On-X Aortic Heart Valves: Safer with Less Warfarin

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TEE on May 2

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  • TEE on May 2

    Yesterday,I had my follow up to my ECHO.My cardiologist thinks he saw leakage in my
    aortic Valve,but because my mechanical valve is shadowing it,I need a TEE done.
    it will be on my one year anniversary of MVR.Has anyone had this procedure done and can you really feel it go down?I know your partially sedated but still..any have this procedure.

  • #2
    What is a TEE.

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    • #3
      It's where they put a small camera down your throats to see your heart and how it's working.

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      • #4
        I had to verify that my AV stenosis was severe. I was concerned because I have a terrible gag reflex and sure enough I resisted a bit but the staff got me to relax and I was fine. Good luck~
        BAV, severe aortic stenosis replaced and single bypass done 9/30/15 by Dr. Joseph Coselli, CHI St. Luke's Hospital, Houston. Clinical trial Edwards Rapid Deployment Intuity (tissue) Valve. Cardiologist is Dr. Jose Diez, Baylor Clinic.
        Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible.
        Dalai Lama

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        • #5
          I had a TEE done before my MVR to confirm the extent and seriousness of the regurgitation which was not clear from the ECHO. It was not a big deal but it felt pretty weird, especially when they told me to swallow when they were pulling it out (was very counter intuitive). There was no pain although I have heard that others who are sedated for the procedure end up with a sore throat afterwards.
          Endocarditis and mechanical MVR, September 2011

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          • #6
            Trina, I had a TEE just a short while after my AVR. They thought I could have had endocarditis, so they wanted a better view. No endocarditis, but definitely an unusual experience in the test. They lightly sedated me, so I was awake but really didn't care what was going on. Then they liberally swabbed the back of my throat with numbing gook (lidocaine?) which tasted nasty. . . until it shut off my sense of taste completely. The test itself was interesting to watch, but I really didn't register much of anything. Afterward I had just a bit of a sore throat. Since I was still in the hospital at the time, nobody cared if it took a while for the sedation to wear off. If you are outpatient, you may need someone to drive you home.

            I wouldn't worry about the TEE. It is really pretty easy on the patient, and the docs get a much clearer view of the heart for planning and diagnostic purposes.
            Go Class of 2011!

            Steve Epstein
            9 Years in The Waiting Room, then on February 28, 2011,
            AVR with 23mm Edwards Bovine Pericardial Tissue Valve, Model 3300TFX, Pacemaker - Boston Scientific Altrua 60 DDDR IS-1 and CABG (LIMA-LAD) at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago by Dr. Patrick McCarthy and the most wonderful team of professionals I could ask for. New pacemaker (Boston Scientific L101) and ventricular lead, July, 2016.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by epstns View Post
              Trina, I had a TEE just a short while after my AVR. They thought I could have had endocarditis, so they wanted a better view.
              Wow, that must've been scary.

              Bicuspid Aortic Valve. Moderate Aortic Valve Stenosis. Ascending Aorta: 4.1cm
              In the waiting room.

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              • #8
                I've had two. The first one I don't even remember, maybe they sedated me right away? Second one, they tried to get me to swallow the thing, I gagged so bad from the throat numbing stuff that they just said screw it and sedated me. No discomfort or aftereffects after that.
                Mitral stenosis from rheumatic fever, corrected 2002 via valvuloplasty, now have mitral regurgitation, in the waiting room for mitral valve replacement

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                • #9
                  So sorry to hear this Trina..The TEE is nowt to worry about..Like dornole I had 2 too but without sedation. I rode a bike to the hospital couple weeks ago to do it but they sternly informed me I was not to ride it back..(a scooter/mo bike).Sending you lots of good wishes for a positive reading with the leakage..Hope it's manageable.. Love x

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                  • #10
                    Agian - In the first few weeks following my AVR, almost everything was scary. I think I hit every speed bump and pothole in the road to recovery. I had pleural effusion, fluid retention, heart rhythm issues to beat the band, and near-complete digestive system shut down. I wasn't strong enough to start cardiac rehab until I was 12 weeks out. I just chose to soldier on through it all, though, as I had no choice.

                    Fast forward 6 years. I still have random digestive issues, some from back then, some from side effects of other treatments I've had since. I am on pacemaker #2, with one of my leads replaced already. But my valve and arteries, as of last summer, were "as seen at last evaluation in March, 2011. I'm a happy camper. I now 69 years of age, still work 50+ hours a week, hit the gym 5 days a week, travel, do lots of other recreational activities. . . in short, life is good. A little bit of a scare isn't going to slow me down.

                    My message to everyone here? You are ALL far stronger than you give yourselves credit for. Whatever you need to do or get through, there is someone here who has been there. We are here to help.
                    Go Class of 2011!

                    Steve Epstein
                    9 Years in The Waiting Room, then on February 28, 2011,
                    AVR with 23mm Edwards Bovine Pericardial Tissue Valve, Model 3300TFX, Pacemaker - Boston Scientific Altrua 60 DDDR IS-1 and CABG (LIMA-LAD) at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago by Dr. Patrick McCarthy and the most wonderful team of professionals I could ask for. New pacemaker (Boston Scientific L101) and ventricular lead, July, 2016.

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                    • #11
                      I had a TEE and it sounds like my experience was worse than some of the ones above. I don't want to scare you but ask for lots of drugs. I felt far too awake and aware of what was going on the entire time. I'll spare you the details of the experience unless you would like them. For me, I think part of what made it so bad is that I was TERRIFIED and TENSE the entire time. Being tense in your neck/throats makes it much worse in sure! So my best advice is to relax, and you will make it through!

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                      • #12
                        I had a TEE and it sounds like my experience was worse than some of the ones above. I don't want to scare you but ask for lots of drugs. I felt far too awake and aware of what was going on the entire time. I'll spare you the details of the experience unless you would like them. For me, I think part of what made it so bad is that I was TERRIFIED and TENSE the entire time. Being tense in your neck/throats makes it much worse in sure! So my best advice is to relax, and you will make it through!

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                        • #13
                          Trina, I've had a TEE and the worst part about it for me was the lidocaine being sprayed into the back of my throat. It tasted like bug spray smells, if you can imagine that! And they put me into a twilight for the procedure. I just remember being very relaxed and telling someone that I wanted a chicken quesadilla.

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