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Duff Man
May 20th, 2008, 07:45 PM
I told my cardiologist that I'm having frequent chest pain and he said that I could have a Treadmill Stress Test done. I asked about the chemical stress test where you don't have to get your heart rate and BP high, but he scoffed at that idea. This guy has me all figured out I guess. So I have it scheduled for tomorrow, but I have reservations because of my aneurysm.

What do you guys think about having a "small" aneurysm and basically pushing it to the maximum on a treadmill?

Arlyss
May 20th, 2008, 08:11 PM
Increased stress on the weakened wall of an aneurysmal aorta due to elevated blood pressure is a potential cause of aortic dissection.

I am not aware of any statistics being reported re. dissection related to stress tests but am aware that it has occurred.

No one can guarantee that the increased pressure on the wall of the aorta will not cause it to tear immediately or set it up for a future emergency.

Another example is heavy lifting. I know of individuals that had lifted something heavy in the days prior to their aortic dissection, presumably putting stress on the aortic wall - they did not know they had a BAV/anuerysm.

In 2001, my husband had a chemical stress test to evaluate his coronary arteries. In 2006, the 64 slice CT Angio had come on the scene and was used prior to his surgery. In both cases, his coronary arteries were clear, which is typical for those with BAV.

When there is chest pain and an aneurysm is known to exist, regardless of size, it should be taken seriously and handled gently. Strict blood pressure control comes into play in evaluating the symptoms, and an aortic specialist would carefully assess whether the aorta is unstable and may require intervention. If an aorta is symptomatic, it is agreed that it should be dealt with regardless of size.

All of this is documented in the medical literature. It is important to find someone who understands this to care for those with bavd.

Best wishes,
Arlyss

Harrybaby666
May 20th, 2008, 08:11 PM
I told my cardiologist that I'm having frequent chest pain and he said that I could have a Treadmill Stress Test done. I asked about the chemical stress test where you don't have to get your heart rate and BP high, but he scoffed at that idea. This guy has me all figured out I guess. So I have it scheduled for tomorrow, but I have reservations because of my aneurysm.

What do you guys think about having a "small" aneurysm and basically pushing it to the maximum on a treadmill?

I have had a couple of stress tests done....one physical and the other chemical, and let me tell you....the chemical one in my case was horrible...I would rather do another physical one before I would do another chemical. I would trust that the doctors who are doing the test would stop you immediately if they thought for one second that you were in trouble. Here's wishing you nothing but the best for your test tomorrow. Harrybaby:D:D

Duff Man
May 20th, 2008, 08:21 PM
I had a chemical test done a long time ago, the worst that happened for me was just burning/flushing in my face.

Do you or did you have an aneurysm Harry?

Thanks for the info and personal experiences Arlyss. I'm not sure if I'm going to do it. You bring up very good points. I'm very "on the fence". I bet the chest pain is from my valve or aorta anyway. It seems kinda stupid to get this done for me.

ALCapshaw2
May 20th, 2008, 08:44 PM
You may want to ask your Surgeon for his opinion on having a Stress Test. Hopefully he will have a better appreciation for the Risks to a "Dilated Aorta".

My personal reaction is that I would want a Compelling Reason to go through with the Stress Test given your condition.

'AL Capshaw'

Harrybaby666
May 20th, 2008, 08:48 PM
No, I haven't had an aneurysm, although my aortic root has dialated to 3.9 and has since returned to 3.3 as of my last echo....I had a positive stress test which indicates that I do have a blockage in one of my arteries, but mainly they did the stress test to try and figure out why I have had and still do have alot of chest pain. So far they have said that some of it could be caused by my Pulmonary Hypertension.. I go for another echo on June 10th, so hopefully, this echo might help get to the bottom of things. When I had my chemical test, it felt like my chest was going to explode...the pressure, the SOB, the anxiety....and the pain was horrible. Harry:D:eek::eek::D

Arlyss
May 20th, 2008, 09:37 PM
Here is a link to an interesting paper re. aortic dissection and aortic size.


http://www.circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/116/10/1120

Best wishes,
Arlyss

lynnconnolly
May 20th, 2008, 11:58 PM
This post was quite a coincidence for me to read as just yesterday, I had a stress test and hated it. I don't have aneurysm, I have MVR and AVR, AFib and PH. I left the hospital incredibly angry.

After 5 minutes I felt awful - SOB, heart racing, my BP and pulse rate were going nuts, and I said 'I think I'll need to stop soon' and the junior doctor who was there was totally dismissive and actually laughed. She said words to the effect that I should be able to do much longer and then increased the speed and incline.

After 7 minutes I told her if she didn't stop it, I would fall off the thing. I had nasty crushing pain in my chest that was going up into my throat. They've always ignored me or been totally dismissive of my chest and back pain. My bp was up to 220/140-ish, my pulse was in triple figures. After it stopped, it took ages - as usual after exertion - for it all to calm down.

It angers me that these people who have never had this illness, can be so complacent and smug when they are busy patronising us and 'assuring' us nothing bad will happen.

I think it's analogous to saying to someone who's had a broken leg 'let's just put your leg in this vice and continue to tighten it for a while to just see how strong the bone is.'

The trouble with medical professionals is that they understand the mechanics of our diseases but they've - rarely- had anything like it themselves, so they don't have a clue how scary it is to purposely induce things that we find are distressing symptoms of impending doom. They don't know what it's like to live in fear of 'setting off' something that will lead us to hospital - again!

Good luck Aaron and don't forget that you do have the right to refuse to do it if you don't want to. I certainly will if I'm told to do one again.

Lynn

Bonzo Dog
May 21st, 2008, 01:15 AM
..................... the junior doctor who was there was totally dismissive and actually laughed. She said words to the effect that I should be able to do much longer and then increased the speed and incline.

......................

Lynn


junior doctor there lies the nub of the matter IMHO.

In my experience recently qualified cocksure young juniors are a potential liability. As docs age they become humbler and more patient friendly.



Re stress tests, they need stress to be effective. An unfortunate connundrum for some cardiac patients.

lynnconnolly
May 21st, 2008, 01:35 AM
junior doctor there lies the nub of the matter IMHO.

In my experience recently qualified cocksure young juniors are a potential liability. As docs age they become humbler and more patient friendly.



Re stress tests, they need stress to be effective. An unfortunate connundrum for some cardiac patients.

Hi Simon, yes I'm sure you're right on both counts. I know in most of my posts that I tend to be very cynical and bitter about the medical profession, but sadly, that's been my experience. And as Aaron said, some doctors 'scoff' at things we say or ask. I hate it. I really, really hate it when they won't take it seriously when told we have pain or any other thing for that matter. It seems to be the case for Aaron, if I'm reading the post right, that they aren't listening to him. I know it's the case for many of us.

I have to say, THE only doctor that I trust right now to truly have MY best interests at heart is my GP, Dr Collins. I simply do not trust any other medical professional at the moment - or at least, not those with whom I'm having regular contact anyway.

However, I don't want to hijack Aaron's post so I'll stop ranting on now :D

Bad Mad
May 21st, 2008, 02:30 AM
I told my cardiologist that I'm having frequent chest pain and he said that I could have a Treadmill Stress Test done. I asked about the chemical stress test where you don't have to get your heart rate and BP high, but he scoffed at that idea. This guy has me all figured out I guess. So I have it scheduled for tomorrow, but I have reservations because of my aneurysm.

What do you guys think about having a "small" aneurysm and basically pushing it to the maximum on a treadmill?


I had 3 different stress tests when my ascending aorta was 4.5cm in size - prior to my AVR + ascending aorta re-inforcement in December.

The object was to test how high my BP rose during peak exercise, so we could assess the risks, given the dilated aorta.

I completed 18 minutes on two of the occasions, before I was asked to stop.
If you want to try and quantify risk of something happening, then it is fair to say it is extremely low.

My feeling was that it was better to find out what my BP was doing during stressful situations.... and what safer place to do it than the hospital?

Duff Man
May 21st, 2008, 02:41 AM
Here is a link to an interesting paper re. aortic dissection and aortic size.


http://www.circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/116/10/1120

Best wishes,
Arlyss

That is VERY interesting. Makes me feel like I need the surgery done like now. Coincidentally it quotes Dr. Svensson who i'd like to be my surgeon.


Even with more aggressive guidelines (<5 cm), preemptive aneurysm surgery would fail to prevent 40% of acute aortic dissections seen in our registry.

The worst part about aneurysms is the fact that you absoutely can not know when it will happen, or if it will. One guy can make it to 8 cm, the next won't make it to 5.

Ross
May 21st, 2008, 03:20 AM
My vote is tell him to go jump in a lake. Ask him exactly what he's looking for subjecting you to stress? It better be a damn good reason otherwise, tell him to go fishing.

Superbob
May 21st, 2008, 04:43 AM
Stress tests may have their place, but in my humble opinion some medical people are too quick to use them for people with elevated risks.

To my amazement, just a few months out of OHS (Bentall's), I was told I would have to take a stress test to establish a baseline to get into cardiac rehab. I said hell no, I won't go (to the stress test) -- and I got into cardiac rehab anyway, and did well in it.

upchurch131
May 21st, 2008, 05:18 AM
I had two during the period my aneurysm was smaller. But I wasn't smart enough to know what I know now by being a part of this enlightened forum and never questioned the test. I trusted the judgement of my cardiologist. In many ways, I just didn't want to hear any more bad news, I guess.

Arlyss
May 21st, 2008, 06:24 AM
Just to emphasize the important aspects of Aaron's situation. He has an aneurysm, and he has chest pain.

There is no "rule book" of guarantees for what a diseased aorta will do. It is very arrogant for anyone to think that they can dictate to a diseased aorta. That is why I posted the link to the paper above. The idea of a "magic number" in terms of the size of the aorta is not true. The size of the aorta is a guideline for making decisions, but it is inadequate - as Aaron has noted, this paper reports a significant number of people dissect at less than 5 cm. The question for each individual is how fragile their aorta is - and it is not easy to answer.

All we have to go on are statistics - statistics that are helpful but also incomplete - that indicate generally the larger an aneurysm is, the more likely dissection or rupture. That has to be balanced by a number of things, including the risk of the surgery in the hands of the surgeon who will do it.

It might be helpful for anyone reading this to check this site and read the factors that are considered under "Timing of Elective Surgery". Size is one of several factors listed.
www.cedars-sinai.edu/aorta

The best approach I am aware of today is to have the aorta followed by someone with expertise who will monitor/control blood pressure aggressively and recognize that a "symptomatic aorta" needs surgery regardless of its size.

Those who have the privilege of choosing their surgery date rather than ending up in an emergency, may also have the privilege of putting themselves in surgical hands with very low risk. However, they will need financial resources and usually the willingness to travel some distance in order to do it.

Best wishes,
Arlyss

Duff Man
May 21st, 2008, 06:53 AM
Well, I cancelled that test. You guys might have saved my life. I don't think I need it, and i think it was a bad idea. Why tempt fate?

No show fee be damned!

Bad Mad
May 21st, 2008, 07:30 AM
That's one way of looking at it, as long as you continue with a very non-exertive lifestyle until you have your aorta fixed/repaired.

I'm not sure what you intend to do in regard to the whole exercise thing. If you intend to continue at a fairly active level, then perhaps the stress test would have given your cardio an indication of your MAX BP (or close) during exercise, which in turn would allow him to consider the best way of ensuring that your BP is lowered as to minimise any potential risks for a dissection.

As someone else pointed to, the size (4.5cm) probably isn't as significant as the fragility/strength of the tissue/aortic walls. Which I assume, is something you have no insight into unfortunately. :(

In my humble opinion, I think you may have have been scare-mongered a little here, and perhaps should have got more clarification/detail from your cardio before cancelling :)

Duff Man
May 21st, 2008, 07:36 AM
I was on the fence before I made the thread, they just made excellent points. My cardiologist doesn't mind if I continue weight training, but I don't think that's ok either. The guy is just really cavalier about what he recommends to protect the aorta.

Bad Mad
May 21st, 2008, 07:39 AM
Fair enough. If he's proposing that it's ok for you to continue WT, then it doesn't sound like he is a very informed Cardio :eek:

Arlyss
May 21st, 2008, 08:23 AM
Hi Aaron,

I am wondering what your plans are ?

I can only tell you that if I had symptoms, I would go to an aortic surgeon of my choice and review everything, including my symptoms, with him as soon as I could. I would take along a sample of daily blood pressure readings and a list of medications I am taking.

It is not good to be too sedentary - my husband walked an hour every day prior to his aneurysm surgery to keep in shape. He had been a very intense heavy weight lifter all his life - which ended when that aneurysm was found.

My husband managed to escape dissection despite doing heavy weight lifting, having very high blood pressure (we did not know....) when his aneurysm was found. He had zero symptoms in his chest - not so much as a twinge ever, before or after the diagnosis. I would think that his aortic tissue, even at 5.2 cm, was not as fragile as some others. It was a good day when that aneurysm came out!

Arlyss

Bina
May 21st, 2008, 10:06 AM
It was probably a very wise decision to cancel that stress test. I had requested a stress/treadmill echo when I was stupidly stalling my surgery. The techs had me all ready to jump on the treadmill when a Junior cardio showed up to supervise. She took one look at my echo and told the techs, "If you put her on the treadmill, she could very well die." (a bit blunt) So of course I started shaking and crying, but it was the kick in the butt that I needed and I booked my OHS a few weeks later. Please be careful.

paco512
May 21st, 2008, 10:25 AM
I remember one particular Stress Echo where the Jr Doc was pushing me to go further and faster. All of a sudden the "Echo Tech" (after reading the previous echo) came over and put her hand on Jr's shoulder and told him that was enough. That was when i was still at about .9 Cm.

You are in fact the person in charge of your life.

If you are having pain... why not do a cath to look for blockage. If its not blockage... it must be the aorta/valve. NO?

Paco512
Mini AVR at Cleveland Clinic 5-5-08
Dr. Joeseph Sabik

Ross
May 21st, 2008, 01:00 PM
I took the chemical stress test and had a severe reaction following it. I'll never ever submit to another one of those again. There are plenty of other tests they run that it's not necessary to place anyone in danger.

Magic8Ball
May 21st, 2008, 08:46 PM
That is VERY interesting. Makes me feel like I need the surgery done like now.

It's an interesting thought to have, if you are afraid to take a stress test and are stopping weight lifting and generally becomming less active then whats the point of waiting longer.

Everyone stresses about the actuall surgery and the unmentionable outcome happening but i'd guess at the moment you are a fairly healthy individual in the general sense of the word and that unmentionable would be very rare.

If you wait 4-6 years until you reach 5ish and do nothing during that time what kind of state will you be in for the surgery then. Not to mention the worry and angst you will have every time you exert yourself during that time.

It's an unfortunate position to be in decision wise.

I didn't find out until i was 5.8 i think (or was it 5.6) but i had surgery within 3 months of finding out.

What would i have done had i found it at 4.8 ? can't say, but i certainly would not have been doing taekwondo etc during that time period like i did. I think i'd have just got it over and done with and moved on.

Having left it to later on i have thickening of the heart muscles which probably won't ever go away totally plus an enlarged heart which may also not shrink fully back to normal (although it has shrunk a bit)....getting this surgery done at 4.8 may have lessened my problems long term.

Anyway, even leaving it as late as i did and having a full bentalls i feel like a new man and the cardio only wants to see me yearly. I liken the surgery to getting a new pair of glasses.....you don't think your vision is bad until you try on the new pair......you probably feel ok most of the time now...once your problem is solved you will feel much better and calmer.

Good luck with your decision process.

ALCapshaw2
May 21st, 2008, 08:57 PM
I took the chemical stress test and had a severe reaction following it. I'll never ever submit to another one of those again. There are plenty of other tests they run that it's not necessary to place anyone in danger.

What kind of reaction Ross?

Duff Man
May 22nd, 2008, 02:36 AM
I remember one particular Stress Echo where the Jr Doc was pushing me to go further and faster. All of a sudden the "Echo Tech" (after reading the previous echo) came over and put her hand on Jr's shoulder and told him that was enough. That was when i was still at about .9 Cm.

You are in fact the person in charge of your life.

If you are having pain... why not do a cath to look for blockage. If its not blockage... it must be the aorta/valve. NO?

Paco512
Mini AVR at Cleveland Clinic 5-5-08
Dr. Joeseph Sabik

I would do that, but there's risks to that too. My uncle just had a cath done and they tore the first layer of a coronary artery. He had emergency "bypass" to fix it. I don't think he needed the bypass at all. He just had bypass in 04 I think.

I have the 64 slice ct scan images but it doesn't show the coronary arteries for some reason. That's an excellent idea though. I've had so many CT scans that I can't really justify getting dosed with more radiation. I've been following Lung nodules for quite a while now with ct scans every 6 months or year, plus scans for the aorta.

Ross
May 22nd, 2008, 04:58 AM
What kind of reaction Ross?

I could not breath. I sat in the waiting room turning blue. Nurse took one look at me, threw my butt in a wheel chair and it was off to see the Doc pronto.

Ross
May 22nd, 2008, 04:59 AM
Aaron do you have clubbing of your fingers?

Duff Man
May 22nd, 2008, 05:08 AM
Aaron do you have clubbing of your fingers?

I don't... they're just about as large as a sausages though. Short and stimpy. I think I wear a size 15 ring.

What are you thinking?

Ross
May 22nd, 2008, 06:32 AM
You mentioned nodules on your lung. Have you ever heard the term "blebs"?

I'm wondering if you and I don't have something weird going on that involves multiple organ systems and these things are all but associated symptoms of something larger, yet undiscovered.

Duff Man
June 9th, 2008, 08:15 PM
You mentioned nodules on your lung. Have you ever heard the term "blebs"?

I'm wondering if you and I don't have something weird going on that involves multiple organ systems and these things are all but associated symptoms of something larger, yet undiscovered.

Ross, I'm sorry it took so long to respond to your post:

I haven't heard of blebs, but after doing a little reading I certainly would not want it and especially in the lungs. My grandmother I believe had pneumothorax and died of complications from surgery to correct it - I THINK. Both of my parents have had pulmonary embolisms, and my Dad has a portion of his lung that's permanently collapsed. If I'm not mistaken I might have that too.

I'm very open minded bro, so if you have thoughts or ideas feel free to PM/post them.

Duff Man
June 10th, 2008, 09:01 PM
I went to a different cardiologist today and got my wish... I'm scheduled for that chemical type stress test in a couple days so I don't have to risk rupturing my aorta. I think it's called a persantine-thallium stress test.

I'm not thrilled about the extra radiation from the imaging required... but chest pain is chest pain.

Resqrn
June 11th, 2008, 10:10 PM
hey aaron, i was put on a treadmill stress test with an active ascending aortic dissection and the Cardiologist said "its not your heart" so go home and if you have more chest pain then come back and see us. i did have lots of chest pain prior and after test, was told heart looked good so what else could it be? well 2 days later with many, many more test we found out that my aorta dissected from the coronary arteries all the way to were the aorta splits in the pelvis, and up into the 3 great vessels on the arch. so not always will the stress test show what they are or are not looking for. glad you didn't do the test, hope you are still agreeing with your discission.

Duff Man
June 12th, 2008, 01:07 AM
When I had my chemical test, it felt like my chest was going to explode...the pressure, the SOB, the anxiety....and the pain was horrible. Harry:D:eek::eek::D


dude if that happens to me I'm going to need serious tranquilizers like immediately.

Ross
June 12th, 2008, 03:43 AM
My experience was much like Harry's, not going to allow another one to be done ever!

Debster
June 12th, 2008, 04:55 AM
My mom had same reaction as Harry and Ross....even her cardio said never agian:( Deb

Duff Man
June 12th, 2008, 05:16 AM
So this reaction you had Ross, was this an anaphylactic reaction or did they basically trigger a mini heart attack?

It sounds like Harry basically had a mini heart attack

Ross
June 12th, 2008, 05:21 AM
About 10 minutes after, I could not breath and was turning blue. Got the nurses attention pronto. They still don't know what the problem was. All I know is I'll never have another one. They don't need to do those anyhow with all the other diagnostic things the do.

upchurch131
June 12th, 2008, 05:35 AM
What do you guys think about having a "small" aneurysm and basically pushing it to the maximum on a treadmill?

In my opinion, there is no such thing as a "small" aneurysm if it is the one that kills you! My sister in law had a small brain aneurysm and died at the age of 41.

Err on the side of caution.

Arlyss
June 12th, 2008, 06:28 AM
The purpose of this testing is to examine the coronary arteries of the heart, looking for blockages that might prevent heart muscle from getting a full, free flow of blood.

In 2001, my husband had the chemical test - less invasive than an angiogram - prior to his surgery to remove his ascending aortic aneurysm. This is a nuclear medicine test.

By 2006, the 64 slice CT had appeared on the scene. This machine is so fast, it can image the coronaries on a beating heart. This is what my husband had prior to his redo valve surgery.

In both cases, his coronaries were clean - but it was important to know so a bypass could be planned for if needed. The 64 slicer also showed a small amount of calcification on his mitral, which was "scraped off" during surgery.

There is a brief video clip by Jerry Friede about 64 slice CT if you scroll down the page on this link. http://www.bicuspidfoundation.com This imaging center was one of the first in the country to offer 64 slice CT and has a lot of experience interpreting the results.

Imaging of the heart and blood vessels in the chest is one area that is advancing quite quickly - CT and MRI have come a long way just in the 7 years we have been involved with it.

I should add that in 1990, he had an angiogram prior to the replacement of his BAV, again for the same reason. No one told us about any nuclear imaging option then. He felt the affects from that angio in his groin when he walked, long after he was fully recovered from the heart surgery itself. I am not sure what they affected there, but it bothered him for a long time.

His coronaries, like most bicuspids, have always been clean. There are some bicuspids who have coronary artery disease also, but they are in the minority of those with BAVS.

Best wishes,
Arlyss

Diana
June 12th, 2008, 01:46 PM
The purpose of this testing is to examine the coronary arteries of the heart, looking for blockages that might prevent heart muscle from getting a full, free flow of blood.

In 2001, my husband had the chemical test - less invasive than an angiogram - prior to his surgery to remove his ascending aortic aneurysm. This is a nuclear medicine test.

By 2006, the 64 slice CT had appeared on the scene. This machine is so fast, it can image the coronaries on a beating heart. This is what my husband had prior to his redo valve surgery.

In both cases, his coronaries were clean - but it was important to know so a bypass could be planned for if needed. The 64 slicer also showed a small amount of calcification on his mitral, which was "scraped off" during surgery.

There is a brief video clip by Jerry Friede about 64 slice CT if you scroll down the page on this link. http://www.bicuspidfoundation.com This imaging center was one of the first in the country to offer 64 slice CT and has a lot of experience interpreting the results.

Imaging of the heart and blood vessels in the chest is one area that is advancing quite quickly - CT and MRI have come a long way just in the 7 years we have been involved with it.

I should add that in 1990, he had an angiogram prior to the replacement of his BAV, again for the same reason. No one told us about any nuclear imaging option then. He felt the affects from that angio in his groin when he walked, long after he was fully recovered from the heart surgery itself. I am not sure what they affected there, but it bothered him for a long time.

His coronaries, like most bicuspids, have always been clean. There are some bicuspids who have coronary artery disease also, but they are in the minority of those with BAVS.

Best wishes,
Arlyss


Arlyss - Thank you for this link. My husband is having his CT on Monday and I was excited to see this clip you posted. It is amazing what they can do now.

Diana

Anne K Sippit
June 13th, 2008, 01:17 PM
THis thread is scaring me. I questioned why they would want to do a stress test AND an Angiogram but I was told to bring a pair of comfortable walking shoes. I assumed the stress test was merely hopping onto a tread mill seeing how long I could go before I started wheezing and gasping.

Duff Man
June 13th, 2008, 02:14 PM
Well I did not enjoy that persantine test. It was uncomfortable to say the least. My chest/lungs felt like someone put sand bags on me and it hurt in a weird way. I was sweaty and totally wigged out. :D

"just two more minutes..." - nurse "OMGWTF I CANT" - me

I get the results in 4 days, but they said there was no EKG changes so that's a plus. There's still imaging they have to review.

Ross
June 13th, 2008, 05:38 PM
THis thread is scaring me. I questioned why they would want to do a stress test AND an Angiogram but I was told to bring a pair of comfortable walking shoes. I assumed the stress test was merely hopping onto a tread mill seeing how long I could go before I started wheezing and gasping.

Anne there are two different types of stress tests. Sounds like yours is on the treadmill. Were talking about the nuclear stress test which involves them injecting Adenosene into you to bring your heart up to excercise level for a few minutes and they read ekg. Some people tolerate it, others don't. You have to stop being afraid of things your read. This is all part of getting ready for this surgery. ;)

pamela
June 13th, 2008, 10:49 PM
Well, i've never had any blockages in the past 7 (nearly 8) years since I was diagnosed bicuspid, not even any narrowing in my coronaries. I do have twisty blood vessels though and they haven't been able to get all the way up to my great vessels before releasing the contrast medium.

I do have very low exercise tolerance and can be SOB even when inactive. My cardio has me booked for a stress test even though my echo came back with good result (I'll get a copy when I see him, he told me the results on the phone last weekend). I'll ask him exactly what he hopes to prove, I already have a mildly elevated resting HR and BP (92 and 130ish over 90ish) so learning how quickly those climb to dangerous levels will only prove that I'll need meds anyway.

The worst bit about the whole thing will be the actual stress they're going to put on my knees. My left knee still hates me after I hyper-extended it on ice just after my ACL recon and the right is going to have a pair of screws out along with a debridement pretty soon. <le sigh>

I don't think they have a 64 slice heart ctscan nearby, I'd have to go to Edmonton for that, but I'll ask my local guy what he thinks. Or maybe I can trick my way into a phone consult with Dr Fenske next week, before the stress test.

Aaron, I'm glad you got through ok and I'm waiting to hear the results. Here's hoping your tolerances are high and that you'll manage to stay moderately active before the big day on the mountain.

Take Heart,
Pamela.

Duff Man
June 13th, 2008, 11:18 PM
Hey Pamela, thanks for the good wishes. I'm hoping the discomfort I felt was only because of the Persantine but I'm encouraged by no changes in the EKG.

Maybe you can get a nuclear stress test instead so you don't have to hurt your knees? It might be worth the drive. I have tortuous veins too. Maybe it's a bi-cuspid thing...