73 And Scared

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d333gs

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Feb 20, 2018
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162
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France
Re LA Air - probably improved, but it's also winter so no smog to bump up against the hills. This day was very foggy early, and lifting when we were up higher.

70 is the new 58!

Cheers.
70 years old, could just be a vital deception/ perception as we approach the milestone. There certainly is a difference between my present sense being at near 70 and the persistent image of a cane in hand 70 year old man stamped into my mind at some point in my youth.when did holding a cane transition into riding a mountain bike?
 

pellicle

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Nov 4, 2012
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Queensland, OzTrayLeeYa
when did holding a cane transition into riding a mountain bike?
well I can say when I hurt my sacra-ilia joint last year it transitioned from riding a MTB to using crutches then a cane. Now I'm back to just gentle rides.

There are a lucky few who make it to 90 and feel as they did at 50. I used to get passed by them on the ski track in winter XC training. They are rare and if you've ever worked in and around aged care you know they aren't the majority. I know I won't be one of them.
 

Chuck C

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Dec 5, 2020
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Two weeks away from two years and hiked UP to the Hollywood sign yesterday. From here...View attachment 888421

To here..

View attachment 888422
(That's the sign in the background.) Very easy/peasy. Turning 70 in a few months.
Well done Herb!!

I think that you're ready to join me and Dennis going up Mt. Monserate! :)

BTW, it sounds like we came close to crossing paths yesterday. I took my youngest daughter to LA for the weekend, with a list of things that she wanted to do. Visit Universal Studios was on the list, as well as hike to the Hollywood sign. We went to Universal on Sunday. Yesterday we planned to hike to the Hollywood sign, but she changed her mind and wanted to head straight home instead, as she had a homework assignment due today and was getting concerned that she would be up late working on it.

Keep up the good work and the positive outlook!
 

Superbob

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Hello Movieman and welcome to the forum! Superman referred me to your post asking if other seniors had gone through OHS. Oh yes, sometimes with repeat jaunts to the OR over a period of years. I turned 80 last November, and have had two major sternum cracking surgeries -- the first when I was 63 (replacement of aortic root and valve, a Bentall's, sounds similar to what you face), and then a second when I was 78 after a fast-growing aneurysm was detected. Actually, I had a third last June that seemed heart-related -- it was to repair a ventral incisional hernia that appeared a few months after my 2019 OHS -- a not uncommon glitch for seniors who have had multiple surgeries, but perhaps scarier than routine hernia operations because of the closeness to the aortic region. Anyway, all went well, and I have continued an active life. Love to talk long walks and even do some planking in exercise class.

If you are nervous, that only means you are human, I was my most jittery before OHS1, which forced me to come to terms with my mortality. Had to take some sleep medicine to calm my nerves in months before the surgery. In OH2, I went into the OR joking with everyone, lots of laughter, and when I came out the next day my wry-humored surgeon pronounced me the "Poster Boy for Aortic Aneurysm Surgery." Had cute UNC nurses who lined up for turns to walk with me in the hallways. By then I had an advanced sense of humor, I reckon.

Anyway, certainly plan carefully for your surgery, get everything in order, find the best surgeon and hospital you can, and rest assured that many seniors have been through all this and gratefully lived active lives. If you would like to talk further, I would be glad to do so. A long-time Richmonder, I was living in Northern Virginia when I had OHS1 at Inova Fairfax Hospital with Dr. Alan Speir, a truly great surgeon.
 

d333gs

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Joined
Feb 20, 2018
Messages
162
Location
France
Hello Movieman and welcome to the forum! Superman referred me to your post asking if other seniors had gone through OHS. Oh yes, sometimes with repeat jaunts to the OR over a period of years. I turned 80 last November, and have had two major sternum cracking surgeries -- the first when I was 63 (replacement of aortic root and valve, a Bentall's, sounds similar to what you face), and then a second when I was 78 after a fast-growing aneurysm was detected. Actually, I had a third last June that seemed heart-related -- it was to repair a ventral incisional hernia that appeared a few months after my 2019 OHS -- a not uncommon glitch for seniors who have had multiple surgeries, but perhaps scarier than routine hernia operations because of the closeness to the aortic region. Anyway, all went well, and I have continued an active life. Love to talk long walks and even do some planking in exercise class.

If you are nervous, that only means you are human, I was my most jittery before OHS1, which forced me to come to terms with my mortality. Had to take some sleep medicine to calm my nerves in months before the surgery. In OH2, I went into the OR joking with everyone, lots of laughter, and when I came out the next day my wry-humored surgeon pronounced me the "Poster Boy for Aortic Aneurysm Surgery." Had cute UNC nurses who lined up for turns to walk with me in the hallways. By then I had an advanced sense of humor, I reckon.

Anyway, certainly plan carefully for your surgery, get everything in order, find the best surgeon and hospital you can, and rest assured that many seniors have been through all this and gratefully lived active lives. If you would like to talk further, I would be glad to do so. A long-time Richmonder, I was living in Northern Virginia when I had OHS1 at Inova Fairfax Hospital with Dr. Alan Speir, a truly great surgeon.
Wow! Did you have the sternum opened each time?
 

Superbob

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I think its safe to assume for anyone here that if they had heart surgery it was by sternotomy each time (like 3 in my case too)
Yep, what Pellicle said. Especially if there is heavy duty work to do with enlarged root/aneurysm. There's no way around it. I don't find the scar a detriment. Chicks dig scars, even in 80-year-old gents
 

d333gs

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Feb 20, 2018
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Yep, what Pellicle said. Especially if there is heavy duty work to do with enlarged root/aneurysm. There's no way around it. I don't find the scar a detriment. Chicks dig scars, even in 80-year-old gents
LOL!!!
 

bizinsider

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Jun 27, 2016
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San Diego, CA
Well done Herb!!

I think that you're ready to join me and Dennis going up Mt. Monserate! :)

BTW, it sounds like we came close to crossing paths yesterday. I took my youngest daughter to LA for the weekend, with a list of things that she wanted to do. Visit Universal Studios was on the list, as well as hike to the Hollywood sign. We went to Universal on Sunday. Yesterday we planned to hike to the Hollywood sign, but she changed her mind and wanted to head straight home instead, as she had a homework assignment due today and was getting concerned that she would be up late working on it.

Keep up the good work and the positive outlook!
One of these days, if I every stop being so busy, definitely. And on the Hollywood sign, we have a special way to do it. My wife is writing about it in her travel blog. Hit me up and I'll send you the link once it's published. There's a not-so-secret but yet less-known way that'll take no more than 2 hours round trip.
 

zoemeigs

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Feb 27, 2022
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Location
Fort Worth
I've been reading these pots for a while and now my time is here. 73 and scheduled for aortic root and valve replacement, plus a bypass, at the end of next month. My symptoms of fatigue/weakness, rapid pulse, chest discomfort, etc. are more frequent and severe. I've been to the ER several times over the past couple years with what turn out to be false alarms ... now that a date is set, I worry that I won't last long enough.

Most posts I've read seem to be from people much younger than I am ... any advice from other senior citizens that have been down this road?
I am new on this forum.
one thing no one warned me about before my open heart surgery was the hallucinating and confusion I would experience for the first few days after surgery. I think it’s caused by the anesthesia. Anyway, I hope you’re spared this side effect but if not, being aware that you may see and hear things that are not real may help you to deal with hallucinations. It was more than worrisome for me. Maybe others on the forum can provide more insight on this phenomenon.
I hope your surgery goes well and your recovery is smooth.
 

d333gs

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Feb 20, 2018
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162
Location
France
I am new on this forum.
one thing no one warned me about before my open heart surgery was the hallucinating and confusion I would experience for the first few days after surgery. I think it’s caused by the anesthesia. Anyway, I hope you’re spared this side effect but if not, being aware that you may see and hear things that are not real may help you to deal with hallucinations. It was more than worrisome for me. Maybe others on the forum can provide more insight on this phenomenon.
I hope your surgery goes well and your recovery is smooth.
Wow, what kind of pain meds did they give you?
 

Justmadi

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Apr 1, 2016
Messages
33
Location
Wisconsin
I had that the two days after surgery. In my case it was the pain killer used…Norco. Thank goodness my sister was there and said to get me off of it. I was vey paranoid - thought nurses were talking about me, not telling me things, etc. It’s in my records now that I NEVER take that again.(to this day I still think they were talking about me..the hallucinations were that strong)
 

d333gs

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Feb 20, 2018
Messages
162
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France
Narco info:
Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these symptoms or those listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING or SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS sections, call your doctor immediately or get emergency medical treatment:
  • chest pain
  • agitation, hallucinations (seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist),......"

"Hydrocodone: MedlinePlus Drug Information
 

carolinemc

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May 31, 2010
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Location
kansas city, mo
I am new on this forum.
one thing no one warned me about before my open heart surgery was the hallucinating and confusion I would experience for the first few days after surgery. I think it’s caused by the anesthesia. Anyway, I hope you’re spared this side effect but if not, being aware that you may see and hear things that are not real may help you to deal with hallucinations. It was more than worrisome for me. Maybe others on the forum can provide more insight on this phenomenon.
I hope your surgery goes well and your recovery is smooth.
I was spared, but the ICU people hours after surgery while I still had the breathing machine on me. I banged on the railing three different times and they had to tell me to go back to sleep. I made a lot of noise.
 

tom in MO

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Joined
Jan 17, 2012
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1,863
Location
MO USA
The anesthesia they give for OHS is a real cocktail of various drugs at various times. I asked about the pharmacology when they were knocking me out. I know it contained fentanyl for my surgery.
 

movieman

Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2019
Messages
5
Location
Williamsburg, Virginia
The anesthesia they give for OHS is a real cocktail of various drugs at various times. I asked about the pharmacology when they were knocking me out. I know it contained fentanyl for my surgery.
On those occasions of surgery or procedures that I've had, I never fail to ask the crew if they've seen "Coma" from 1978 ... always gets a few remarks!
 

d333gs

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Joined
Feb 20, 2018
Messages
162
Location
France
Congrats! Where did you have it done?
Thanks DT!
In France; Marseille, la Timone, a huge university Hosptial surgery done by DR COLLART . I was very impressed with every aspect of my 5 days there. I am home now (Three days) after three weeks of great rehab and I am keeping up the exercise routines. The sternum gets a bit sensitive after long walks but the new AV is working great!
 

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