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How long do Dacron grafts last?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Bryan B View Post
    Ross,

    I was not trying to dispute you or Dr. McCarthy. I was actually trying to find a link that corroborated that the actual dacron sleeve will last longer than the patient so I could post it here. I couldn't find one (not that there isn't one out there) but I did find this brief synopsis about a dacron sleeve that developed multiple "non-anastomotic aneurysms in a bifurcated double velour knitted Dacron aorto-bifemoral graft". Unfortunately the website required that you to pay for a subscription to read the entire article about this case. That's why I said I'm sure it's very rare...about as rare as a mechanical valve company producing a faulty valve that fails.
    Not a problem Bryan. I'm merely interjecting what I was told and by whom, that's all. I've searched on the issue before and never even found that, so thanks for posting it.

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    • #17
      I am posting on this thread after long time of inactivity , but would like to know what is the observation of all members on durability of graft. I am 32 and Cardiologist of Cleveland clinic said to me after this surgery i should be lucky to live an more days after 20 years

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      • #18
        Originally posted by dixitworld View Post
        I am posting on this thread after long time of inactivity , but would like to know what is the observation of all members on durability of graft. I am 32 and Cardiologist of Cleveland clinic said to me after this surgery i should be lucky to live an more days after 20 years
        currently about 9 months into use a onyx with root graft, and additional tube into the arch. At three month followup, surgeon said that about 5% of patients need some rework due to fatigue of sutures (connecting grafts, and connecting graft to native tissue). This was around conversation around resuming pushups, where he said not to, with associated elevated bp stressing sutures. My engineering self then started thinking of stress concentration and fatigue characteristics in warm, moist environments... not cool...

        anyway, if there were better ways, they would be implemented. present approaches has been used (with incremental improvements) for some decades. Below is link to article from 1964 on the topic.
        https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jam...bstract/562897

        If not for modern cardiac treatments, i would have been first dead more than two decades ago, I am now on third life, and just at 40 years of age. Some have but a single try, others get temporary reprieve(s). Take each day as it comes, and try to use them wisely...

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        • #19
          Hi

          wow ... talk about dig up a zombie thread ...
          Originally posted by dixitworld View Post
          I am posting on this thread after long time of inactivity
          so, is the "the research" you were mentioning in your earlier post? You just found these posts in this thread?

          Interestingly this thread (from 2009) has posts from 2 of the most respectable (IMO) posters this forum has. Al Capshaw and Ross. They are both highly informed and educated people who research with veracity that which was written with veracity.

          So lets start with the first one potsted by DDT77 above

          https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jam...bstract/562897

          written in 1964 I'm not even sure that any of the materials it discusses would be in manufacture today, its nothing more than a historical vignette in todays analysis. I'm sure that (like all manufacturing) the findings and results of stuff done nearly 50 years ago would long ago have been woven into the iterative cycle of development which occurs (study Toyota for instance).

          Next the more recent article which is filled with words that I had to look up
          https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...4.2002.00147.x

          its dated from 2008, so as a historian its only ten years out of date, and again I'd venture that in the intervening 10 years that incident was studied ad nauseam ... publications tend to be written about the exceptions worthy of study (not the general issues, unless one is writing on how they've discovered how to fix them) The article says:
          The cause of non-anastomotic graft aneurysms is most likely due to a basic structural failure in the graft, as a result of defects in fabrication, Dacron fibre deterioration or a combination of both
          so its conjectural at that point, and I'd suspect a batch issue or a manufacture issue ... uncommon. It goes on to simply discuss repair options.

          you say:
          , but would like to know what is the observation of all members on durability of graft. I am 32 and Cardiologist of Cleveland clinic said to me after this surgery i should be lucky to live an more days after 20 years
          without knowing anything more about your health situation that sort of statement is an indicator that the guy is an arrogant AR5EHOLE. I can understand dick0236 being told that his (at that time relatively untested experimental) valve may not last his life (although he's recently had his 51st anniversary ON THAT EXACT VALVE), but not anyone modern saying stuff like that.

          I propose that dickhead has put the willies up you and to be frank I'd see someone else.

          Its true we just don't know how long we get ... heck I know people who died of cancer in their 30's who if interviewed in their 20's wouldn't have expected that in their futures, so unknowns are always there. But to attempt to be GodLike and predict that I'd really want to know what else is wrong with you to give him such certainty (and even then it would be statistical).

          So bottom line (in my vew) is ... you're probably going to be just fine.

          Best Wishes

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          • #20
            Lifetime guarantee, baby! Thatís what Iím banking on!
            10/15/2009 - St. Jude Medical Valve / Conduit Graft 25mm. Dr. Robert Hooker Jr at Meijer Heart Center, Spectrum Health Butterworth Hospital, Grand Rapids, MI.

            September 2009 - diagnosed with 4.9 cm ascending aorta with two aneurysm bulges.

            11/21/1990 - St. Jude Medical Valve 23A-101. Dr. Seong Chi at Ingham Regional Medical Center, Lansing, MI.

            Aortic Stenosis and BAV diagnosed in infancy.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Superman View Post
              Lifetime guarantee, baby! Thatís what Iím banking on!
              Yep, but better than tail light guarantee ... ;)

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              • #22
                I have a st Jude aortic valve conduit (valve with graft). I was told it will last my lifetime. I was 42, and that was three years ago.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by DachsieMom View Post
                  I have a st Jude aortic valve conduit (valve with graft). I was told it will last my lifetime. I was 42, and that was three years ago.
                  In the event of catastrophic failure, arenít they still right?

                  10/15/2009 - St. Jude Medical Valve / Conduit Graft 25mm. Dr. Robert Hooker Jr at Meijer Heart Center, Spectrum Health Butterworth Hospital, Grand Rapids, MI.

                  September 2009 - diagnosed with 4.9 cm ascending aorta with two aneurysm bulges.

                  11/21/1990 - St. Jude Medical Valve 23A-101. Dr. Seong Chi at Ingham Regional Medical Center, Lansing, MI.

                  Aortic Stenosis and BAV diagnosed in infancy.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by dixitworld View Post
                    ........... would like to know what is the observation of all members on durability of graft. I am 32 and Cardiologist of Cleveland clinic said to me after this surgery i should be lucky to live an more days after 20 years
                    Doctors, like most of us, sometimes "put their mouths in motion before they put their brains in gear". Here are a few of my own observations over the years.

                    1. On my first visit to a cardio after my surgery in 1967 he had every cardio in the office listen to the valve as they had never heard one in operation.....that didn't do much for my confidence in having the surgery at 31.

                    2. Cardio, about 12-13 years post surgery told me I was his "longest lived valve surgery patient"......not comforting to a young man in early 40s. He left medicine a few years later and opened a religious book store.

                    3. Very young new cardio told me on separate visits +/- ten years ago......."I was a medical miracle" and "boy, you've been lucky". Fortunately, by the time of my visits to him, I had become used to dumb statements by physicians....so it didn't bother me.....too much.

                    My current cardio.....he is about 60 and has been around for awhile, although he was only about 10 when I had OHS, says "there is no way to know how long my valve might last".

                    I am now at the age that going to funerals is becoming a routine activity in my life........and none of them are for me...........YET......
                    Last edited by dick0236; September 8th, 2018, 12:03 PM.
                    Starr-Edwards mechanical AVR 1967 at age 31.....University of Kentucky Med. Ctr., Drs. Richard Wood & Gordon Danielson surgeons. No surgery (heart or otherwise) since. On Warfarin ACT since surgery with no diet, lifestyle, or activity restrictions....and I live one day at a time.

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                    • #25
                      Dick
                      when I read this
                      Originally posted by dick0236 View Post
                      I am now at the age that going to funerals is becoming a routine activity in my life........and none of them are for me...........YET......
                      my usual glib and flippant self instantly thought
                      "Always the Brides Maid never the Bride" ... as is often suggested don't rush into it.

                      Myself I'm totally ok with when mine is ... I'm going to stand them all up at the altar and not go myself.

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                      • #26
                        The way my surgeon put it was like this: If they dig me up a thousand years from now, they'll find my bones, my valve and the dacron tube. He also told me that over time the graft becomes part of you, overgrown with the same cells that line your natural arteries.

                        Who knows what will happen? Enjoy life now... Now if only I would take my own advice.
                        Surgery date: Nov 5, 2013. (Guy Fawkes Day!)
                        AVR with Epic tissue valve; Repair 5.3cm aneurysm in proximal arch with Dacron graft.
                        Status: still alive, life back to normal.

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