it because the studies didn’t use the current terminology). If anyone from Foldax watches these forums, would you mind giving us some details?

I wish them well but it will take a few years before we get ‘early’ data and many years before we get ‘long’ term data. The literature has nasty examples of people who agreed to heart valve trials and unfortunately the results were not good. Therefore, a cautious approach is wise.
 

Keithl

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Joined
Apr 20, 2019
Messages
271
Sounds impressive, would be curious how this goes, could be a major game changer.
 
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