anybody else react badly to anesthesia?

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Chris

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I'm about to have a second SAVR and was wondering if anyone knew of any way to mitigate the reaction to anesthesia that I, and I imagine some others (fellow gingers), have. It always seems to make me sick (extreme nausea, to put it lightly). I remember the first time. I was seven or eight years old and had 'tubes' put in my ears (mid to late 1970s) and was sick in bed for a week.
For my first SAVR the same nausea was the hardest part of my recovery. I couldn't get out of bed for three days and I don't think I really ate/drank anything for the same period of time.
 

tom in MO

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I'm about to have a second SAVR and was wondering if anyone knew of any way to mitigate the reaction to anesthesia that I, and I imagine some others (fellow gingers), have. It always seems to make me sick (extreme nausea, to put it lightly). I remember the first time. I was seven or eight years old and had 'tubes' put in my ears (mid to late 1970s) and was sick in bed for a week.
For my first SAVR the same nausea was the hardest part of my recovery. I couldn't get out of bed for three days and I don't think I really ate/drank anything for the same period of time.
Bring it up with your surgeon who should tell your anesthesiologist. Some hospitals schedule a consult with the anesthesiologist before surgeries, I'd discuss it the anesthesiologist at that time. I have a throat anomaly which makes it difficult for the anesthesiologist to get their tubes in and I always warn them ahead of time.

Having problems with anesthesia is not rare. My mother in law was bonkers for days afterwards and I have a friend who can't take opiates, makes him a wild man and he weighs 300lbs. When you get really old (e.g. in the 90s) the biggest risk of some operations is the anesthesia.
 

Chris

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Bring it up with your surgeon who should tell your anesthesiologist. Some hospitals schedule a consult with the anesthesiologist before surgeries, I'd discuss it the anesthesiologist at that time. I have a throat anomaly which makes it difficult for the anesthesiologist to get their tubes in and I always warn them ahead of time.

Having problems with anesthesia is not rare. My mother in law was bonkers for days afterwards and I have a friend who can't take opiates, makes him a wild man and he weighs 300lbs. When you get really old (e.g. in the 90s) the biggest risk of some operations is the anesthesia.

Thanks Tom. I will see about talking with the anesthesiologist prior to the big day.
 

pellicle

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It always seems to make me sick (extreme nausea, to put it lightly). I remember the first time. I was seven or eight years old and had 'tubes' put in my ears (mid to late 1970s) and was sick in bed for a week.
I'm not entirely sure if you've had more OHS since the late 70's but my last two didn't give me that problem (but that's not to say you don't get it).

The surgery and post surgical experience has changed remarkably over the years.
 

Chris

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I'm not entirely sure if you've had more OHS since the late 70's but my last two didn't give me that problem (but that's not to say you don't get it).

The surgery and post surgical experience has changed remarkably over the years.
Just the one OHS in 2010. The earlier experience was for the ear tubes. They are probably my only two experiences with being put under anesthesia, but they both sucked. :)
 

pellicle

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Just the one OHS in 2010. The earlier experience was for the ear tubes.
ahh, I was a bit confused by the wording and wondered what ear tubes had to do with OHS and thought it was a potential keyboard autoincorrect issue and you were talking about the drain tubes we have after OHS.

So given it was 2010 I doubt things have changed much till then. I'm glad I don't get any physical symptoms from the GA (just the highly disturbing nightmares).

I hope it goes better next OHS.

:)
 

Keithl

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I just had OHS 3 weeks ago and I don’t react well either. Not as bad as you, but I was nauseous to the point I could not open my eyes or turn my head for hours. The pain meds made it worse. They did give me some sort of patch behind my ear that helps with the nausea. The first 12 hours were horrendous, I threw up 3 times, not a good feeling with e cracked chest. I feel for you as honestly recovering was not bad other than the first day dealing with anesthesia.
 

Chris

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I just had OHS 3 weeks ago and I don’t react well either. Not as bad as you, but I was nauseous to the point I could not open my eyes or turn my head for hours. The pain meds made it worse. They did give me some sort of patch behind my ear that helps with the nausea. The first 12 hours were horrendous, I threw up 3 times, not a good feeling with e cracked chest. I feel for you as honestly recovering was not bad other than the first day dealing with anesthesia.
I'm going to try to talk to the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery. The recovery from that stuff was by far the worst part of the whole thing.
 

JaneF

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Chris I never deal well with anesthesia or opiate pain medication after 2 back surgeries and OHS since 2013. I was horrendously nauseas and all they could do was give me shots of phenergan while in the hospital and send me home with phenergan or zofran.

It might not completely eliminate it, but it sure helped me.

Good luck!
 

Keithl

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I'm going to try to talk to the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery. The recovery from that stuff was by far the worst part of the whole thing.
I wish I could remember the name of the patch they gave me, but it did seem to help. It was not a miracle fix, but did seem to ease some of the nausea.
 

Asystole

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May 16, 2019
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I've been under general anesthesia many times and for the first few times I had post anesthesia nausea. They gave me all the typical pre and post-op nausea meds with nothing working. Facing an upcoming surgery and not wanting to vomit post-op again, I did some research and found out that placing a nasogastric tube pre-op would help with the post-op nausea. I told my doctor that the nausea meds were not effective on me and I read about the NG tube and he agreed to use it and it worked great. I would keep the NG tube in for a few hours after I was completely awake and I've had no post-op nausea events.

I've used it four times now and If I need general anesthesia in the future, I'll be sure to ask for the tube again.
 

carolinemc

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Chris, my mother had the same problem. You are great in coming in here and getting the greatest advice. You do what you have to be safe. Good luck on your surgery.
 


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